Super Bowl LIV

If a safety is scored during the Super Bowl, Volvo will give away $1 million in cars

Volvo is giving away $1 million in new cars if someone scores a safety during Super Bowl LIV.

Photo courtesy of Volvo Car Corporation

Whether you're rooting for the Chiefs or 49ers, you'll probably want to root for one of them to score a safety during Super Bowl LIV on February 2, 2020. During what the Swedish automaker is calling "Volvo Safety Sunday", if one team scores a safety during the game, random contest entrants will become winners.

According to Volvo, "A safety is a relatively rare and unpredictable scoring play in football that occurs when an offensive team is tackled, loses or fumbles the ball, or commits a penalty in their own end zone. The result of the play is two points to the defensive team, who receives possession of the ball via a free kick."

The campaign celebrate more than one million lives saved by Volvo safety innovations. The automaker has a number of safety innovations under their belt:

  • 1972: First rearward-facing child safety seat concept
  • 1991: Side-Impact Protection System (SIPS)
  • 1998: Whiplash Protection System (WHIPS)
  • 1998: Inflatable Curtain airbags
  • 2002: Roll-Over Protection System (ROPS)
  • 2003: Blind Spot Information System (BLIS)
  • 2008: City Safety collision sensing system
  • 2010: Pedestrian Detection with Full Auto Brake
  • 2013: Cyclist Detection
  • 2014: Run-off Road Protection
  • 2016: Connected Safety (Slippery Road Alert, Hazard Light Alert)
  • 2019: E.V.A (Equal Vehicles for All) Initiative and data sharing

To get entered to win, visit VolvoSafetySunday.com and design your own Volvo car. Submit a unique configuration code as an entry between January 20, 2020 and just before kickoff on February 2, 2020 to be registered.

Entrants can choose one of any 2020 Volvo models currently available in the U.S., in any trim and color.

Full rules, terms and conditions can be found at volvosafetysunday.com. a pledge to give away $1 million in cars if a safety occurs during football's biggest night on February 2, 2020.

Volvo, like other automakers, crash test their vehicles ahead of them making their way to dealership lots.

Photo courtesy of Volvo Car Corporation

Each year, an estimated 1.35 million people lose their lives in traffic accidents. Research by the World Health Organization shows that the risk of dying as part of a traffic incident is more than three times higher in developing countries than in developed countries.

Volvo Cars is calling on the United Nations to address the inequality. The company believes that the countries worldwide should promote safety belt usage by " introducing and enforcing seat-belt laws covering both front and rear seats." They also believe that the countries should develop infrastructure to separate motorized traffic from pedestrian and cyclist traffic.

" original_size="2500x1875" photo_credit="Photo courtesy of Volvo Car Corporation" alt="Volvo safety car test" expand="1"] Vehicles sold in the U.S. are extensively crash tested ahead of their debut on dealer lots.Photo courtesy of Volvo Car Corporation

"Global data shows that there is a significant inequality in road safety," said Malin Ekholm, head of the Volvo Cars Safety Centre. "Those safety gaps need to be addressed through technology, but also by creating and enhancing a global safety culture. We need to understand and address the variation in seat belt usage, while infrastructure should focus on improving the safety of vulnerable road users, pedestrians and cyclists."

The call to action has been announced as delegates from over 80 United Nations member states gather in Stockholm, Sweden to attend the 3rd Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety.

Volvo says that they are "keen to contribute to global road safety initiatives with its rich wealth of safety knowledge, as it has done for many decades in collaboration with governments, academia and regulators." This initiative has its roots in the 1959 introduction of the three-point safety belt, which the company took out an open patent on and promised not to enforce patent violations or charge others royalties to use.

In 2018 the rate of seat belt use in the U.S. was 89.6%, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Of the 37,133 people killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2017, 47% were not wearing seat belts. NHTSA research indicates that buckling up is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a crash.

Only 105 of the world's countries have safety belt laws that cover front and rear seat occupants. There are 195 counties on Earth.

Lax safety standards are one reason that automakers sell vehicles in markets in Asia, Africa, and Europe that they don't sell in the U.S. Those regions tend to have less stringent regulations when it comes to required safety equipment, technology, and structural integrity.

Additionally, there is less cost involved in the production of vehicles with fewer safety features so they may be sold to customers in less wealthy nations for lower prices than vehicles in the U.S.

Volvo invented the three-point safety harness in 1959, 60 years ago.

Photo courtesy of Volvo Car USA

Do you always buckle up when you're in a car? What about in a taxi or Uber? According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, four out of five adults say they don't always use a seat belt when taking short trips or when in the backseat of a taxi or ride-share vehicle.

Volvo Car USA, Uber, and the Governors Highway Safety Association have joined together to proclaim November 14 as National Seatbelt Day, in an effort to bring awareness to the benefits that seats belts provide.

"The safety belt is still among the most important safety features in the car today," said, Jim Nichols, Product and Technology Communications Manager, Volvo Car USA. "We are proud that the three-point safety belt has endured over the years and is now featured in every vehicle sold."

60th Anniversary of the Seat Belt ad Volvo, Uber, and GHSA are using this ad to help make riders aware of the benefits of using a safety belt.Image courtesy of Volvo Car USA

The three-point safety belt was launched by Volvo in 1959 and celebrates its 60th anniversary this year. Volvo estimates that the belt has saved a million lives since it debuted but notes that, " its effectiveness is only as good as its use."

In 2018 the rate of seat belt use in the U.S. was 89.6%, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Of the 37,133 people killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2017, 47% were not wearing seat belts. NHTSA research indicates that buckling up is the single most effective thing you can do to protect yourself in a crash.

It's important to remember that air bags are designed to work with seat belts, not replace them. Safety belts and air bags, as well as modern safety and driver assistance technologies and strong frame materials, are all part of a modern safety system that works together to keep vehicle occupants safe.