Silverstone Auctions

These are the best cars available at Silverstone Auctions Live

This Porsche 911SC is just one of the models going up for auction in May.

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The show/auction must go on. Silverstone Auctions Live will go online this year and while the masses under the tent will be missing, there will be plenty of vehicles available online for bidders to spend their money on.

The models on this list are the most interesting models set to cross the block at this year's Silverstone Auctions.

1968 Ford GT40

1968 Ford FT40

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The British-made Ford GT40 was recently named one of the best British cars of all time. The model up for auction at Silverstone is a 1968 Ford GT40 that was created as a homage during 2017 and 2018.

This isn't just a regular replica. It's Terry Drury's model. Drury was a privateer in the 1960s and he designed this model, which his company, now run by his son, made to his specification. The project started as a box of parts including a 320ci Gurney-Weslake Ford V8 and a ZF Le Mans gearbox. It eventually led to a box of original spare parts. Together, an accurate and faithful monocoque GT40 was made.

This model is expected to fetch £325,000 - £375,000 at auction.

1982 Ferrari 512 BBi

A single-owner 1982 Ferrari 512 BBi is also hitting the block. It's one of the 42 cars that was supplied to be sold in the U.K. by Ferrari in 1982. Under 1,000 512 BB models were produced in total.

The Berlinetta Boxer was one of the first Ferraris to feature a mid-mounted flat-12 engine. It's 5.0-liter produces 360 horsepower and is paired with a dual-late clutch.

The right-hand drive model is finished in a Rosso paint job and features a tan leather interior. In 1997, it underwent a restoration, gaining a fresh coat of paint. It features just 20,964 miles on the odometer.

It was eventually replaced in the Ferrari lineup by the Testarossa.

Silverstone Auctions expects the model to go for £175,000 - £220,000.

1974 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 Roadster

The 1974 Jaguar E-Type Series 3 Roadster is a beast. It roars to life thanks to its V12 engine and makes a splash on any highway or byway thanks to its Signal Red body color. The model features tinted windows, chrome wire wheels, and a works hardtop that was recently restored.

It has under 35,000 on its odometer. The car has been treated with Ziebart corrosion protection and detailed with a full Swissvax.

The model This is an immaculate, matching numbers, manual car with a Heritage Certificate.

Auction estimates are listed at £95,000 - £115,000 for the model.

1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale

1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

In the '60s, Alfa Romeo had some serious racing chops. Their models were known for being slippery and successful on the track. This left-hand drive 1960 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale is powered by a 1290cc four-cylinder engine that achieves 100 bhp and has a maximum speed of 124 mph.

The model is an early 1960 production that was first a road car then a race car. The Silverstone Auctions listing reads,

"During 2005, it was granted FIA papers (Period E /Class HGTS4) and in 2011, the little Alfa was imported to the UK to join a large private collection where it was campaigned by a prominent historic racer and carefully maintained by the collection's personal mechanic. In 2015, it was fitted with new FIA seats and belts but, as always with any competition car, it is essential that a new owner satisfies himself as to the legality, validity and currency of any racing-related equipment. An MSA/FIA Historic Technical Passport (Racing and Hill-Climb) was issued in 2015 and is valid until the end of 2025."

The car's registration dates back to 1967. It will be sold with that registration as well as the FIA/MSA HTP, Carta di Circolazione, CSAI Passaporto and Log Book (lots of interesting entries), and a Classic Car Taxatie (Dutch valuation) in addition to other documents.

It is estimated to get £55,000 - £65,000 at auction.

1965 Ford Cortina Lotus

A rare 1965 Ford Cortina Lotus is up for auction. It was built in May 1965 and went to an owner in Los Altos, California. The owner's file, which comes with the car, features a number of U.S. registration cars, the original Dealers Service Policy, and hand-written mileage and fuel logs.

The original owner kept the car until the early 80s before eventually making it to New Zealand in 2013. There, it underwent an "eight-stage sympathetic refurbishment over late 2013 and Spring 2014" according to its Silverstone Auctions listing.

In addition to the registrations and service records, the lucky buyer will also get an original Ford Cortina Owner's Manual, a Lotus Cortina Service/Workshop manual, a Brooklands publication containing contemporary road tests, an original factory Price List, a gear lever knob (that may be the original), and an invoice indicating the car had an oil and filter change and a fresh MOT on 16/06/2019.

The model is estimated to sell for £45,000 - £55,000.

1977 Porsche 911SC 3.0-Liter Targa ('78 MY)

From its Petrol Blue Metallic paint job to its targa top and black leatherette/black and white 'pin-stripe' velour interior, the 1977 Porsche 911SC 3.0-Liter Targa is a head-turner.

For the 1978 model year, Porsche offered a new model of the 911, the 911SC. Its "SC" designation stood for "Super Carrera". The car was able to get 180 horsepower from its 3.0-liter aluminum engine, which is paired with a five-speed transmission.

The vehicle's original buyer checked a number of options boxes on the model including impact absorbers, headlamp washers, leather steering wheel, colored windows, a centre console, and electric windows. There's no doubt the make, model, color, and options made it desirable, even for those with far fewer scruples than the general population.

According to the auction house, the car was stolen in the 70s with just 3,000 miles on the odometer. It would continue to be missing for a decade when it suddenly turned up with just over 1,000 more miles added. In mid-March 1987, the car was once again declared the properly of its original owner, after he paid Royal Insurance, WLY 185S a negotiated amount of £11,000. It would remain his property until 2005.

A series of owners and services later, the car now has 23,980 on its odometer.

Auction estimates for the model are £55,000 - £65,000.

1966 Lotus Elan S3 Historic Rally Car

This yellow 1966 Lotus Elan S3 historic rally car just screams fun. Just look at it.

The right-hand drive model features a JS Motorsport-built Lotus twin-cam engine under its hood that yields 152 horsepower. The list of additional equipment includes Koni and TTR shock absorbers /suspension, Monit trip meter, Sabelt 4-point belts, Minilite centre-lock wheels, a headed windshield, heavy-duty clutch, FIA fire extinguisher, hydraulic handbrake, big bore manifold, and an uprated prop/driveshafts.

It isn't just a historical model. The car is ready to are with fresh 10-year FIVA papers.

Silverstone Auctions puts the estimates at £30,000 - £35,000 for this model.

Trending News

Nuts & Bolts

 
 

Trending News

 
 

Alfa Romeo and the Italian police have a 70-year history, which includes this model, the Giulietta.

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

In the fifth episode of "Storie Alda Romeo", the company reveals how, for over 70 years, police officers in Italy have used the company's cars to perform essential job functions. Starting in the 1950s, Alfas were used as call-out vehicles, patrol models in U.S. terms, and became known as the "volanti".

Cars used by the State Police were nicknamed "Panthers" and those of the Carabinieri (military police) earned the nickname "Gazelles". Both terms were flattering and served as metaphors for the vehicles' power and agility.

The first Panther

1900, Police

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

Built in 1952, the first Panther was an Alfa Romeo 1900. The Gazelles began production a few years later.

The Alfa Romeo 1900 marked a lot of firsts for its maker. It was the first Alfa to have a self-supporting body and the first left-hand drive model. The car came with a four-cylinder engine, abandoning the six- and eight-cylinder power plants that had proved popular with buyers. The engine was powered by a single carburetor and delivered 80 horsepower (that was a good amount back then).

The 1900 was the first Alfa to be produced on an assembly line, which dropped the production time of one vehicle from 240 hours to 100. Many modern factories have been able to cut this time down to 48 to 72 hours.

It was agile and fast. The car was launched to the public with the slogan "The family car that wins races". It proved popular with buyers. Alfa sold more 1900s alone than the total number of Alfa Romeos it had sold up until the 1900 was produced.

Success in variety

Portello factory, 1900 production

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo attributes much of the 1900's success to product cycle management that is replicated time and time again in the modern market by companies worldwide. Alfa introduced several high-performance variants of the 1900 including the 1900 TI, 1900 C Sprint and Super Sprint, and the 1900 Super, winning important international competitions within their category.

Continued coachbuilder collaboration

BAT  Berlinetta Aerodinamica Tecnica

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

Even as the 1900 grew in popularity with the average buyer, the Alfa Romeo continued working with coach builders to launch concept cars, like the Berlinetta Aerodinamica Tecnica (BAT) on 1900 mechanics. The BAT was created by Bertone and designed by Franco Scaglione.

The Matta

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

The same engine as the one used in the 1900 was also adopted by the Alfa Romeo 1900 M, which is better known as the "Matta". Alfa made two different versions of the Matta from 1951 to 1954, one for civilians and one for military personnel.

It was a 4x4 that achieved 64 horsepower from its four-cylinder engine, which was paired with a four-speed manual gearbox.

In a similar vein as the Willys-Overland MB cum CJ-2A, several variants were produced for the agriculture, firefighting, and road maintenance industries.

The first Gazelle

Giulietta ti, Police

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

The Alfa Romeo Giulietta was the first Gazelle, which was designed as a patrol vehicle. It came equipped with a radio system so officers could stay in touch with headquarters. Even in most modern police vehicles, radios are a aftermarket accessory.

The Giulietta was shorter, narrower, and lighter than the 1900 and offered buyers a modern exterior that gave owners high levels of comfortability in the cabin. Its aluminum engine delivered 65 horsepower and the car had a maximum speed of 102.5 mph.

The car was a near instant success. It became known as "Italy's sweetheart" and sold over 177,000 units.

At the 1954 Turin Motorshow, a coupe version of the Giulietta debuted. Called the Giulietta Sprint, the model was designed by Bertone to be a low-lying, compact, agile car.

Enter: Giulia

Giulia, Police

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

As popular as Giulietta was, the Giulia was even more so.

The reasons for its popularity started at the front and rear, where, instead of beg but for style, they were designed to be shock-absorbent. This combined with a rigid passenger compartment to give drivers the comfort of knowing that they were in a safe (for its time) car. Many of these innovations were not yet compulsory.

Under the car's hood was a 1.6-litre twin cam engine. It had one one of the lowest coefficients of drag of its time, only 0.34. Alfa Romeo's marketing department capitalized on this, promoting the car as being "designed by the wind".

Sales of the vehicle were beyond expetation. The company sold over 570,000 sales, more than triple those of Giulietta.

Famous police cars

Giulia, "Carabinieri"

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Super was one of the most popular Alfas ever produced and one of the most famous Italian police cars ever produced. Other police cars from the Alfa lineup include the Alfasud, Alfa 75, and Alfetta Alfasud, Alfa 75156. Today, first responders drive the modern Giulia.

Trending News