Electric Vehicles

Roland Gumpert introduces Nathalie, a road-legal, methane-powered electric super sports car

Photo courtesy of Roland Gumpert

Famed race car driver Roland Gumpert is back in the sports car space. This time, it's with his own company (they share a name) and a unique creation - something that's hard to find in the auto space these days. Meet Nathalie, a road-legal electric super sports car with performance handling that runs on methane. Yes, methane.

The car, which is named after one of Gumpert's daughters, was first shown as a prototype in 2018, but is now ready for production, as a 2021 model.

2021 Roland Gumpert Nathalie

Photo courtesy of Roland Gumpert

Messaging from the company says that the model is, "an uncompromising electric super sports car. It is one of the fastest and most dynamic sports cars you can drive with a license plate on a normal road."

The car is slated to achieve 536 horsepower and get from zero to 60 mph in 2.5 seconds. It has a top speed of 190 mph and a claimed range of over 300 miles in spirited driving situations. It is said to have nearly double the range when drivers choose to drive more conservatively using Eco mode.

Where does that power come from? It comes from methane.

In the Toyota Mirai, a fuel cell-electric powertrain uses hydrogen to move the car along the road. The concept with the Nathalie is similar, only instead of hydrogen, the car uses methane. It has a 17.1-gallon methanol tank.

Methane is an abundant resource on Earth, most noted recently because of its existence as a byproduct of the digestion process of cows. BMW is also exploring the possibilities of methane, utilizing the manure from a farm in California.

How does a methanol fuel cell work? | Gumpert Nathalie | Roland Gumpert www.youtube.com

Roland Gumpert will begin producing the model in early 2021, producing just 500 of them at first and they will be labeled First Edition models. The price tag sits at approximately $460,000.

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New technology is embedded into the brake caliper.

Photo courtesy of Brembo

Brembo is celebrating 60 years of brand braking history with the debut of a bit of its future. The New G Sessanta Concept is a peek at what the company sees as the future of mobility. It was inspired by the first brake caliper for motorbikes produced by the company, an innovation in 1972.

The company says that the core of the concept is LED technology, which is applied directly to the body of the caliper, a feature that is adaptable to every type of caliper they craft. Brembo sees the tech as being able to enhance the caliper's form and function serving as both an interface and an aesthetic. It will be able to "communicate directly with the user" and "adapt to the user's tastes and preferences". A new video released by Brembo shows the LED color changing via a smartphone app.

 New G Sessanta Concept The New G Sessanta Concept features interactive tech.Photo courtesy of Brembo

Brembo is often known for using bright, flashy colors on its calipers and the new light plays on that. The New G Sessanta is designed to be customizable via wireless technology. When a vehicle equipped with the caliper is stopped, the user can control the desired shade of light to express mood, enhance the style of the bike, or adapt it to the surroundings.

Additionally, the LEDs could use color and light to relay data and information regarding the conditions of the vehicle and caliper itself, or even help localize a parked vehicle by emitting a courtesy light.

Watch the video below to see the vision of the New G Sessanta come to life.

BREMBO “NEW G SESSANTA”: THE NEW BRAKE CALIPER CONCEPT SET TO SHAPE THE FUTURE OF MOBILITY www.youtube.com

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An Infiniti Q60 drifts at Yokohama Harbor.

Photo courtesy of Infiniti

A new film showcases the drifting capabilities of a heavily modified Infiniti Q60. The coupe currently competes in the domestic top-tier drift championship in Japan even though the sports coupe is not sold there.

Before reaching the docks in Japan, the car was heavily modified having started its journey in America. The car was built to show off renowned restoration specialist Tatsuhiro Shibata's passion for the Infiniti brand.

The video features Shibata and his driver, Koudai Sobagiri putting the The hand-built model to the test and showing off near Infiniti's world headquarters in Yokohama, Japan. The closed course near Yokohama Harbor served as the set.

"In my eyes, the Q60 was the best looking of (the Infiniti lineup), but they didn't sell any in Japan. So we had to go to the U.S. to find one," Shibata says. "It's simple; I just wanted a good-looking racing car."

Tatsuhiro Shibata's Infiniti Q60

Photo courtesy of Infiniti

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This isn't the first time that Shibata has imported an Infiniti to Japan. His passion has led him to do so for the last decade. Shibata is not directly affiliated with Infiniti.

Following the film, Infiniti plans to release an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the film and the Shibata Infiniti Q60. An exclusive story about Shibata's workshop, Sobagiri's path to drifting, and more will be released along with the behind-the-scenes film.

1,000HP INFINITI Q60: Drifting at the Docks www.youtube.com

The release of the film comes as Infiniti is playing catch up with much of their business plans. Amid falling sales and the COVID-19 pandemic, plans for two new models to be introduced had to be push to 2021 including the 2022 Infiniti QX55 and the forthcoming redesigned QX60.

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