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Stellantis sees Chrysler, not Pugeot, as its future in the U.S., bids adieu to SRT

The Chrysler brand will stay put, for now.

Photo courtesy of FCA US LLC

Which do you want first? The good news or the bad news? The good news is that the Chrysler brand will live on despite FCA's merger with PSA Groupe to form a new overarching parent company, Stellantis. The bad news is that the SRT standalone brand won't. Stellantis chief executive officer Carlos Tavares announced the changes during a roundtable this week.

It's not all bad news for SRT. The SRT brand will continue to live on as an identity within the company, attached to different brands as a marker of their performance models. This makes sense; it's the way most other automakers have done business. Maserati has Trofeo. Ford has ST. Hyundai has N.

Maserati Ghibli Trofeo The Maserati Ghibli Trofeo delivers the highest level of performance of any Ghibli on the market today. Photo courtesy of Maserati

A statement from the company indicated that the SRT team isn't going way. Its members have all been folded into the Stellantis global engineering operation. SRT's team had been partially responsible for the development of the Ram 1500 TRX, Dodge Dunrago SRT, Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk, and other high-performance models within the company's lineup so this move isn't too far out of their wheelhouse.

Evolving emissions regulations is something Tavares is keeping in mind as the company works to piece together the future of Dodge while keeping its performance-focused customer base in mind.

Tavares also said that plans to bring Pugeot to America have been put on ice following the merger. In 2017, PSA Groupe had announced that the company was slated to return to the U.S. by 2023.

The Stellantis family photo includes 13 different vehicle brands with Fiat, Chrysler, and Pugeot standing out to Tavares as pillars with long history and defined futures.

Unlike other automakers that are making promises for an all-electric or electrified future, Stellantis is ready to take an approach similar to Toyota - offer buyers the opportunity to get an electric model if they choose, but leave them with the option.

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The commercial van is going all-electric in 2023

Stellantis

Many automakers have publicly committed to making the shift to fully electrified vehicle lineups with the decade, but until recently, Stellantis was an outlier. The global auto giant, whose brands include Jeep, Ram, Dodge, Chrysler, Alfa Romeo, and more, will follow suit, but has been less aggressive with its stated goals. However, the automaker is already making good on its promises, and one of the first vehicles to come will be an electrified version of the Ram ProMaster van in 2023.


Ram ProMaster The electric ProMaster will compete with the Ford E-Transit.Stellantis


The automaker will follow its ProMaster commercial van with an electric version of the Ram 1500 pickup truck in 2024. When the truck eventually lands, it will face off against the Ford F-150 Lightning, Chevrolet Silverado EV, and GMC Hummer EV – a massively crowded field of vehicles, considering none are on sale today.


Ram ProMaster EVs make tons of sense for fleets, where fuel expenses can be steep.Stellantis


We don't have any specs on the new van yet, but its main competition will come from the Ford E-Transit electric van, which just began testing in fleets this week. Ford sent 10 pre-production vans to municipal and other fleets across the UK and a couple of other European countries. The E-Transit is estimated to deliver a range of about 126 miles and to offer a payload capacity of up to 4,290 pounds.


Ram ProMaster The ProMaster is just one of several electrified vehicles that Stellantis will release in the coming years.Ram


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Biden will target 50 percent of all vehicle sales for EVs by 2030.

Ford

In the last several months, we've seen automakers from all corners of the globe commit to some degree of electrification by the end of the decade and beyond. That includes the American Big Three: Ford Motor Company, General Motors, and Stellantis (Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, others). Today, President Joe Biden plans to throw his weight behind these efforts by signing an executive order that sets a goal of pushing the sales of zero-emissions vehicles to half of all vehicle sales in the U.S. by 2030.

Biden's target is not legally binding, but the industry is already jumping on board. In a joint statement, Ford, General Motors, and Stellantis confirmed that they aim to hit an EV sales volume of 40-50 percent annually. It's worth noting that the President's 50 percent goal and the automakers' sales targets also include plug-in hybrid vehicles, which still use a traditional gasoline engine.


Jeep PHEV The target also includes plug-in hybrid vehicles, which still use gas engines.Jeep


Auto unions and dealers are not opposed to the ambitious roadmaps laid out by the Big Three, but both have differing views on what is essential and how things will ultimately play out. While aware of the goals, the UAW is focused on wage growth and the preservation of jobs and benefits. It feels that an increase in EV production volume must happen here in the U.S. to include good-paying American union jobs.

Dealers, to a degree, are supportive of the goals but skeptical of their ultimate success. Some feel that electric vehicles do not present the earth-shattering shift in functionality and usability that other new products, such as smartphones, did in different industries. Regardless of concerns and skepticism, it appears that automakers are going all-in on the shift to electrification, so we're bound to see a wealth of new battery-electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles in the next few years.


GM battery facility rendering Automakers are pledging billions to increase EV and PHEV production volume.GM

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