Survey Says

New data shows where, when drivers are most likely to crash

Agero, which supplies roadside assistance, analyzed their calls for help to get results on likely incident scenarios.

Photo by Getty Images

Data from 65 million U.S. drivers has revealed when and where they are most likely to need roadside assistance. Agero, one of the largest providers of roadside assistance in the country, for companies including Toyota, Ford, and Progressive, conducted extensive quantitative and qualitative research and analysis to detail what a typical call for help looks like outside of a traditional crash scenario. These are the results.

Breakdowns can come in multiples. 

Of the respondents who experienced a breakdown in the last six months, nearly two-thirds of those under 35 years old reported experiencing two or more breakdown events, while just 40 percent of those over 35 experienced two or more.

It almost always happens on a weekday.

While one might assume a breakdown is most likely to occur during a long drive, like a summer or holiday road trip, this happens just four percent of the time. Instead, over 75 percent of breakdowns occur during the daytime and roughly 70 percent happen on weekdays – causing major inconvenience when you're about use the car to run errands (42 percent) or commute to or from work (25 percent).

Most incidents happen close to home.

Everyone's worst case scenario is being left stranded on the side of a highway. But as it turns out, this happens just 13 percent of the time. A calmer neighborhood street is the much more likely location, occurring almost a quarter of the time (22 percent). And, the chance of a breakdown happening while driving vs. parked is an even 50-50 split, with a significant portion of respondents at home (26 percent) or in a parking lot (25 percent) when their issue occurred. Overall, roughly 80 percent of events occur within 30 minutes of home.

Most incidents also happen while drivers are alone.

The natural tendency is to worry about being stranded with our kids in the car. Fortunately, this is often not the case. Over half of events (53 percent) occurred with no other passengers in the car. Other adults and children are present just 13 percent of the time, while drivers reported having only kids in the car for eight percent of events.

Most incidents don't require a tow truck.

A full 75 percent of the time, the event doesn't require a tow, and is instead a caused by a dead battery (24 percent), flat tire (23 percent), lockout (12 percent), out of fuel (10 percent) or stuck in a ditch, mud, etc. (5 percent). A tow is required just 25 percent of the time due to a mechanical problem (17 percent) or flat tire with no spare available (8 percent).

Spare tires are becoming increasingly less common as standard equipment in vehicles so it will be interesting to see how these numbers change over time. If you're not 100 percent sure if your vehicle has a spare tire and the proper equipment to change the tire, now's the time to check.

About half of vehicles on the road have an incident by the time they get to be eight years old.

Perhaps not surprisingly, vehicle age can play a role in the likelihood of a breakdown. In recent years, roughly 10 percent of cars two years old or less have had a breakdown. But the likelihood begins to spike after that, with approximately 30 percent of cars experiencing a breakdown by the time they are four years old and half experiencing such an event by the time they are eight years old.

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

A new study reviewed fatal crash data put out by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

New analysis from ValuePenguin, a division of LendingTree, has determined the most dangerous vehicles on the road today. Pickup trucks are among the five most dangerous models.

The results of the study were determined by analysts from ValuePenguin studying fatal crash data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to find which cars, trucks and SUVs are most likely to be in fatal crashes.

The data spans the 2014 to 2018 model years and includes many of the most popular cars, trucks, and SUVs in North America. ValuePenguin's analysis takes into consideration the number of total fatal accidents per model. It makes sense that America's best-selling vehicles would have more fatal accidents per year because there are more of them on the road.

Since 2018, many automakers have added a host of standard and available safety and driver assist technology to their vehicles. In theory, those additions should decrease the number of fatalities in the coming years.

It's important to remember that vehicles themselves are not inherently dangerous. It is drivers that put themselves and others at risk by climbing behind the wheel. The likelihood of a fatal crash can be raised by a driver operating the vehicle in an unsafe manner.

Scroll down to see the 25 most dangerous vehicles on the road based on ValuePenguin's findings.

No. 25 - Jeep Wrangler

2018 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

Total fatal crashes: 1,513
Units sold in 2018: 240,032
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.51

No. 24 - Honda CR-V

2018 Honda CR-V

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

Total fatal crashes: 1,526
Units sold in 2018: 379,013
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.53

No. 23 - Ford Fusion

2018 Ford Fusion

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 1,550
Units sold in 2018: 173,600
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.53

No. 22 - Nissan Sentra

2018 Nissan Sentra NISMO

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Total fatal crashes: 1,561
Units sold in 2018: 213,046
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.67

No. 21 - Ford Escape

2018 Ford Escape

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 1,700
Units sold in 2018: 272,228
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.52

No. 20 - Toyota Tacoma

2018 Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro

Photo courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc.

Total fatal crashes: 1,763
Units sold in 2018: 245,659
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.54

No. 19 - Chevrolet GMT-400

Fourth Generation Chevrolet C/K (GMT 400)

Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Total fatal crashes: 1,851
Units sold in 2018: Not sold in 2018
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.63

No. 18 - Ford Taurus

2017 Ford Taurus

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 1,913
Units sold in 2018: 40,341
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.70

No. 17 - Ford Mustang

2018 Ford Mustang Performance Pack 2

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 1,963
Units sold in 2018: 75,842
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.71

No. 16 - Chevrolet Tahoe

2018 Chevrolet Tahoe Custom

Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Total fatal crashes: 2,113
Units sold in 2018: 104,152
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.50

No. 15 - Ford Focus

2018 Ford Focus

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 2,256
Units sold in 2018: 114,045
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.68

No. 14 - Jeep Grand Cherokee

2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

Total fatal crashes: 2,304
Units sold in 2018: 224,908
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.52

No. 13 - Chevrolet Malibu

2017\u20132019 Chevrolet Malibu Hybrid Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Total fatal crashes: 2,345
Units sold in 2018: 144,542
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.64

No. 12 - Ford Ranger

2011 Ford Ranger

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 2,476
Units sold in 2018: Not sold in the U.S. in 2018
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.68

No. 11 - Chevrolet Impala

2016 Chevrolet Impala Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Total fatal crashes: 2,804
Units sold in 2018: 56,556
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.68

No. 10 - GMC Sierra

2017 GMC Sierra

Photo courtesy of GMC

Total fatal crashes: 3,245
Units sold in 2018: 219,554
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.48

No. 9 - Nissan Altima

2017 Nissan Altima

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Total fatal crashes: 3,267
Units sold in 2018: 209,146
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.60

No. 8 - Ford Explorer

2018 Ford Explorer Sport

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 3,332
Units sold in 2018: 261,571
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.61

No. 7 - Toyota Corolla

Toyota C2orolla Photo courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc.

Total fatal crashes: 3,430
Units sold in 2018: 303,732
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.64

No. 6 - Honda Civic

2018 Honda Civic Coupe

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

Total fatal crashes: 4,397
Units sold in 2018: 325,760
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.70

No. 5 - Ram Pickup

2018 Ram 1500 Hydro Blue Sport

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

Total fatal crashes: 5,897
Units sold in 2018: 536,980
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.43

No. 4 - Toyota Camry

2015 Toyota Camry Photo courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc.

Total fatal crashes: 4,734
Units sold in 2018: 343,439
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.59

No. 3 - Honda Accord

2017\u20132020 Honda Accord Hybrid Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

Total fatal crashes: 5,079
Units sold in 2018: 291,071
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.65

No. 2 - Chevrolet Silverado

2014 Chevrolet Silverado LTZ Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Total fatal crashes: 7,718
Units sold in 2018: 585,581
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.47

No. 1 - Ford F-Series

2018 Ford F-150

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Total fatal crashes: 10,845
Units sold in 2018: 909,330
Occupants killed per vehicle in a fatal crash: 0.46

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A new Chevrolet festival will feature the history of the Chevy brand.

Photo courtesy Chevrolet

With car shows and street cruising cancelled this summer, Chevrolet is spending a week celebrating all the culture of everything autos this week during a week-long virtual festival - Cruisin' the USA in your Chevrolet.

"Classic car events have served as a place for us to honor Chevrolet's deep automotive history and its influence on our present and future with car enthusiasts from around the world," said Steve Majoros, vice president of marketing, Chevrolet. "Cruisin' the USA in your Chevrolet is a way for us to keep that spirit alive."

Chevrolet Suburban The Chevrolet Suburban has been around since the early 1900s. Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Each day of the August 10-16 festival will incorporate a different theme. In addition to historic footage, guest appearances, and trivia, Chevy experts will provide in-depth looks at some of the brand's most iconic vehicles that are now housed at the General Motors Heritage Center. They'll even share their own custom Chevy builds.

The week starts by celebrating the origins of Chevrolet, in 1911 when Louis Chevrolet and Billy Durant formed the company. The rest of the week's schedule of events includes daily themes:

  • August 10: The Origins and Innovations of Chevrolet
  • August 11: Chevy's Most Iconic Designs
  • August 12: The Proud Truck Tradition
  • August 13: The Peak of Performance
  • August 14: Team Chevy – A Culture of Winning
  • August 15: Chevy's Heritage – A Fan Celebration
  • August 16: Race Day – Cheering on Team Chevy at NASCAR Cup Series at Daytona and Indy 500 qualifying races.

Children can join in on the fun by downloading specially-designed coloring pages, puzzles and activities from the Chevy Design School and exploring cool Chevy themes to outfit their Animal Crossing world.

To gear up for the event, fans can download a collectable 18x24-inch high-resolution printable poster featuring a 1967 C10 CST pickup, 1957 Corvette convertible, 2020 Corvette C8.R and 2020 Camaro ZL1.

Follow along on Chevy's social media channels – @Chevrolet on Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest, and @TeamChevy on Race Day – as we celebrate all things past, present and future Chevy. Consumers are also encouraged to share their own fan photos using the hashtag #ChevyLove.

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