Road Trip

5 tips for road tripping during the COVID-19 pandemic

Navigating the ins and outs of a road trip during a pandemic can be tricky.

Photo by Jovanmandic/Getty Images

America is getting out, stretching their legs, willingly being cooped up in their car for hours rather than their homes. That's right, it's road trip time. Before you head out on the road, there's a few things you need to consider for traveling during this national health crisis - take it from someone who just got back from a lengthy road trip.

Check local regulations.

Not only do states have different regulations, there are variances between counties and towns as well. Check the regulations the day before you leave - they're prone to changing quickly. While some regulations effect dining hours and service, some impact things like public restrooms, wearing a face mask, and public gatherings.

Make planned stops.

Waitress with face mask serving family with children outdoors in summer on terrace restaurant


Photo by Halfpoint Images/Getty Images

Don't just play it by ear when it comes to bathroom breaks and meals. Planning ahead will help you determine what is open and where, as well as the regulations that come with dine-in service versus take out. Remember, not all service station bathrooms are open and you might not be able to just pop in to a fast food restaurant for a bathroom break. Many rest stops and parks also have closed bathrooms.

Remember to bring cash.

With the coin shortage and the switchover to cashless payment for most businesses, it's important to remember that tolls booths still run mostly on cash-only service. Bring an assortment of bills (lots of ones, not as may fives and tens) and coins to help you achieve exact change when going through toll booths to ensure that you don't have to get change and expose yourself (and the tollbooth worker) to additional risk.

Pack personal protective equipment and other supplies.

Young mother squeezing hand sanitizer onto little daughter's hand in the playground to prevent the spread of viruses

Photo by d3sign/Getty Images

If you have a few days before your trip, consider ordering a package of disposable face masks to keep in your glovebox or center console. You'd be surprised how easy it is to spill on your usual mask, drop it in a parking lot, step on it, or get it stuck between the seat and center console. What if it suddenly breaks? It's good to have a back up. The last thing you want to do is arrive at your destination out of luck.

Check and double check your car's emergency gear.

Being self-reliant is more important than it has been in recent memory. Before you set off, double-check the situation of your spare tire, making sure that you'll have the tools on-hand to change out a flat on your own if you need to. Don't remember how to change one out? Watch some YouTube videos and brush up on your skills.

You may want to consider purchasing a roadside rescue kit as well. These usually contain jumper cables, a shovel, reflective sign, tools, a flashlight, and more to help in the event of an emergency.

Refill fluids that need it. Stock the first aid kit and make sure that you have a few bottles of water and a clean cloth or two in reserve just in case.

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What was your best car-related experience this year?

Chris Teague

This year has been a lot of things, but it hasn't been boring. Even if we focus only on the car world, there's plenty to talk about, from microchip-related new vehicle shortages to the wave of new electric vehicles hitting the market. That leaves us with a question for all of you: What was the best or most memorable car moment for you in 2021? I'll get the conversation started.

Porsche Cayenne GTS My SoCal Cayenne śaw snow for the first time in its nearly 200k-mile life last week.Chris Teague

I'd spent a good portion of 2021 wanting a new-old car to drive when I wasn't testing a new vehicle. That's harder than you'd think for someone who thinks, talks, and writes about cars all day, because there are so many interesting, risky, and downright funky options out there in every price range. The added headache for me was that I'd chosen to shop for a "fun" car in one of the most volatile car markets ever seen. Even the extremely high-mileage "untouchable" European cars I wanted to buy were commanding ridiculous prices.

After a solid few months of waffling between various rattletrap Mercedes-AMG, BMW M, and Audi S/RS cars, I landed on an option that had escaped me before: The Porsche Cayenne. First-generation Cayennes are a real bargain now, but the 955/957 (Porsche's internal code for the SUVs) can experience major problems that occur with or without regular maintenance and care. I was determined to buy one, and wasn't overly concerned about mileage, as long as I could count the number of owners on one hand. There was a beautiful 2009 Cayenne GTS with 90,000 miles but nine owners, a gorgeous 2004 Cayenne Turbo with a concerning engine tick, and many more just like them. Finally, I decided to risky-click a 196,000-mile Cayenne GTS in Southern California. It had one owner and one dealer-owner for a month or two prior to sale, its condition looked decent in photos, and I was able to negotiate a reasonable enough price that shipping it from San Diego to Maine wasn't a huge problem.

Porsche Cayenne GTS The pics look great, but hands-on tells another story.Chris Teague

I had two traveling Euro mechanics check the car out, and both confirmed that it was well-worn but mechanically sound, so I jumped. Ten days later, on a snowy, icy, dark Maine afternoon, the Cayenne arrived. Cosmetically, there were a few things the dealer and mechanics failed to mention, but overall, it looked good. The SUV passed Maine safety and emissions testing without problem, got a new set of Michelins, and I was on my way.

Porsche Cayenne GTS I'm in danger, but thankfully this should be a reasonable fix.Chris Teague

A few days of driving revealed what I was really in for. A check engine light revealed a camshaft position sensor error and the Cayenne displayed a nasty vibration at idle. A new sensor and motor mounts, and I'm on my way. I'll update you as more things break or miraculously work, but I want to hear your memories from 2021.

Email me at chris@automotivemap.com, and I will compile the best and most interesting stories for a story on New Year's Day. May you all have a wonderful 2022.

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New electric pickup truck

GMC Hummer EV deliveries to start soon

Hummer EV deliveries will start in December.

GMC

This year has turned out to be as difficult for automakers as 2020 was, if not much more so. The pandemic is still a major factor, and to make matters worse there's a global microchip shortage that heavily impacts automakers' ability to build tech-heavy vehicles. GMC has a big launch left to handle in 2021, and according to a recent call with journalists, it's proceeding as planned. On a recent call with reporters, GMC exec Duncan Aldred noted that Hummer EV pickup deliveries are on track to begin in December. He also elaborated on the truck's EPA range numbers.

2023 GMC Hummer EV The trucks will deliver up to 329 miles on a charge. GMC

The Hummer's EPA range lands at 329, not far from the 350 miles General Motors targeted for the vehicle. Those are the estimates for the limited Hummer Edition 1, which carries a six-figure price tag and gobs of bells and whistles. Aldred said that other models coming later on will offer longer range estimates when they hit the roads sometime in 2023.

A staggering 80 percent of reservations GMC has gathered so far are for the Edition 1 model. Almost half of the 125,000 people who have inquired about the Hummer EV have placed the refundable $100 deposit and the SUV's first year of production is completely sold out.

2023 GMC Hummer EV The Hummer EV's first year of production is sold out. GMC

When it hits the streets later this year, the Hummer EV will be just in time to face off against a growing crop of EV trucks and SUVs. Rivian recently began delivering the R1T electric pickup truck and will continue with the R1S SUV next year. The Ford F-150 Lightning is coming in 2022, and General Motors itself has a Cadillac EV rollout to handle in 2022. Chevy and GMC will show off electric versions of the Silverado and Sierra pickup trucks on January 5 and GMC will push the Hummer SUV EV in 2023.

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