Survey Says

Do you name your car? If you do, you're not alone

Skoda recently sponsored a poll of 2,000 U.K. car owners to find out what they've named their vehicle.

Photo courtesy of Skoda

Rhonda the Honda? Jack the Cadillac? Mamba the Mazda? Bullet the Mustang? Some of us have chosen to name our cars just for the fun of it while others have been pushed into it by registering their vehicle with the manufacturer's website to schedule maintenance.

A March 2020 poll of 2,000 motorists in the U.K. revealed that nearly a third of respondents have named their car. Thirty-two percent said that they have given their car a name, with a quarter of those saying that they have named three or more vehicles in their lifetime.

GOodyear car name generator graphic Goodyear has provided a helpful car name generator.Photo country of Goodyear

Some of the respondents divulged their vehicle names with 450 examples given. Some were repeats including: Betty, Freddie, Daisy, and Rosie. Other answers were more unique with Beyoncé, Harrison Ford, and Elvis Presley all being listed. Bubbles, Beast, The Brussel Sprout, Zorro, and Ketchup were also shared.

Other owners revealed that they had named their vehicles after family members or loved ones.

Why did they choose the names? The most popular reasons given was simply because it made the car owner chuckle (29 percent). Twenty percent of drivers picked a name because they thought the car looked like that particular name.

The survey also found that female drivers were almost twice as likely as male drivers to name their car, meanwhile, men were much more likely to use the name of a loved one or relative (12 percent) compared to women (six percent).

Where people live dictates how likely they were to give their vehicle a nickname. Thirty-seven percent of those living in the West Midlands named their model while 25 percent of those living in Scotland and Wales were likely to have the same behavior.

It's not unusual for owners to be attached to their vehicles but 10 percent of motorists surveyed said that they love their car more than their spouse or partner. One in seven said that the love of their vehicle superseded their love for their parents or siblings.

The survey was sponsored by Skoda.

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Toyota's Super Bowl LV ad features the story of a Paralympian.

Photo courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc.

By their own account, Toyota is sharing messages of hope, strength, and social responsibility during its Super Bowl LV ad. According to a new study conducted by DISQO, that's exactly what Americans don't want to see.

The 60-second spot, titled "Upstream", features Team Toyota athlete Jessica Long's long journey to success, which started when she was adopted by an American couple from a Russian orphanage. Soon after adoption, Long's legs would have to be amputated due to a rare condition.

Long is currently the second most decorated Paralympian in U.S. history. A five-second "billboard" within the ad encourages people to "think about the impact they have on those around them and follow Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) COVID-19 guidelines", according to a release.

Toyota Super Bowl Toyota's Super Bowl LV ad looks to strike a hopeful tone.Photo courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc.

Toyota Super Bowl LV ad paralympics

DISQO surveyed 8,432 people in the U.S. on February 1 and 2 to dermine their level of excitement about the Super Bowl and the activities and activations surrounding the game. The study found that 31.8 percent of people are less excited about this year's Super Bowl than previous editions.

Further, 23 percent of respondents said that they would watch the Super Bowl with a smaller group this year due to the pandemic and 17.3 percent will watch at home instead of going out like they traditionally would.

Just 15.9 percent of those surveyed said that they want want to see Super Bowl ads discussing social issues. The vast majority (83.2 percent) want the ads to be funny and/or entertaining.

Only 35.1 percent of respondents said that they want to see Super Bowl ads ahead of the game. "Upstream", like GM's Norway-centric spot, was shown ahead of the Big Game.

Toyota's ad was created by Toyota's agency of record, Saatchi & Saatchi, in partnership with Dentsu and directed by Tarsem Singh. It will air in the first position in the commercial break before the two-minute warning in the second quarter.

Last year, Toyota showed off its new Highlander in a commercial starring Cobie Smulders that struck a less serious tone.

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