COVID-19

Lincoln makes Pickup & Delivery service complementary, offers payment deferment

Lincoln is offering support to its customers during the conoronavirus pandemic.

Photo courtesy of Lincoln Motor Company

Lincoln is offering their customers peace of mind when it comes to their vehicle during the coronavirus pandemic. The company has made several of their services complementary and is allowing payment deferment options.

In an effort to minimize direct contact between humans, the company is offering Lincoln Pickup & Delivery to "clients for any service they need." That comes with a caveat. Here's the fine print the automaker offers for reference:

"Lincoln Pickup & Delivery Service is available for all 2017 model year and newer Lincoln vehicles with the 4-year/50,000 mile New Vehicle Limited Warranty. Owners of 2016 and prior model year vehicles and other vehicles not covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty may contact your preferred dealer for related cost and other important details. Mileage limitations may apply."

The company has also enhanced cleaning procedures for all Lincoln Loaner vehicles and the owner's vehicle while it's being serviced.

Additionally, Lincoln Automotive Financial Services is offering qualified buyers an opportunity to defer their first payment up to 120 days when purchasing a new Lincoln. This does not apply toward leases and is only available for qualified buyers. Payment deferrals not available in Pennsylvania, unless zero percent APR.

Existing Lincoln owners in the U.S. affected by COVID-19 who purchased or are leasing a Lincoln vehicle are encouraged to contact Lincoln Automotive Financial Services to discuss options if they are having payment difficulty.

Remote purchasing options are available at participating dealers.

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The Hispano Suiza Carmen will cost around $2 million.

Photo courtesy of Hispano Suiza

Unless your a posh vintage motoring enthusiast, the brand name Hispano Suiza may not be known to you. The company is hoping to change that, designing vehicles meant to make a splash among the Pagani and Rolls-Royce crowd. Like those companies offer, the automaker will offer the new Hispano Suiza Unique Tailormade Program.

The Unique Tailormade Program allows clients to choose between interior and exterior details, offering a high level of customization. In total, 1,904 different customization combinations are possible.

Customers will start by choosing the configuration line that best fits them. The configurations are named to fit the brand's DNA - Heritage, Sport, and Elegance. Designers have named some of the available colors after the historic landmarks and milestones of the brand, such as Peralada Green, Swiss Red, Xenia Gray, Birkigt White, and Begur Blue.

Customizable exterior parts include the grille, side mirrors, body color, wheels, and air intakes. On the inside, buyers can choose to personalize the steering wheel, dashboard, seat upholstery, and floor mats.

With the Unique Tailormade Program we wanted to capture the most diverse possibilities of creating a unique Hispano Suiza Carmen for each client. We want these 19 units of the Carmen to be a work of art on wheels, collectibles, symbols of excellence and that each owner can participate in the customisation process of their vehicle ," said Francesc Arenas, Design Director of Hispano Suiza.

Hispano Suiza was recently brought back to life by the Suqué Mateu family. Automobiles haven't been made under the marques name since the mid 1940s. The Mateu family are direct dependents of the one of Hispano-Suiza's original founders, Damián Mateu.

The Carmen is an all-electric car designed with influence from the 1938 Hispano-Suiza H6B Dubonnet Xenia. The new car was first shown at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

Hispano Suiza is limiting production of the Carmen to just 19 units, ensuring that it is an instant collector's car. Only five of those 19 will be built in the Boulogne version.

The car is expected to achieve around 1,100 horsepower and 855 pound-feet of torque via four permanent magnet synchronous motors housed in the rear axle. Engineers say that the car will get from zero to 62 mph in less than 2.6 seconds.

Pricing for the Carmen is expected to be around $2 million before taxes and fees.

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The Lamborghini Huracan EVO RWD is a fresh addition to the supercar company's lineup.

Photo by Jordan Golson

There's something about a supercar that is deeply enthralling. This is particularly true when that supercar is a Lamborghini Huracán painted in an outrageous matte purple called Viola Mel.

There's much more to a supercar than the price, but let's get that out of the way up front: My test car stickers for an honestly-quite-reasonable $278,516 after it was fitted with $66,250 worth of optional extras and an eye-watering $3,695 destination charge.

Much like the Rolls-Royce Ghost previously reviewed last week, the question of whether its "worth it" is entirely up to the potential buyer. Specifically whether or not they a: want a Lamborghini Huracán EVO RWD; and b: have $278,516 to spend on a wildly impractical 610-horsepower sports car. If the answers to both are true, then yes, it's worth it.

The car's Viola Mel color attracts a lot of attention.Photo by Jordan Golson

But first, the basics: Getting in the Huracán isn't easy. And I don't just mean coming up with a house worth of cash to buy one — I mean literally climbing in. I had to teach a few people how to do it and it goes something like this: Open door; put one foot inside the footwell; set butt on the door sill; slide butt into seat; bring other foot into footwell; close door. To leave, reverse it.

It's not an elegant process and doing it in anything remotely approaching a dignified manner is tricky. But, if you do it right, your car will be painted in that Viola Mel color and folks won't be paying any attention to your haphazard attempts to not fall over when exiting the car because they'll be too busy falling in love with the paint. That's a $16,500 paint job by the way, courtesy of Lamborghini's Ad Personam customization program and words fail when trying to describe how good it looks in person.

It looks so magnificent that people think it's fake. I brought it to the weekly South OC Cars and Coffee event — ostensibly it's an impromptu car show for all manner of car enthusiasts, but an awful lot of Lambo drivers show up to show off. There were at least ten Huracáns in attendance, including a spyder in what a Porsche enthusiast would call Miami Blue — but none garnered as much attention as the Viola Mel.

Storage space is at a premium.Photo by Jordan Golson

This is what owning a supercar (or borrowing one for the weekend, in my case) is all about. Except the paint job was so outrageously unique that nearly everyone thought it was a really good wrap, or temporary vinyl covering. It costs a lot of money to have Lamborghini paint their car in such a way that it convinces people that you put a wrap on your car. And then you get to explain that no, it's not a wrap, it's paint and here let me show you this sticker under the hood that proves it's an original factory paint job. There aren't many cars that could get me going about the paint for hundreds of words, but here we are.

This was my second Huracán, and the first was wildly uncomfortable. A friend that I gave a ride to still talks about how awful it was, and that was five years ago. I wasn't sure if it was because of the car or because of the seats — but it was a little bit of both. That one had the most hardcore racing seats Lambo offers fitted to it, while this one has the mid-tier Sport Seat ($7,500). They're fairly comfortable, as sports car seats go, and are manually adjustable which is good for racing but I might skip them and get the "base" comfort seats instead unless you're going racing, in which case go for the uncomfortable race chairs.

Enough about the look; now on to that 610-horsepower V10. I'm not usually one to get emotional about the good old days, but there is something really special about a giant naturally aspirated engine that's going to be lost from the world soon due to new engine and fuel economy regulations, not to mention the advancement of technology.

The engine fires up with a ferocious bark that rattles the soul like a bolt of lightning and happily revs to terrifying heights with the slightest twitch of the throttle. The start button, hidden beneath an absurdly wonderful red missile-launcher-esque protective cover, might as well inject dopamine directly into your brain in such prodigious amounts as to make you forget about the pandemic, the fact that Trump isn't President or that he ever was (your choice), and that Tom Brady has seven Super Bowl rings and you don't.

And that's before you aim that Viola Mel nose at the nearest interstate on-ramp and punch it, Chewie.

Troubles forgotten. Smile affixed. Life ain't so bad.

At least until you have to slow down because you're well into triple digits and you haven't even merged onto the highway yet. Still. It's a good day.

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