Answering Your Questions

What is the 2020 Chrysler Voyager and why does it matter?

The Voyager has made its return to the FCA lineup for the 2020 model year.

Photo courtesy of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V.

The Voyager has returned. In June, FCA quiet revealed the Voyager during a press event at their Chelsea Proving Grounds, immediately allowing first drives and answering questions.

What is the 2020 Chrysler Voyager and why does it matter?

First, let's take a step back. Way back. And overseas.

Up until 2001, Chrysler had never sold the Voyager in the U.S. Starting in 1988, it was sold in Europe, having been rebadged from the Dodge Caravan name in the U.S. The automaker also sold a variant of the Caravan to U.S. customers dubbed the Plymouth Voyager. When Plymouth folded in 2001, a short-wheelbase version of Plymouth's minivan was sold under the Chrysler Voyager name but after two model years, it gave up the ghost.

2005 Chrysler Town & Country The new 2005 Chrysler Town and Country Minivan with the new "Stow 'N Go" feature is shown to the media at DaimlerChrysler headquarters December 8, 2003 in Auburn Hills, Michigan. The minivan-first feature allows owners to fold second and third-row seats into the floor with one-hand operation. Photo by Getty Images

There were then several evolutions in the minivan name and design, most notably the Dodge Grand Caravan and Chrysler Town & Country, which kept the minivan legacy started by the 1936 Stout Scarab alive.

Then Chrysler decided to switch things up and they ditched the Town & Country for the Pacifica, a completely different and thoroughly modern take on the minivan, starting in 2017. However, Dodge continued to sell its aging minivan, the Grand Caravan.

Since the Pacifica reveal, the Grand Caravan has been a mostly stagnant model. It doesn't have most of the safety features or high-tech equipment that the Pacifica has, nor is it as nice on the inside or fuel efficient.

Because it hasn't drastically changed in so long, FCA has not had to make significant investments to its production line to keep up with the evolution, or pay for things like new molds to be constructed. This makes the Grand Caravan relatively cheap to produce.

2012 Dodge Grand Caravan The Dodge Grand Caravan on the assembly line at the Chrysler Windsor Assembly plant January 18, 2011 in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Photo by Getty Images

In turn, the model continues to be the cheapest minivan customers can buy. And they're still buying it. In droves. The Dodge Grand Caravan outsold the Honda Odyssey in the third quarter of 2019 with 27,456 units, sitting atop its segment in sales. Chrysler only sold 21,697 Pacificas during the same period.

However, these times they are a changing. FCA is looking to modernize its lineup without losing those Grand Caravan customers. That's where the 2020 Chrysler Voyager comes in.

On the outside and inside, the Voyager is really just a Pacifica with another name. However, this version is more downmarket than the traditional Pacifica, with more economical materials and finishes. It is still much, much nicer than the Grand Caravan, and has many of the modern safety features the Pacifica has that the Grand Caravan does not. Safety is a top concern for families when they're looking to purchase a new vehicle according to Cars.com research.

The 2020 Dodge Grand Caravan starts at $27,040. The 2020 Chrysler Voyager undercuts that, coming in with a starting MSRP of $26,985. Chrysler sells the 2020 Pacifica with a starting price of $33,495.

2020 Chrysler Voyager

Photo courtesy of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V.

The Chrysler Voyager is a new addition to the FCA lineup for the 2020 model year.


It's safe to say that the Voyager is designed to be on its way to replacing the Grand Caravan. That's why it matters. It's a Band-Aid solution that gets FCA out of having to invest in designing and producing a completely new vehicle while still driving customers to their dealerships.

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The new Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross used the Internet of Things to connect to the My Mitsubishi Connect app

Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors North Americ

Mitsubishi has enlisted Aeris and Dealer-FX to better connect owners to their vehicles. Using integrations with the Aeris Mobility Services and Dealer-FX ONE platforms, the My Mitsubishi Connect mobile app will now enable Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross drivers to view real-time service and maintenance needs, as reported by their vehicles.

The system will push timely notifications from the vehicle to the app and the owner's smart mobile device allowing them to act in a matter of seconds rather than trying to remember that a warning light cane in while operating the vehicle.

"Mitsubishi customers are dreamers, achievers, entrepreneurs – active in their communities and in their family homes, and their time is extremely valuable," said Mark Chaffin, Chief Operating Officer of MMNA. "The My Mitsubishi Connect app allows us to enhance their experience, be more efficient with their time and continue to demonstrate our commitment to delivering high quality, top value vehicles with leading-edge technology in the U.S."

This isn't the company's first IoT foray. When it debuted, Mitsubishi Road Assist+ was the first hardware-free, smartphone-based app provided by an OEM that allowed owners to realize the cost savings of usage-based insurance without having to own "connected car" with built-in telematics capabilities or aftermarket-installed telematics hardware.

Mitsubishi continues to grow its presence in the U.S. market. The company recently relocated its headquarters from California to the Nashville, Tennessee area near where Renault-Nissan- Mitsubishi Alliance member Nissan has its North American headquarters.

The company recently announced a partnership with the Nashville Entrepreneur Center to create the Small Batch - Big Ideas Entrepreneur Network, which gives entrepreneurs the opportunity to learn from Mitsubishi executives, among other benefits.

The My Mitsubishi Connect and Mitsubishi Road Assist+ apps are currently available on the Google Play store and the Apple's App Store for use on Android and iOS devices.

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The Chevrolet Silverado will be offered with a new, multi-way tailgate for the 2021 model year.

Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Buyers love the GMC Sierra’s MultiPro Tailgate so it was only a matter of time before General Motors brought it over to the Chevrolet Silverado. That time has arrived.

Chevy will introduce the six-way tailgate on the 2021 Chevrolet Silverado at the end of the year. Instead of being known as the MultiPro Tailgate, the feature will be rebranded and called the Multi-Flex Tailgate. Yes, with the hyphen and everything.

The Chevrolet version of the tailgate really isn’t much different than the GMC version. The biggest difference is that it wears bow tie badging.

It’s functionality includes:

  • Primary gate — opens from the key fob, from inside the truck or via a button on the gate.
  • Primary gate load stop — helps prevent items from sliding out of the box.
  • Easy access — the inner gate folds down, allowing a deeper reach into the box.
  • Full-width step — the inner gate folds into a large step for easy access and holds up to 375 pounds.
  • Inner gate load stop — helps prevent second-tier items from sliding out of the box.
  • Inner gate with work surface — when opened, provides a work surface as well as second-tier loading.
It is likely that the Multi-Flex Tailgate will cost a premium when it arrives on dealer lots and it probably won’t be available on all Silverado models. In the video above, Chevrolet shows the tailgate on the Silverado High Country, its highest trim level.
In addition to the tailgate news, Chevrolet has already revealed that it will offer a Realtree Edition of the Silverado 1500 for the 2021 model year. It will feature familiar features and appointments that exemplify the Realtree brand.

The 2021 Chevrolet Silverado is slated to go on sale later this year.

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