Adventure

New film featuring adventurer Cory Richards celebrates risk-taking, quest for perfection

Photographer and adventurer Cody Richards has teamed up with Rolls-Royce to offer a glimpse into his world.

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

Cory Richards has had enough adventures to last a thousand lifetimes. He's dug himself out of an avalanche, summited Everest. and visited Franz Josef Land (an archipelago few have heard of, and fewer can find on a map). His story is one of survival.

A new film from Rolls-Royce features Richards and explores his quest for greatness, complete with tumbles to new lows. As part of the "Inspiring Greatness" seres, the short film showcases picturesque landscapes as Richards narrates telling audiences how he got where he is today.

Cory Richards National Geographic Richards has traveled around the globe capturing stunning moments with his lens for National Geographic.Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

Richards, a photographer for National Geographic, has had his photography take him all over the world – from the unclimbed peaks of Antarctica and the Himalayas of Nepal to the forgotten war zones of Angola, Uganda, and Pakistan. In 2011, he climbed Pakistan's Gasherbrum II, making him the only American, and one of only a few people, to climb the 8,000 metre peak, in winter. It was on this climb that he survived an avalanche on the descent, taking an extraordinary photograph of himself just moments after his recovery.

Though the film primarily captures his achievements, Richards is quick to point out while detailing his climb up Mt. Everest sans oxygen, "What makes it a great moment, is not standing on top. Every single piece that had to be put in place to make that moment possible; that is what greatness is to me."

As a company, Rolls-Royce strives to craft perfection, something Richards says resonates with him. In 2018, Richards took part in 'The Final Challenge' which followed his journey to some of the most remote parts of Scotland, the United Arab Emirates and the United States of America in a camouflaged Rolls-Royce Cullinan, testing it to the point of destruction and ultimately proving it highly capable on all types of terrain. Richards documented the challenge as Cullinan undertook these final trials ahead of its world debut in May 2018.

Torsten Müller-Ötvös, Chief Executive Officer, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, commented, "Cory Richards is an extraordinary individual. His skill behind the lens is unquestionably inspiring. The Final Challenge, documenting Cullinan's final grueling testing phase, perfectly captures Cullinan's 'Effortless, Everywhere' nature, in some of the world's most spectacular locations. This was an historic episode in Rolls-Royce's history – and one that we are delighted was captured by such a notable and talented photographer."

Other films in the "Inspiring Greatness" series feature Moving Image Artist Refik Anadol, Ndebele Artist Dr. Esther Mahlangu and Portrait and Fashion Photographer Rankin. See all the films here.

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The new, next-generation Rolls-Royce Ghost has been revealed.

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars this morning revealed the next-generation version of its Ghost sedan. The new Rolls-Royce Ghost carries over nearly nothing from the current model in a move designed to bring the automaker to the height of bespoke luxury while maintaining a heaping helping of brand identity.

The most technologically advanced Rolls-Royce yet reflects the company's "Post Opulent" design philosophy. It's a new take on what it means to have wealth, coming into fruition on a car that bears one of the oldest monikers in the company's lineup.

Rolls-Royce Ghost The car comes with all-wheel drive.Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

"The first Goodwood Ghost was a response to a whole new generation of clients, both in age and attitude. These men and women asked us for a slightly smaller, less ostentatious means to own a Rolls-Royce," said Torsten Müller-Ötvös, Chief Executive Officer, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars in a statement. "The success of the product we created for them fulfilled our most ambitious expectations. Over its ten-year lifespan, which began in 2009, Ghost has become the most successful model in the marque's 116-year history."

The design is simpler and more narrowly focused for the client. A Ghost owner isn't looking for the over opulence that a Phantom owner is, nor are they seeking the off-road prowess of the Cullinan. There's a certain simplicity and elegance to the design that maintains and builds on the expected super luxury experience.

Underpinning the new model is Rolls-Royce's aluminum Architecture of Luxury - the same as the Phantom and Cullinan. It has the world's first Planar Suspension System, which is designed to increase the car's agility while delivering an effortless drive experience. The Planar Suspension System replaces the traditional Magic Carpet Ride experience, advancing the achievement of a stable and serene ride after 10 years of development. The technology is reserved for Rolls-Royce despite the fact that the company is part of the large BMW Group family.

Rolls-Royce Ghost Rolls-Royce has achieved perfect 50:50 weight distribution in the model.Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

Some of the car's easy maneuverability is down to the car's 50:50 weight distribution. Rolls-Royce has made the Ghost longer and wider than before. These changes allow for all-wheel drive.

The Ghost's body is crafted from one piece of aluminum meaning there are no seams in the bodywork. One hundred percent aluminum laser-welded doors are in place on the model. The door structure saves weight compared to steel and keeps out more noise than steel would.

At its front is the company's signature Pantheon grille. In the new Ghost, it is down lit by 20 LEDs to illuminate Rolls-Royce iconography. LED and laser headlights flank the grille. The Spirit of Ecstasy has taken her traditional place on the hood.

The model is powered by the company's hallmark twin-turbocharged 6.75-liter V12 engine. It delivers 563 horsepower and 627 pound-feet of torque. Larger intake porting has allowed the engine to breathe better and pass along less noise to the cabin.

Effortless isn't just for the drive experience. The car's electronic doors now open and close (before they just glided shut with the press of a button).

Rolls-Royce Ghost

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

Rolls-Royce has tuned the car's interior components to a specific resonant frequency to increase the feeling of serenity for occupants. That tuning has led to a near-silent interior. Engineers toyed with a completely silent interior but found the result "disorientating" so a soft undertone was added.

Uniquely, the car is the first application of Rolls-Royce's Illuminated Fascia, which features the Ghost nameplate surrounded by over 850 LED "stars".

Rolls-Royce has given the car a Micro-Environment Purification System. The system channels all cabin air through a nanofleece filter.

Drivers sit behind the wheel and in front of a 7x3 high-resolution head-up display. The car also has a Wi-Fi hot spot, self-parking capability, navigation, and an entertainment system.

Rolls-Royce Ghost The car retains the available Starlight Headliner.Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

Rolls-Royce has given the car a bespoke 18-channel 1,300-watt audio system. The system features exciter and cone-type speakers, all bonded to the surface of an object.

It has a 17.9 cubic foot trunk giving the model more space than a Honda Accord, Hyundai Sonata, and most versions of the BMW 5 Series.

The car comes with a number of safety features including vision assist with day- and night-time wildlife and pedestrian warning, alertness assist, a four-camera system with panoramic and helicopter view, adaptive cruise control, collision warning, cross-traffic alert, and lane departure and change warning.

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The Rolls-Royce Ghost will be the first model to feature the technology.

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

At the Home of Rolls-Royce in Goodwood, West Sussex, England. Artisans, designers, engineers, and craftspeople work together to anticipate the desires of the company's high-end clientele. Not only are they charged with coming up with extraordinary offerings meant to appeal to the upper crust, they need to deliver customization options that are different from every other automotive manufacturer.

The coach builders extraordinaire at Rolls-Royce have spent two years and over 10,000 hours to deliver Illuminated Fascia. The feature will make its debut in the forthcoming Rolls-Royce Ghost on September 1.

Rolls-Royce Ghost sketch The next-gen Rolls-Royce Ghost will debut later this year Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motors Cars

"Illuminated Fascia is perfectly in tune with the Post Opulent design direction we pursued with new Ghost," said Michael Bryden, Lead Bespoke Designer, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars. "This elegant and minimal aesthetic is a specific response to the layer of clients who respond to Ghost: men and women who share a desire for a clean, pared-back expression of Rolls-Royce. Like the rest of the motor car's progressive design, this hidden-until-lit feature hides the complexity required to create a sense of effortless luxury with a simple decorative statement."

The fascia consists of 850 "stars" that illuminate on the dashboard, glowing and surrounding the model's name. The design is meant to echo the available Starlight Headliner in Rolls-Royce models that has become nearly as synonymous with the company's deign as the Spirit of Ecstasy and Pantheon Grille.

Crafting the Illuminated Fascia came from the design brief for Ghost. With the new car, designers set out to "pursue a Post Opulent design direction". The idea for the fascia came straight from the mouths of current Ghost owners. Superficial detailing was set aside for a more bespoke creation - one that does not use screens technology but rather a system of 152 LEDs mounted above and beneath the fascia, which are meticulously color-matched to the cabin's clock and instrument dial lighting.

A two millimeter thick light guide consisting of more than 90,000 laser-etched dots is used to ensure that the Ghost logo is lit evenly. This allows future Ghost owners to enjoy a twinkling effect as the eye moves across the element.

When the car is not operation, the Illuminated Fascia simply disappears into the background. To achieve this, the company used three layers of composite material: Piano Black substrate that laser etched to remove the black coloring is overlaid with a layer of dark tinted lacquer then the whole area is sealed with a subtly tinted lacquer before being hand-polished to achieve a perfectly uniform 0.5 millimeter-thick high-gloss finish.

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