Reimagined

Icon 4x4 gives 1970 Ford F100 a potent power boost, makes it just modern enough

Icon 4x4 has given this vintage Ford F100 the full treatment

Photo courtesy of Icon 4x4

Los Angeles-based Icon 4x4 has launched the next model in its Reformer series, a reimagined version of the 1970 Ford F100 short bed pickup truck. The fresh model combines classic styling with modern engineering. In the end, it's a thoughtful redo rather than just a well-financed restomod.

"At Icon 4x4, our Reformer series is a distinctly unique approach to classic restoration, and this new 1970 Ford Ranger is a perfect example of how we work with clients to completely reimagine trucks like these on every level," said Jonathan Ward, Lead Designer and Founder of Icon 4x4. "What we're doing is rewriting history to a certain extent by creating a bespoke truck that can serve as a daily driver with timeless style, modern engineering, and none of the sacrifices commonly associated with conventional restorations."

The model keeps its original paint color.Photo courtesy of Icon 4x4

Icon starts out every job by completing a series of renderings that show off the vehicle's various angles. From there, their in-house engineering and design teams develop a full CAD model and complete with specifics about wiring and other details that make the vehicle complete. At long last, the build process can begin.

This particular truck was found on Craigslist wearing its original paint and interior. Icon 4x4's client didn't always want a Reformer but, as these things go, after putting on a few miles the truck pre-restoration, he fell in love and decided that he wanted to maintain much of the original character of the truck.

To protect the exterior, Icon 4x4 coated the Ranger's floorboards with a polyurea floor surface coating, and every body panel was powder coated prior to paint for enhanced corrosion protection. It wears stock colors that have been given a thorough refresh. Most of the trim is original though where it used to say "Sport Custom" in script on the bed, it now says "Icon Custom".

Below its hood is a 426-horsepower Ford 5.0-liter Coyote V8 engine. That's paired with a Ford four-speed automatic transmission with overdrive.

There's a four-link rear suspension system and at the front are radius arms. Eibach coil springs and Fox shocks were added to improve drive handling and comfort.

Icon Reformer Ford Bumpside F100 4x4

Photo courtesy of Icon 4x4


It has a twin-stick Advance Adapters Atlas II transfer case and PSC power steering underneath. The 18-inch forged aluminum wheels are attached to Dynatrac ProRock axles, a 44 up front and a 60 in the back. The wheels were inspired by the truck's original steelies, complete with vintage hubcaps. It rides on BFGoodrich all-terrain tires.

Icon n4x4 engineered a hydroboosted sport brake system with Brembo specifically for the model, which includes large rotors and calipers.

All the new parts give the vehicle the biggest change in ride and drive quality of any vehicle Icon has ever produced.

The inside of the truck has gotten just as much of an upgrade. It features a new digital gauges, a Vintage Air Gen IV climate control system, and bespoke chrome aluminum knobs and bezels. There's also Icon brand badging throughout. Icon did not install power windows, at the request of the owner.

The cabin is appointed with Maharam textiles and leather by Relicate that is designed to match the truck's factory vinyl. All materials have been hand-sewn by Icon 4x4.

Before it is ready to be handed off, Icon 4x4's team test drives the car 2,000 to 3,000 miles in a variety of environments to ensure it's ready to go.

Icon says that in most cases, their Reformer models retain the title year and legal entity of the donor vehicle.

Check out this in-depth look at the truck from the Icon 4x4 team:

BEHOLD! The ICON Reformer Ford Bumpside F100 4x4 in 4K www.youtube.com

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Alfa Romeo and the Italian police have a 70-year history, which includes this model, the Giulietta.

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

In the fifth episode of "Storie Alda Romeo", the company reveals how, for over 70 years, police officers in Italy have used the company's cars to perform essential job functions. Starting in the 1950s, Alfas were used as call-out vehicles, patrol models in U.S. terms, and became known as the "volanti".

Cars used by the State Police were nicknamed "Panthers" and those of the Carabinieri (military police) earned the nickname "Gazelles". Both terms were flattering and served as metaphors for the vehicles' power and agility.

The first Panther

1900, Police

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

Built in 1952, the first Panther was an Alfa Romeo 1900. The Gazelles began production a few years later.

The Alfa Romeo 1900 marked a lot of firsts for its maker. It was the first Alfa to have a self-supporting body and the first left-hand drive model. The car came with a four-cylinder engine, abandoning the six- and eight-cylinder power plants that had proved popular with buyers. The engine was powered by a single carburetor and delivered 80 horsepower (that was a good amount back then).

The 1900 was the first Alfa to be produced on an assembly line, which dropped the production time of one vehicle from 240 hours to 100. Many modern factories have been able to cut this time down to 48 to 72 hours.

It was agile and fast. The car was launched to the public with the slogan "The family car that wins races". It proved popular with buyers. Alfa sold more 1900s alone than the total number of Alfa Romeos it had sold up until the 1900 was produced.

Success in variety

Portello factory, 1900 production

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo attributes much of the 1900's success to product cycle management that is replicated time and time again in the modern market by companies worldwide. Alfa introduced several high-performance variants of the 1900 including the 1900 TI, 1900 C Sprint and Super Sprint, and the 1900 Super, winning important international competitions within their category.

Continued coachbuilder collaboration

BAT  Berlinetta Aerodinamica Tecnica

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

Even as the 1900 grew in popularity with the average buyer, the Alfa Romeo continued working with coach builders to launch concept cars, like the Berlinetta Aerodinamica Tecnica (BAT) on 1900 mechanics. The BAT was created by Bertone and designed by Franco Scaglione.

The Matta

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

The same engine as the one used in the 1900 was also adopted by the Alfa Romeo 1900 M, which is better known as the "Matta". Alfa made two different versions of the Matta from 1951 to 1954, one for civilians and one for military personnel.

It was a 4x4 that achieved 64 horsepower from its four-cylinder engine, which was paired with a four-speed manual gearbox.

In a similar vein as the Willys-Overland MB cum CJ-2A, several variants were produced for the agriculture, firefighting, and road maintenance industries.

The first Gazelle

Giulietta ti, Police

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

The Alfa Romeo Giulietta was the first Gazelle, which was designed as a patrol vehicle. It came equipped with a radio system so officers could stay in touch with headquarters. Even in most modern police vehicles, radios are a aftermarket accessory.

The Giulietta was shorter, narrower, and lighter than the 1900 and offered buyers a modern exterior that gave owners high levels of comfortability in the cabin. Its aluminum engine delivered 65 horsepower and the car had a maximum speed of 102.5 mph.

The car was a near instant success. It became known as "Italy's sweetheart" and sold over 177,000 units.

At the 1954 Turin Motorshow, a coupe version of the Giulietta debuted. Called the Giulietta Sprint, the model was designed by Bertone to be a low-lying, compact, agile car.

Enter: Giulia

Giulia, Police

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

As popular as Giulietta was, the Giulia was even more so.

The reasons for its popularity started at the front and rear, where, instead of beg but for style, they were designed to be shock-absorbent. This combined with a rigid passenger compartment to give drivers the comfort of knowing that they were in a safe (for its time) car. Many of these innovations were not yet compulsory.

Under the car's hood was a 1.6-litre twin cam engine. It had one one of the lowest coefficients of drag of its time, only 0.34. Alfa Romeo's marketing department capitalized on this, promoting the car as being "designed by the wind".

Sales of the vehicle were beyond expetation. The company sold over 570,000 sales, more than triple those of Giulietta.

Famous police cars

Giulia, "Carabinieri"

Photo courtesy of Alfa Romeo

The Alfa Romeo Giulia Super was one of the most popular Alfas ever produced and one of the most famous Italian police cars ever produced. Other police cars from the Alfa lineup include the Alfasud, Alfa 75, and Alfetta Alfasud, Alfa 75156. Today, first responders drive the modern Giulia.

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