Astrology

What does your zodiac sign tell you about your vehicle choice?

Volkswagen has paired up vehicles with the zodiac sign that most embodies their spirit.

Photo by Getty Images

Over the weekend, Volkswagen published a list of its vehicle choices based on an individual's zodiac sign. AutomotiveMap has taken that a step further, adding to their list of recommendations based on what VW says are the characteristics of each astrological sign.

​Aquarius

Volkswagen Beetle

Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

Volkswagen: "Lively, sociable and original, you prefer the unconventional to the traditional. The Beetle, the quintessential Age of Aquarius car, is fun, unique and one-of-a-kind – just like you."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Kia Soul, BMW i3, Mazda MX-5 Miata

​Pisces

Hyundai Palisade

Photo courtesy of Hyundai Motor America

Volkswagen: "Intuitive, imaginative, creative and compassionate, you are escapist by nature. An iconic Microbus will give you the freedom to follow your whimsies and hit the road (and knowing your selfless ways, we're sure you'll have plenty of passengers). Known for your patience and empathy, you will feel good knowing that the microbus is anticipated to be reincarnated as an electric model – the ID. BUZZ – in 2022."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Hyundai Palisade, Jeep Renegade, Subaru Outback

Aries

Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

Volkswagen: "Adventurous, energetic and a bit of a trendsetter, you were the first of your friends to embrace EVs. The all-electric e-Golf is agile, fun to drive and designed to keep up with your active and energetic personality. Your sympathetic and courageous side will also feel good knowing your car is helping lower greenhouse emissions."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid, Porsche Taycan

​Taurus

Genesis G80

Photo courtesy of Genesis Motors

Volkswagen: "Reliable, practical and dependable, you want a car that's just as solid and steady as you are, and the Tiguan checks all the boxes. The mid-size, sporty SUV offers spaciousness combined with Volkswagen's hallmark driving dynamics and careful attention to detail (which, as a fellow meticulous planner, you can appreciate). Plus, its ergonomically-designed seats, heated side mirrors and available panoramic sunroof all appeal to your self-indulgent side."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Genesis G80, Honda Fit, Chevrolet Equinox

​Cancer

Honda Odyssey

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

Volkswagen: "Family-oriented and a homebody by nature, you crave a steady and spacious shell to get you from point A to point B. The redesigned 2020 Passat fits the bill. Known for your unwavering attention to detail, you will appreciate the midsize sedan's intricate balance of high quality, value and modern comforts."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Honda Odyssey, Hyundai Santa Fe, Subaru Forester

Leo

Dodge Challenger

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

Volkswagen: "Vivacious, theatrical and passionate, you are a charismatic, natural-born leader who loves basking in the limelight. Behind the wheel of the sporty, statement-making Jetta GLI, you are bound to make a splash. You have a palpable, high-energy and an ambition that can't be tamed and this bold, eye-catching sedan is the perfect ride to get you to new heights."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Porsche 911, Cadillac Escalade, Dodge Challenger

​Virgo

Hyundai Ioniq

Photo courtesy of Hyundai Motor America

Volkswagen: "Reliable, meticulous and modest, you desire a car that is practical, dependable and yet ever-so-slightly off the beaten track. Look no further than the Jetta. This sassy sedan offers all the features you require – easy handling, plenty of torque and a comprehensive suite of driver assistance technology – plus fun interior styling and a concert-quality stereo system."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Subaru Crosstrek, Hyundai Ioniq, Mini Cooper

​Libra

Lincoln Aviator

Photo courtesy of Lincoln Motor Co.

Volkswagen: "Clever, passionate and talented, Libras are going places and plan to get there in style. The Arteon, outfitted with frameless side windows and a wraparound grille, is the perfect blend of form and function – and a natural fit for the sign that places value on balance, order and equality."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Lincoln Aviator, Land Rover Range Rover Velar, BMW 2 Series

Scorpio

Land Rover Defender

Photo courtesy of Land Rover

Volkswagen: "Determined, powerful, passionate and endlessly curious, you need a sleek and sporty SUV to keep up with your bold and ambitious plans. Just like Scorpio, the Atlas Cross Sport emulates confidence and encourages spontaneity with its versatile cargo space that allows for everyday (and not-so-everyday) activities.

AutomotiveMap Picks: Kia Telluride, Land Rover Defender, Volvo V90

Sagittarius

Toyota 4Runner

Photo courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc.

Volkswagen: "Free-spirited, fun and focused, you seek out adventure and love a good road trip with friends. Enter the Atlas. A perfect complement to your work hard, play hard mentality, the seven-seater offers ample seating for friends and family to join you on your adventures."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Kia Niro, Nissan Altima, Toyota 4Runner

​Capricorn

Tesla Model 3

Photo courtesy of Tesla

Volkswagen: "Practical, prudent and ambitious, you're not going to blow your savings on some flashy status symbol. Your business-minded and want something that's sturdy and reliable but has flair. The beloved Golf GTI is the perfect workhorse, offering great handling, performance and comfort all for a reasonable price."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Lexus NX, Tesla Model 3, Mazda Mazda6

​Gemini

Genesis G70

Photo courtesy of Genesis Motors

Volkswagen: "Adaptable, adventurous, and versatile, you are the quintessential, and much beloved, Golf R: quick, fun and never dull. The hot hatchback also shares Gemini's dual personality – it's a practical, everyday commuter with a sports-car soul."

AutomotiveMap Picks: Volvo V60, Acura RDX, Genesis G70

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

This 1973 Volkswagen Thing has spent a great deal of its life in Wisconsin but is only allowed out when the sun shines.

Photo by Harvey Briggs

In the spring of 1971, Larry Nutson, then a young product planner for Volkswagen of America, walked into the meeting. He wasn't sure what to expect, but he certainly didn't suspect a Thing.

Director of Market and Product planning, Dr. Henry Braner had just returned from a vacation in Acapulco and was enamored with the VW Safaris he saw at the resorts and on the beaches. Dr. Braner was convinced Southern California's surfers and other adventurous individuals, who were drawn to the VW powered, Meyers Manx dune buggies of the era, would see the charm of what is officially called the Type 181, but became known in The States as the VW Thing.

1973 Volkswagen Thing The exterior of the model looks primed for wood paneling.Photo by Harvey Briggs

"I was fairly new at the company and couldn't have picked a better first project," said Nutson.

As part of the homologation team, Nutson was responsible for making sure the soon-to-be imported vehicle met not just the desires of the potential owners, but also the regulatory requirements in place at the time. That meant swapping out the taillights and turn signals with those from the contemporary Beetle, adding windshield wipers, and an approved steering column and steering wheel among other things. Emissions weren't an issue, because the Type 181 would use the currently approved Beetle engine and four-speed manual transmission. But it was pretty clear it wouldn't meet crash worthiness standards for passenger vehicles at the time.

Then someone had the brilliant idea to classify it as a "multi-purpose vehicle" like a Jeep. To do that they had to improve its off-road worthiness, so a 4.125:1 transaxle, 100-mm axles, heavy-duty CV joints, and knobbier tires were added to the mix.

At an approval meeting for the Thing with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), regulators expressed doubt about the vehicle's all-terrain capabilities since only the rear wheels were driven. Nutson, together with VW's lawyers by his side, remembers firing back, "Who says an off-road vehicle has to have four-wheel drive?" Without a good answer, NHTSA agreed with VW and the Thing was released to U.S. dealers in August of 1972 as a 1973 model.

1973 Volkswagen Thing Many do a double-take when they see a Thing coming down the road wondering what it is.Photo by Harvey Briggs

Interestingly, the Thing might not have happened at all had NATO completed a project they started about a decade earlier to create a "European Jeep". Pooling their resources, the NATO countries including Germany, Great Britain, Italy, and France were trying to design and build a light-duty patrol vehicle that could be used by various armies throughout the continent. The project stalled in the mid-'60s, so the West German Army turned to Volkswagen to quickly fill the void. In 1968 the 181 was commissioned into service. Eventually VW provided over 50,000 Type 181s to NATO from 1968 – 1983.

The fast-track nature of the project meant the Type 181 was quickly assembled out of parts from a variety of existing Volkswagen vehicles, taking its inspiration from the Kübelwagen (Bucket Car) used by the German military in World War II. The foundation of the Type 181 was the floor pan from a Karmann Ghia convertible with added reinforcement for off-road use. This gave it the interior proportions necessary to hold four people and the strength to support the wide-open top. Early 181s had a rear-swing axel suspension was from from the T1 Type 2 Transporter van, and the manual transmission and iconic air-cooled, flat-four engine came from the Type 1 Beetle.

It wasn't long before the Type 181 (and it's right-hand drive twin the Type 182) were adapted for civilian use and in 1971 sales began in continental Europe as the Kurierwagen and the Safari in Mexico, where drivers were looking for something a little more rugged than their beloved Beetles. Originally produced in Wolfsburg, VW added capacity in Puebla, Mexico to fill demand for the Americas – making the Thing the first vehicle ever imported from Mexico to the United States.

1973 Volkswagen Thing Though small, the car is spacious.Photo by Harvey Briggs

The Thing was as basic as basic gets. It was only available in three colors, Blizzard White, Sunshine Yellow, and Pumpkin Orange. It featured bolt-on fenders, doors that were interchangeable from front to rear, side curtains instead of windows, and a soft top designed to keep the rain out. Smart owners always kept a towel handy to dry up the inevitable leaks.

It didn't really matter, however, because most people saw it as a vehicle to be driven in the sunshine. This ethos was also reflected in the original heating system for the Thing.

Mounted just in front of the driver under the Thing's hood was a gasoline heater produced by Eberspächer. Working independently of the engine, this heater had its own small tank you filled and then fired up when you wanted to warm up the cabin. It mustn't have been a very popular feature, because in 1974 the system was replaced by the fresh-air heater used in the Super Beetle.

The 1974 model year also saw the introduction of a new color, Avocado Green, and the Acapulco Edition, with it's special blue and white paint scheme, striped seats, and a Surrey top. In 1975, its final full year on sale in the United States, you could add air conditioning, a radio and even a winch to your Thing.

1973 Volkswagen Thing The Thing keeps its engine in the back.Photo by Harvey Briggs

Comfort wasn't the Thing's strong suit. Neither was performance. Powered by a 46-horsepower, 1,584 cc engine, and only available with a four-speed manual transmission, 0-60 mph times were better measured by calendar than stopwatch. The top speed of 68 miles per hour meant it was freeway capable, but owners tended to eschew the interstates whenever possible.

Drum brakes at all four wheels provided adequate stopping power. And even though the swing axle had been replaced by Porsche double-jointed rear axles with the independent trailing arm rear suspension from the Beetle, handling wasn't its strong suit either.

So if comfort, performance, and handling were all – let's be generous and say – marginal, what was the point of the Thing? In order to find out, I used the magic of social media to contact several owners and even found a young woman who was brave enough to let me drive her unrestored 1973 Thing for a first-hand demonstration of its charm.

1973 Volkswagen Thing This vintage model wears its 1973 Volkswagen license plate frame with pride.Photo by Harvey Briggs

Jason Fogelson purchased his 1974 Thing in the early 1980s when he was working at Michael's Volkswagen in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Canoga Park, California as a salesman to earn money to pay for college. His love affair with the model began one day when Edd Byrns (Kookie in "77 Sunset Strip") drove onto the lot in a blue and white Acapulco Thing to look for a new car. He had a Siberian husky in the passenger seat and from that moment on Jason knew he had to own one.

A few months later, a customer came in to buy a new car and wanted to trade in his orange Thing. The dealership didn't want it so Fogelson arranged to buy it from him for $2,000. He cleaned it up and thoroughly enjoyed driving it around town for the summer.

But when school started in the fall, he quickly discovered the Thing was a lousy car to serve for his 20-mile commute each way. The heater was terrible, the top leaked, it couldn't keep up with traffic, and it was so loud he couldn't hear the transistor radio he brought with him to listen to the morning news. "I couldn't get rid of it fast enough," Fogelson said, but then followed up, "And if I could find another one today, I'd buy it in a heartbeat."

1973 Volkswagen Thing The Thing rides on 14-inch wheels.Photo by Harvey Briggs

Jeff Zurschmeide, an AutomotiveMap writer and known quirky, old car enthusiast – his current collection includes a classic MINI, a dune buggy, and a 1955 M38A1 Jeep – bought his 1973 Thing in the late 1980s for $1,500 when he was living in Santa Cruz. "The car played a pivotal role in my life," said Zurschmeide, "I took the woman who was to become my wife on our first date in the Thing. I stuck my copy of Endless Summer in the tape deck, pulled off the doors, flipped down the windshield and we cruised through town. She loved it, so I knew the relationship had a chance."

When the Loma Prieta earthquake struck in 1989, Zurschmeide discovered the utility and capability of the Thing. "It's a creditable off-road vehicle. I lived in the Santa Cruz Mountains very close to the epicenter of the quake. You'd drive along and there would be places where streams had changed course through a road or the ground had just sheared away and there was a six-inch step you had to climb up. The Thing just went everywhere."

Like Fogelson, he ended the interview by saying, "If an opportunity came up to get one in good shape for a good price, I would own another thing in a cold second."

Wanting to see and drive a Thing before writing this article, I had arranged to meet Wisconsinite Jennifer Mandich at the parking lot for our local baseball team, on a brisk but clear Wednesday morning.

1973 Volkswagen Thing The interior of the model is rather spartan.Photo by Harvey Briggs

Her 1973 Thing still wears its original and slightly faded orange paint. Her brother bought the car in Arizona and brought it to Wisconsin when he returned home. She'd been eyeing it for a few years while it sat in his garage undriven, and eventually convinced him to sell it to her. She drives the car only on sunny days and rarely puts up the top or takes the side curtains out from where they're stored, under the hood. The car itself is a survivor, with a few scratches, pits in the paint, and dents, but no rust thanks to her care.

The top has been replaced – something that almost all Things have in common – and the engine was rebuilt a few years ago. The interior is spartan, with the metal dashboard and simple seats with no headrest nor any side support. Legroom was adequate for my 6'3" frame, and as I started the car, all my VW memories came rushing back.

I've owned two Beetles, a Karmann Ghia, and a Type 3 Wagon, so everything about the Thing was familiar – the light clutch, the slightly rubbery shift feel, and the unassisted steering. There's a reason so many people of my generation learned to drive stick shifts in VWs, they are simple and forgiving with long clutch travel and an engine that's slow to stall. I took a quick spin around the empty parking lot to get a feel for the Thing and was completely unsurprised by any of its driving characteristics. And yet it was different from any VW I've driven in the way people reacted to it. It's a car that makes people smile, whether they're in the driver's seat, passenger seats, or on the sidewalk watching one trundle past.

1973 Volkswagen Thing This Thing, like so many others, has had its roof replaced.Photo by Harvey Briggs

Like my time behind the wheel, the Thing's availability in America was too short. 1975 saw the introduction of new safety regulations that made it illegal to sell regardless of its classification. In the three years it was on sale in the United States, 25,794 Things were sold. Many are still on the road today and they come up for sale regularly on sites like BringATrailer.com where prices range from a low of $6,300 to a high of $36,250 with most selling between $15,000 and $20,000 over the past three years.

If you're looking for an affordable classic that's loud, slow, uncomfortable and will make you grin from ear to ear every time you get behind the wheel, the VW Thing might just be your thing.

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Ford is bringing the Mustang Mach 1 back.

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

It was from a stage in Detroit a few years ago that Ford's then-CEO Mark Fields stood in front of several thousand journalists and proclaimed that the Mach 1 name was making a return. Fast forward half a decade and one new CEO and today the company is making it official.

The 2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1 will feature a 5.0-liter V8 engine giving global customers the option of buying a vehicle with a name that first shined during the golden age of muscle cars. Ford does not directly sell the 2020 Mustang Shelby GT500 in Europe so this new model could fill a hole in that market.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1 teaser spy photo Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

"Mach 1 has a special place in Mustang history, and it's time for this special edition to claim the top spot in our 5.0-liter V8 performance lineup and reward our most hardcore Mustang enthusiasts who demand that next level of power, precision and collectability," said Dave Pericak, director, Ford Icons. "Like the original, the all-new Mustang Mach 1 will be true to its heritage, delivering great looks and as the most track-capable 5.0-liter Mustang ever."

The Mustang Mach 1 first debuted in 1969. It carved a niche for the buying public - better performance than the Mustang GT with a price tag that made it cheaper the the Shelby or Boss grades.

"Mach 1 has always been that bridge between base Mustangs and the Shelby models," said Ted Ryan, heritage brand manager, Ford Archives. "From a style and handling perspective, the original Mach 1 managed to stand out as unique, even in the Mustang lineup – and as the name implies, it could really move."

Ford changed up the Mustang Mach 1 in 1971 and 1974 even offering an available Rallye Suspension Package. Then, it disappeared.

2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1 teaser spy photo Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

The name was revived for the 2003 and 2004 model years and featured a blend of modern power and 1970s-era nostalgic design. Its Mach 1 handling suspension with larger Brembo front-disc brakes improved on-road performance, while its matte black spoiler and hood stripe helped the coupe standout.

While Ford hasn't released many details of the new coupe model, it did release some teaser images including a close-up of the car's wheel. In that photo, the Mustang Mach 1 is wearing Michelin Radial X Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires sized 305/30ZR19 (98Y)($442.70 each on TireRack.com right now) that fit on 19-inch wheels. The car is wearing red Brembo calipers and five-double Y-spoke black wheels.

The car looks to have unique front and rear fascia though most of the body of the vehicle is straight from the 2020 Ford Mustang playbook. The two circular objects in the front of the car on the unique grille are a new addition, likely for additional engine bay cooling however there's some historical precedent for those spots to inhabited by lights. There's also a sizable spoiler and quad exhaust that look like they're straight from the GT500.

Seventeen years later, the all-new 2021 Mustang Mach 1 is set to return. on official debut date or pricing has been announced.

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