Electric Vehicles

New report scores states on the steps taken to reduce barriers for EV adoption

The Chevrolet Bolt EV is just one of the electric vehicles sold in the U.S.

Photo by Sebastian Rothe/EyeEm/Getty Images

A new report by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy scores U.S. states and the District of Columbia based on their readiness for enabling electric vehicle (EV) adoption amongst its residents and businesses.

The State Transportation Electrification Scorecard rates each state giving up to 100 possible points. State actions on incentives amounted to a score of up to 30 points. Planning and goal setting was worth up to 17 points. States could earn up to 12 points to by having policies at the intersection of electrification and transportation system efficiency. Grid optimization was assigned 10 points. Up to 21 points were possible as the Scorecard take a close look at how policies and regulations have impacted life following adoption. One bonus point was available for states that have vehicle-to-grid pilot programs.

The Scorecard found that California was the leader amongst the states, earning 91 out of a possible 100 points. The Council found that California is the only state that has set deadlines for electrifying transit buses, heavy trucks, and commercial vehicles, and is one of the few that offers assistance to lower-income drivers to replace their high-polluting cars with zero- or near-zero-emissions vehicles.

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy  Twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia were ranked as part of the report.Photo courtesy of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

"I'm thrilled that California is being recognized with top honors for our leadership efforts, especially at a time when Governor Newsom is doubling down on our commitment to ensuring all Californians can participate in the transition to clean transportation," said California Energy Commissioner Patty Monahan. "Our experience shows transportation electrification is a win-win: good for the economy and most importantly for the health and well-being of those affected most by air pollution from tailpipe emissions."

New York (63.5 points), Washington, DC (59), Maryland (56), Massachusetts (54.5), Washington (54), Vermont (54), Colorado (48), Oregon (47), and New Jersey (44) round out the top 10. Twenty states earned 15 points or fewer.

Outside the top 10, Colorado was recognized for its efforts to meet their goal of having 940,000 EVs on the road by 2030. Minnesota was the top scorer in the Midwest (39.5 points). Virginia lead scores in the Southeast (36 points).

Twenty-three states have begun planning for more EVs and EV charging options. Twenty-seven states offer incentives for purchasing EVs including rebates, tax credits, and grants to buy large electric pickups and delivery trucks. Nearly every state (48) is planning to use federal funds to buy electric transit buses and 36 states offer lower electric rates at preferred times for Level 2 charging. Fifteen states have invested to fund utilities to spur EV and EV charging adoption in low-income areas and environmental justice communities.

Full results of the Scorecard can be found here.

Trending News

 
 

This 1971 Lamborghini Miura SV sold for a high sum.

Photo courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini

This month, two 1970s-era Lamborghinis crossed the block, each achieving a record selling price. But, not all that glitters is gold. Both models have what RM-Sotheby's terms "a troubled history".

The 1971 Lamborghini Miura SV is chassis #4980. It has been certified as one of the 150 models produced. It was set apart from other Miuras by its different cam timing and altered 4x3-barrel Weber carburetors. Its 3.9-liter V-12 engine that was tuned to achieve 380 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque. When it was new, it rode on Pirelli Cinturato tires.

The year before the Miura SV debuted, Lamborghini development driver Bob Wallace modified a Miura to comfort to FIA's Appendix J racing regulations. Among the mods was the replacement of the the steel chassis and body panels with aluminum alloy versions. It as given the name "Miura Jota". The '71 Miura up for auction was altered to mimic this model during its life, but has recently been restored it its original trim.

1971 Lamborghini Miura SV

Photo courtesy of RM-Sotheby's

Following its restoration the Miura SV received its certification from Lamborghini Polo Storico.

A 1977 Lamborghini Countach LP 400 with chassis #1120262 underpinning has a similarly troubled history. It was at one time owned by Rod Stewart, but that's not the trouble. It was a victim of multiple transformations (including the roof removal), before being restored to its original specifications.

The Miura SV fetched €2.4 million, the second highest value ever for a Miura SV, second only to one sold by Gooding & Co. in London last September. The Countach LP 400 went for €775,000.

"This is a pleasing but not surprising result, since it confirms a clear trend," says Paolo Gabrielli, Head of Aftersales at Automobili Lamborghini, which oversees the Polo Storico. Historical Lamborghinis are of increasing interest to the world's leading collectors, who are looking for the utmost respect for originality in their cars. The Polo Storico restoration program, alongside supporting top independent specialists through the provision of advice, documents and original spare parts, makes it possible to obtain restorations of the highest level and quality, which are appreciated by collectors and, consequently, by the market."

Trending News

 
 

The Nissan Ariya has wind glide over it in the testing tunnel.

Photo courtesy of Nisan Motor Company

Nissan is targeting a drag coefficient (Cd) of 0.297 for the Ariya all-electric crossover. If it can make that number, it will be the company's most aerodynamic crossover to date. What does that mean? Let's take a closer look.

What is drag?

Simply put, drag is an aerodynamic force. It's mechanical in nature, so it is the result of the interaction of a solid body and a liquid. In the case of a car, this liquid is air. (Yes, air is a liquid.) It only occurs when one part of the equation (the solid body or the liquid) is in motion. If there is no motion, there is no drag.

Drag only occurs in the opposite direction of the object's movement. Think of a car cutting through the air as it drives down a north-south road. As the car heads north, the air it passes through is pushed south. The car is in motion; there is drag.

2022 Nissan Ariya

Photo courtesy of Nisan Motor Company

1 / 6

What is coefficient of drag?

The coefficient of drag, also called a drag coefficient, is a number that aerodynamics professions (aerodynamicists) use to determine the shape, inclination, and flow conditions on a vehicle's drag. The shape of an object (bullet vs. square vs prism, etc.) has a large impact on the amount of drag created by airflow surrounding a vehicle. Objects with narrower front ends tend to have a lower coefficient.

Scientists and vehicle designers want to keep air moving around the car for maximum efficiency. The inclination of the airflow to either move in a smooth, connected pattern, or to be broken up with air sitting, stalling in one particular part of the vehicle, lessening airflow and making the vehicle less aerodynamic.

A vehicle's Cd is determined by plugging various measurements into an equation. Cd is equal to drag (D) divided by the quantity of density (r) multiplied by half the velocity (V) squared multiple by the reference area (A). As an equation, it looks like this: Cd = D / (A * .5 * r * V^2).

The smaller the Cd, the more aerodynamic a vehicle is.

2022 Nissan Ariya

The Nissan Ariya employs aerodynamic wheel design, made to help it cut though the air with greater ease.

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

What is the coefficient of drag of the Nissan Ariya?

"With the growing shift towards electric mobility, aerodynamic testing is becoming increasingly important. The aerodynamics of electric vehicles are directly linked to how efficiently the vehicle moves – less drag and better stability allows the customer to drive longer distances before having to recharge," said Sarwar Ahmed, Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics Engineer at Nissan Technical Centre Europe.

Nissan is targeting a 0.297 coefficient of drag for the Ariya. How will it achieve that number? By utilizing precisely shaped body lines and strategically placed air ducts, among other components. There's a bonus to better aerodynamics when it comes to EVs.

"Following official homologation of the Nissan Ariya later this year, we anticipate the range to improve compared to the 310 mile figure shared in 2020 during the World Premiere. This will give drivers more efficiency and confidence to go even further on a single charge," said Marco Fioravanti, VP Product Planning, Nissan Europe.

How does the Ariya's coefficient of drag compare to other Nissans?

The newest Nissans, the Kicks, Pathfinder, and Frontier, don't have their Cd publicly available yet, but other models have their results. The targeted 0.297 Cd in the Ariya is less than that in the 2021 Armada, Murano, and Rogue. But, it's higher than the Nissan Leaf.

The fact that it's higher than the Leaf is not surprising. Shorter cars tend to be more aerodynamic because they sit lower to the ground and have a smaller profile. That also explains why Nissan's largest and boxiest SUV, the Armada, has the highest number on the list.

How does the Ariya's coefficient of drag compare to numbers from other EVs?

The Nissan Ariya's coefficient of drag is higher than that of most other electric cars, crossovers, and SUVs sold in the U.S. Here's where the others measure up:

Trending News