Safety First

Volvo, Uber proclaim today as first National Seat Belt Day

Volvo invented the three-point safety harness in 1959, 60 years ago.

Photo courtesy of Volvo Car USA

Do you always buckle up when you're in a car? What about in a taxi or Uber? According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, four out of five adults say they don't always use a seat belt when taking short trips or when in the backseat of a taxi or ride-share vehicle.

Volvo Car USA, Uber, and the Governors Highway Safety Association have joined together to proclaim November 14 as National Seatbelt Day, in an effort to bring awareness to the benefits that seats belts provide.

"The safety belt is still among the most important safety features in the car today," said, Jim Nichols, Product and Technology Communications Manager, Volvo Car USA. "We are proud that the three-point safety belt has endured over the years and is now featured in every vehicle sold."

60th Anniversary of the Seat Belt ad Volvo, Uber, and GHSA are using this ad to help make riders aware of the benefits of using a safety belt.Image courtesy of Volvo Car USA

The three-point safety belt was launched by Volvo in 1959 and celebrates its 60th anniversary this year. Volvo estimates that the belt has saved a million lives since it debuted but notes that, " its effectiveness is only as good as its use."

In 2018 the rate of seat belt use in the U.S. was 89.6%, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Of the 37,133 people killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2017, 47% were not wearing seat belts. NHTSA research indicates that buckling up is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a crash.

It's important to remember that air bags are designed to work with seat belts, not replace them. Safety belts and air bags, as well as modern safety and driver assistance technologies and strong frame materials, are all part of a modern safety system that works together to keep vehicle occupants safe.

Atlas is one of Volkswagen's top-selling models in the U.S. and though it seems like just yesterday that it debuted on the heels of the Dieselgate scandal, the automaker is already preparing to give it a facelift.

Volkswagen has confirmed that the 2021 Volkswagen Atlas will sport a revised grille, head- and taillights, and front and rear bumpers when it arrives on dealer lots later in 2020. It will also have interior upgrades, and new driver-assistance and technology features.

Many of the refreshed elements come straight from the 2020 Atlas Cross Sport's design.

The three sketches that were shown as part of the tease show a more rounded, upright, and smirking grille at the front of the Atlas. Its headlights have a straighter LED light signature. The SUV's lower fascia has changed to show a more aggressive bottom half complete with the hint of a faux skid plate alongside repositioned and smaller fog light housings. Changes at the back aren't nearly as obvious.

2021 Volkswagen Atlas

Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

Volkswagen has released these sketches of the forthcoming 2021 Volkswagen Atlas.

VW has said that the changes add three inches to the length of the vehicle.

There aren't a lot of specifics about what potential buyers can expect from the interior upgrades but previous statements from Volkswagen indicate that there will be a new D-shaped steering wheel, an eight-inch infotainment touch screen, and wireless device charging.

Volkswagen will add new driver assistance technology to the model including adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go functionality and low-speed lane centering.

It's likely that the public's first look at the refreshed Atlas will come in February at the Chicago Auto Show.

Nissan is using Turo for extended test drives of new and late model Pathfinders.

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

The dealership model isn't changing, it's evolving. Cadillac recently announced the launch of Cadillac Live, a virtual vehicle shopping experience. Nissan has just launched a first-of-its-king test drive experience in partnership with Turo, a car sharing marketplace.

Consumers in Los Angeles, Northern New Jersey, and Salt Lake City can now experience extended test drives of new and late model Nissan models by reserving a model through Turo.

Nissan Turo screen Nissan has its own landing page on the Turo website.Photo courtesy of Nissan North America, Turo

"This gives shoppers a different way to experience a Nissan vehicle and all of its innovative technologies within the framework of their lives — driving the roads they frequently travel, running errands, and getting input from their family and friends," said Dan Mohnke, Vice President, Customer Journey & Data Innovation, Nissan North America, Inc. "Now you don't have to go to the test drive, the test drive can come to you. Today's consumers have new expectations for shopping and service."

Here's how it works:

  • Customers visit the Nissan landing page on Turo.
  • Customer schedules a booking that last for a few hours, a day, a weekend, or longer.
  • Independent Turo hosts as well as participating Nissan dealerships provide the like-new or late-model vehicles.
  • Eligible consumers who participate will be offered bonus cash of $300 toward the purchase of a new or certified pre-owned Nissan vehicle within six months of their test drive.

To be eligible for the bonus cash offer, renters must be Turo Approved Drivers who are legal U.S. residents age 25 and older with a valid driver's license. Renters must book on Turo and complete a trip in an eligible Nissan model year 2016 or newer vehicle between December 10, 2019 and June 30, 2020. Limit one offer code per household. Only residents of select counties in Ne Jersey are eligible. Those counties are Sussex, Passaic, Bergen, Hudson, Essex, Morris, Warren, Hunterdon, Somerset, Middlesex, Mercer, and Monmouth.

The bonus cash offer expires six months after receipt of offer code. The code is valid at participating Nissan dealers for $300 bonus cash on purchase of one eligible new or Certified Pre-Owned Nissan vehicle in dealer stock.