Golfing

Bentley tees up new golf club collection just in time for spring

Golf fans who also love Bentley may want to invest in a new set of uniquely engineered clubs.

Photo courtesy of Bentley Motors

The newest addition to Bentley's lineup fits in the back seat of the Continental GT. No, it's not that rumored two-seater they keep teasing. It's a set of golf clubs.

The new Tech Collection from Bentley Golf utilizes multi-material technology to maximize performance, not unlike what can be found in Bentley automobiles. The clubs are designed for everyone from a seasoned professional to a beginner.

Bentley Golf club collection The clubs feature a variety of nods to Bentley automobiles.Photo courtesy of Bentley Motors

The irons feature titanium faces and carbon-fiber backs. Both wedge options have CNC-milled face grooves and back cavities, with a rounded sole. The putter combines high-density steel, super-soft aluminium and carbon-fiber detailing that offers support for off-centre strikes.

Designers wanted to balance the appearance of the club with the traditional hallmarks of the Bentley brand and modern materials. Motifs from the new Continental GT appear on the club grips and faces in the form of Bentley's distinctive knurling. Bentley has employed the iconic styling-line of its car haunches in the crown and sole of the wood. Distinctive "B" screens are in place and the wood heads and grip ends feature replicas of the unique wheel centre from the famous Le Mans winer, the EXP Speed 8.

The clubs were revealed for the first time at the PGA Merchandise Show, Orlando in January 2020, and will be available to purchase this spring. To register interest in the clubs, visit www.bentleygolf.com.

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The 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L is show in the Overland trim level.

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

The Jeep Grand Cherokee has been redesigned but we'll only see a three-row version for the 2021 model year. If you want the two-row, you'll have to wait another year. In the new Grand Cherokee L, a freshly refined interior and exterior is joined with off-road prowess and next-generation technology to make the Grand Cherokee worthy of a cross-shop.

Which Grand Cherokee model is right for you? Scroll down to see the features and specs of each of the SUV's grades, including price. All prices exclude a $1,695 destination charge.

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Laredo

The base model Jeep Grand Cherokee L is no low-tech slouch. It comes standard with a 10.1-inch infotainment touch screen and a 10.25-inch frameless digital instrument cluster. Below the infotainment screen is an 8.4-inch touch screen. The SUV's Uconnect 5 operating system offers customization, a one-touch Home Screen, five user profiles, and standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. There are 12 USB ports, split between Type A and Type C, covering all three rows of seating.

The Laredo trim level seats six or seven, depending on the buyer's choice of second row seats. The second-row seats feature standard tip and slide functionality.

Among the roster of standard safety equipment and security features are full-speed collision warning with active brake assist and pedestrian and cyclist detection, rear cross traffic detection, adaptive cruise control, lane keeping assist, lane departure warning, brake assist, blind spot monitoring, and rear park assist.

Keyless entry, automatic headlights, LED daytime tuning lights, and LED taillamps are standard.

The Laredo model is powered by a 3.6-liter V6 engine that delivers 290 horsepower and 257 pound-feet of torque. The engine is paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission.

It rides on 18-inch aluminum wheels, and also has heated fold-way mirrors, roof rails, cloth seats with power-adjustable eight-way driver seat, automatic dual-zone climate control, a leather-wrapped and heated steering wheel, and Bluetooth.

The 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L is listed at $36,995 for the rear-wheel drive model and $38,995 for the 4x4.

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Altitude

The Cherokee L Altitude builds on the Laredo grade adding gloss black appearance details, including 20-inch aluminum wheels, exterior accents and badging, roof rails, and a unique seven-slot grille.

Upgrading to the 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Altitude will cost $40,195 (4x4) or $42,195 (4x4).

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Limited

Like the Altitude, the Limited builds on the Laredo model of the Grand Cherokee L. The exterior of this model includes automatic high beam headlights, LED fog lamps, power gloss black side mirrors with heating element, blind spot monitoring, and additional turn signals.

Four-wheel drive models get a Selec-Trac traction management system with five available terrain modes (Auto, Sprot, Rock, Snow, Sand/Mud).

The interior of the model gets upgraded to standard Capri leather seats and comes with an eight-way power-adjustable driver's seat with memory, four-way power-adjustable front passenger seat with memory, and heated steering wheel. The second row seats are also heated. Active noise cancellation and single-color ambient lighting is standard.

Remote start, a universal garage door opener, and an adjustable height power liftgate are also standard.

Buyers can get the 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Limited for $43,995 in the 2WD variant and $45,995 for the 4x4.

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland: Seating & Cargo Areas

The 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland has a refined seating and cargo area.

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

Buyers of the Overland grade get a unique Overland appearance on their Grand Cherokee L. That includes 20-inch aluminum wheels, Black Noise pockets, chrome front tow hoods, a gloss black roof rack with stainless insert, rain-sensing windshield wipers, approach-lit door handles, trailer towing, rearview mirror puddle lighting, power-folding gloss black mirrors with a chrome insert that auto-tilt down when in reverse, auto-dimming glass not eh driver's side, courtesy lighting, a windshield wiper deicer, and keyless entry.

Buyers can opt for a Gloss Black roof to give their model a two-town paint scheme starting with this trim level.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee L Overland is the first trim level that offers buyers the opportunity to get the standard V6 engine or upgrade to a 357-horsepower V8 that delivers 390 pound-feet of torque. With the V8, the Grand Cherokee L Overland is capable of towing 7,200 pounds.

Overland 4x4 models get Jeep's torque-vectoring Quadra-Trac II system when equipped with available Off-Road Group and earn the Trail Rated badge. The equipment package also includes high-strength steel skid plates, electronic limited slip differential rear axle, 18-inch aluminum wheels, and all-season tires. A Select-Terrain system and Hill Descent Control are standard on Overland.

The model's interior features Nappa leather seats and door panels, ventilated front seats, a leather-stitched instrument panel, navigation, a nine-speaker Alpine audio system, dual-pane sunroof, and five-color ambient lighting. Front seat passengers get length-adjustable cushions while. power-folding third-row bench seat is also standard.

An electronic remote release in the rear cargo area is designed to quickly folding the second row flat. A hands-free liftgate is also standard.

Buyers will pay $52,995 for the 4x2 model with a V6 under the hood. A four-wheel drive Overland with the V6 costs $54,995. Upping to the V8, which is only available paired with a 4x4 brings the price up to $58,290.

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summit

This model is available with either the V6 or V8 powertrain. They deliver the same output in the Grand Cherokee L Summit as they do in the Overland.

The Grand Cherokee L Summit raises the bar further into luxury territory with premium appointments including Nappa leather leather seats with quilted seat bolsters and perforated seat inserts on all three rows. Absolute Oak wood, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, and Berber floor mats, and 16-way power-adjustable adjustable front seats are standard on Summit. For the first time on Grand Cherokee, front-row seat massage functionality is available.

Quad-zone automatic climate control is standard and second-row passengers have access to a second-row floor console with two illuminated cup holders and a two-tier armrest with additional storage.

The whole rig rides on 20-inch polished cast-aluminum wheels in Mid-Gloss Clear and has Sumit-specific LED fog lamps, power-folding Gloss Black side mirrors with a Platinum insert, a 360-degree camera, illuminated door sills, and roof rack with silver rails and a gloss black insert.

Jeep has also added more standard safety features on this model including active driving assist, driver attention monitor, intersection collision assist, traffic sign recognition, and parallel and perpendicular park assist.

Rear-wheel drive Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summits powered by a V6 cost $56,995. The four-wheel drive version of that model is $58,995. Changing out the V6 for a V8 in the 4x4 brings the price up to $62,290.

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summit Reserve

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summit Reserve: Exterior rear 1/4

The 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summit Reserve is the most premium model.

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

The Grand Cherokee L Summit Reserve is the most luxurious Grand Cherokee L that you'll be able to get straight from the factory. It features a hand-wrapped, quilted Palermo leather, ventilated front and second-row seats, memory and massage front seats and choice of a new Tupelo interior color add distinguishable details to the model.

The interior features open-pore Waxed Walnut wood and wrapped, suede-like fabric on the A-pillars and headliner.

Jeep has given this version of the SUV 21-inch wheels and a 19-speaker McIntosh audio sound system.

The Summit Reserve trim is only available as a 4x4. Getting with the V6 costs $61,995; the V8 is $65,290.

The 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L is scheduled to start arriving in Jeep dealerships in the second quarter of 2021.

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The Acura TLX offers buyers a good time behind the wheel and true premium appointments.

Photo courtesy of Acura

The Honda Accord is a really decent car. It's perennially one of the top sellers in the U.S., and for good reason. But, sometimes the Accord isn't enough. That's where the Acura TLX comes in.

Acura has completely redesigned the TLX for the 2021 model year. It's made the car into a sharp-looking and better handling machine that is designed to remind buyers what Acura was all about in its 1990s and 2000s heyday. One quick trip around the neighborhood will show you that it achieves that, in spades. A longer trip will make you realize that it's okay to say "no" buying an SUV.

2021 Acura TLX Advance Diving the TLX is a pleasure. It's both comfortable to be in and engaging to toss around on the road.Photo courtesy of Acura

2021 Acura TLX Advance

The exterior of the car looks good. It has LEDs in the right places for its premium price point and styling that makes it stand out (for all the right reasons) more than it blends in. The car is athletic in its state and a bit moody and aggressive while fitting in with the rest of the Acura family, which includes the redesigned 2022 MDX. Every bit of that is a positive.

The TLX is longer, wider, and taller than the Accord by a few inches in each direction.

The suggestion of performance extends from the outside to the inside though the cabin does not set aside the comfort and convenience features one typically wants from a sedan for the weight-saving suede substitute upholstery or unique and different-just-to-be-different knobs, dials, and buttons that make operation more complicated than it needs to be. The TLX is more than properly trimmed out for its price point.

One of the best features of the TLX is its space. The waterfall dashboard design gives the front passenger the illusion of having more space to occupy in front of them. There is more passenger volume in the 2021 TLX versus the 2020 - slightly more room - and all other -room metrics are nearly the same from the old generation to the next. The Accord has more headroom, three cubic feet more cargo space, and nearly 10 cubic feet more passenger space.

The TLX is longer, wider, and taller than the Accord.Photo courtesy of Acura

The center console's side bolsters, with their interiors accented in real wood add to the premium look and feel of the vehicle in an unexpected way. Between those bolsters are the Acura's climate controls. They are button-operated and match what is in the RDX and MDX. They're not as fancy as what you'll find in a luxury car, but for the premium segment, they're attractive enough and extremely easy to use, which makes them winners.

Putting the Dynamic Mode drive mode selector front and center in the TLX, RDX, and MDX makes it easy to use and puts it front of mind. The shifter being directly under it frees up center console space, a logical layout that is an equal part practical.

Speaking of dynamic, the TLX is a dynamic dream, for a non-sports car. While the tester was not the TLX Type S (that super sporty variant is coming later this year), it does have quite a bit of dynamic difference form the Accord. The TLX with all-wheel drive grips the road, even when you're pushing the limits of what it can handle.

Steering is accurate and properly weighted, and allows the car to easily go where you want it. The TLX takes corners with ease and little body lean. There's no need for super bolstered seats as the TLX doesn't toss you around unless you make it.

The car's waterfall dashboard gives the interior a spacious feeling.Photo courtesy of Acura

Acceleration from its 2.0--liter turbo-four is plenty for daily drivability, and even when you want to go have a riot behind the wheel on the weekend. The engine is paired with a 10-speed automatic transmission that delivers the 272 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque smoothly and relatively efficiently. Changing to the Sport drive model gives the TLX noticeably shorter shifts and changes up the throttle response and damping capability, and tightens up the steering. It's a proper Sport mode.

While you're at speed, or idling, there's a lot to take in on the driver's information display. Smartly, Acura has put the necessary information front and center. If you're looking for your trip meter, fuel efficiency, or odometer information, you're doing to need to look to the smaller area of the screen. While you might strain your eyes to see it, you don't really need the info displayed there on-the-go.

There are folks out there that complain about the Acura touch interface for the infotainment system controls. Spend some time with them and sincerely get to know them and they suddenly become incredibly easy to use. Just remember, unlike a mouse, there's no swiping to move the selector. It's a touch-for-touch system like on an iPad.

The touch pad interface and wireless device charging are well placed.Photo courtesy of Acura

The space where Acura has elected to fit the wireless device charger is also its own type of genius. It's below the center console bump out wrist rest for the touch interface, which holds it in place when carving corners, and keeps it close enough to the driver that you can look down and see what alert has popped up if you're not using Apple CarPlay or Android Auto at the time.

Acura's long list of standard and available safety and driver assist features help keep you going down the road without nagging. The car also has Acura's new airbag technology for the front seat passenger.

Pricing for the TLX starts at $37,500. As tested, the car was nearly $50,000. The TLX blows away its closest premium competition by a mile. Maybe more. It's also a lot better at $48,000 than what you'll find in many other luxury cars for the same price.

Most importantly though, Acura has put significant daylight between its Honda brother, not just in price, but also in materials, drivability, maneuverability, and design. That's a big step in the right direction for the brand.

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