Classic & Vintage

Ranked: Britain’s best classic cars

Brits recently ranked the best classic cars to come from their neck of the woods.

Photo courtesy of Hagerty

Classic car insurer Hagerty put out the call, asking the public to vote on its the best British classic cars of all time. The initial list, compiled in conjunction with a respected panel of automotive journalists, shortlisted 10 models. Then, 1,150 votes were cast by enthusiasts to determine a winner.

Scroll down to see them all.

No. 10 - Jaguar D-Type

Photo courtesy of Jaguar

The Jaguar D-Type is a slippery sports car, designed to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the mid-'50s. Thrilling mechanics aside, the car's styling was airplane-like and honed for speed. That's not why it's best-known, however.

The D-Type was just ramping up production when its factory was engulfed by fire in 1957. Twenty-five of the models were in various stages of completion at the time and the fire destroyed nine of them.

Today versions of the car have sold for nearly $20 million but in the late 50s, by the time it had gone out of fashion, the models were changing hands for as little as $5,000.

No. 9 - Land Rover (Series I)

Photo courtesy of Land Rover

Land Rover has long held a place in the heart of true off-roaders. That spark all started with the Land Rover, made by the Rover Company, in 1948 following an introduction at the Amsterdam Motor Show. When it entered production, the model was the first mass-produced civilian four-wheel drive car with doors. That first generation had an 80-inch wheelbase and was powered by a 1.6-liter gasoline engine.

No. 8 - Lotus Elan (MkI)

Peter Sellers And Britt Ekland Lotus Elan

Photo by Jim Gray/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The Lotus Elan was produced starting in 1962 in Cheshunnt, England. It got its power from a 1.6-liter engine and came equipped with four-wheel disc brakes, a four-wheel independent suspension, and rack and pinion steering.

Here, English actor Peter Sellers (1925 - 1980) presents a Lotus Elan to his fiancée, actress Britt Ekland on February 12, 1964.

No. 7 - Ford GT40

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Ford may be an American company, but the GT40 MkI, MkII, and MkIII were designed and built in England. It was the GT40 that was part of the famous Ford vs. Ferrari endurance racing battle, and the precursor to the modern Ford GT supercar.

No. 6 - Jaguar XK120

Photo courtesy of Jaguar

When it debuted in 1948, two-seater open-air Jaguar XK120 was Jag's first sports car since the SS 100 ran out of steam nine years earlier. Made in Coventry between 1948 and 1954, the car first featured a wood body but in 1950, that was replaced by steel. Eventually, the model would be available in three body styles and be used for rallying as well as racing.

Male model David Gandy's restored 1954 XK120 is pictured.

No. 5 - Aston Martin DB4 GT

Photo courtesy of Aston Martin

The DB4GT made its debut in 1959, the grand touring version of the DB4 that was primarily intended as a race car. That year, it won a GT race at the Daily Express Silverstone May meeting, driven by Stirling Moss.

It's shorter than the DB4 by five inches and 185 pounds lighter. The GT has a top speed of 160 mph thanks to its 302-horsepower engine and can go from a standstill to 100 mph and back in 20 seconds.

Just 94 models were made.

No. 4 - Aston Martin DB5

Photo courtesy of Aston Martin

The Aston Martin DB5 is the first road-going vehicle by the manufacturer to have a 4.0-liter version of Tadek Marek's twin-cam straight-six engine. That power plant was first seen in the Lagonda Rapide and the DP215 race car. It was capable of getting up to 150 mph.

The DB5's owner's manual cautioned the driver: "It is respectfully suggested that the car be driven with extra care until the owner has become thoroughly attuned to its high level of performance … When the response of the car has been measured, it will be proved that the car behaves impeccably and safely."

When it was tested, Motor magazine declared: "We can confirm the makers' implication that the DB5 is an acquired taste, perhaps even disappointing at first to some people, but once savoured to the full, never forgotten and almost impossible to replace."

No. 3 - Mini

Photo courtesy of Hagerty

The Mini has its roots squarely in British history. From 1959 to 2000, the model was produced by the British Motor Corporation and assembled in Birmingham. It reached peak acceptance quickly, becoming a staple in fashionable 1960s London thanks in large part to its spacious passenger area. Last year, MINI celebrated its 60th birthday.

No. 2 - Austin-Healey 3000

Austin-Healey 3000

Photo courtesy of Hagerty

This big British sports car came in a variety of models during its run in the late 1950s and 1960s. Despite their popularity in their home country, it wasn't just Brits that were fans of the Austin-Healey 3000. In 1962, nearly 92 percent of the 3000s made were exported, predominately to North America. They were assembled in Abington, England and strutted their stuff on race tracks across the world, winning prizes at major racing circuits.

No. 1 - Jaguar E-Type

Photo courtesy of Hagerty

There isn't a car like it on the market today. The Jaguar E-Type successfully combined looks, power, performance, and a competitive price tag to quickly race into the hearts of British buyers. It had a top speed of 150 mph and could get from zero to 60 mph in less than seven seconds.

When it was released in 1961, Enzo Ferrari called it, "the most beautiful car ever made."

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Motul has released a new line of lubricants for "rad" era vehicles.

Photo courtesy of Motul

Motul has been around for 168 years, far longer than automobiles. The new Classic Line of lubricants have been specifically formulated for cars slightly newer, those that are members of the "rad" era. Motul's Classic Line features oils, detergents, and additives that the company has engineered to enhance the performance of older powertrains while offering improved protection.

Each Classic Line lubricant features an additive package with high-zinc (ZDDP) and molybdenum (moly) for reduced friction and increased power. Synthetic base oils and adapted detergent levels of each formulation are suited for metals and gasket materials that are common of the era of vehicle manufacturing. Advanced additives ensure that the lubricants meet or exceed American Petroleum Institute (API) standards.

Motul Eighties 10W30 Motul's Eighties formulation is made for forced induction engine vehicles.Photo courtesy of Motul

The Classic Line's products have high-adhesion properties that are designed to provide excellent cold flow properties to prevent engine wear during start-ups and to coat and protect engine internals and running gear during the periods of prolonged storage that collector vehicles often experience.

Motul Modern Classic Eighties 10W40 meets the needs of forced induction engines while Modern Classic Nineties 10W30 was designed for the demands of high-revving engines with more modern valvetrains. Both Modern Classic oils are the first products to offer high ZDDP and moly for "rad" era collector cars from these two decades.

To get the new 2100 Classic Oil 15W50, Motul revised its 2100 oil to better lubricate and protect naturally aspirated and forced induction engines with flat tappet cams common to the vehicles in the 1970s and beyond.

Motul Classic 10W50 Classic vehicles have different needs and their lubricants have a different formation than Eighties and Nineties branded oils.Photo courtesy of Motul

Classic Oil 20W50 is designed for hot rods, muscle cars, and collector vehicles, and uses additive packages fortified with ~1,800 ppm of ZDDP. According to Motul, this oil provides "improved protection for flat tappet or high-lift cams and high-performance engines with tighter tolerances and older elastomer gaskets; the medium detergent level also makes Classic Oil 20W50 an appropriate break-in oil for newly refurbished engines".

Straight-weight Classic Oil SAE 30 and SAE 50 are mineral monograde engine oils with low detergent levels, blended specifically for gasoline or diesel four-stroke engines generally produced before 1950.

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The Ford Explorer Timberline joins the 2021 Explorer King Ranch as a new model for 2021.

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Following in the footsteps of the Raptor and Tremor versions of Ford trucks, the 2021 Ford Explorer Timberline debuts with a host of new equipment designed to make the popular SUV a more capable off-roader. Like what Subaru is doing with its Wilderness packaging, Ford will carry over the Timberland trimmings to multiple models.

"Ford is delivering on more capable SUVs with Timberline. Consumer data has shown us that now more than ever, customers want to get outside and explore nature with friends and family," said Kumar Galhotra, president, Americas & International Markets Group, Ford Motor Company. "Timberline hits a new sweet spot with these customers who want an ideal combination of passenger space, moderate off-road capability and great manners around town."

The Explorer Timberline has a new Forged Green Metallic exterior color. It has a blackout treatment on the headlights and taillamps, as well as the Ford oval. Timberline badges feature on the C-pillars and lift gate. Red Ember tow hoods are at the front and rated at 150 percent gross vehicle weight.

2021 Ford Explorer Timberline

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

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LED fog lamps, a Carbonized Gray grille, and dealer-installed Ford Performance auxiliary lights with a 160,000-candelas output come on the vehicle.

The 2021 Explorer Timberline comes standard with four-wheel drive with torque vectoring technology that works to distribute the right amount of torque to each wheel. It also has a Torsen limited slip rear differential, which helps prevent wheel spin.

Ford's Terrain Management System is also standard, allowing drivers to select between seven drive modes depending on road conditions. The Ford Bronco and Bronco Sport have a similar system. Hill Descent Control is also standard.

Steel skid plates line the front and rear underbody of the vehicle protecting the engine and transmission. Ford has given the model a 0.8-inch ride height increase and heavy-duty shocks that were originally developed for the Explorer Police Interceptor. Steering calibration, stabilizer bars and springs are specially tuned for Timberline – including an exclusive front rebound spring that helps prevent sudden jarring off-road.

The new Explorer has an approach angle of 23.5 degrees and maximum departure angle of 23.7 degrees, plus minimum ground clearance of 8.7 inches.

The rig rides on high-sidewall Bridgestone Dueler P265/65R-18 all-terrain tires with a tread pattern designed to balance off-road traction and on-road quietness. The shoes are wrapped around high-gloss painted aluminum wheels that feature a laser-etched Timberline logo.

Explorer Timberline is powered by a 2.3-liter EcoBoost engine that produces 300 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque. It is paired with a 10-speed automatic transmission.

For customers who need to tow RVs, ATVs and boats to their adventures, the standard Class III Trailer Tow Package brings 5,300 pounds of towing capability.

The interior sports a Deep Cypress color way that is matched with an Ebony headliner, overhead console, pillar trim, grab handles, visors, and moonroof shade. The instrument panel has a Stone Mesh appliqué while other colors feature elsewhere. Satin Silver Twilight is on the center stack, steering wheel bezel and door armrest trim; Deep Cypress on door trim panel inserts; Deep Tangerine stitching on the seats, steering wheel and door trim; and Timberline logos on the front seats.

Rubber floor liners are standard and ActiveX cloth seats inserts are designed to be cleaned easily and keep bottoms in place on rough terrain.

Standard Ford Co-Pilot360 and Co-Pilot360 Assist+ technology features that include Intelligent Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop-and-Go and Speed Sign Recognition, Lane Centering, Evasive Steering Assist and voice-activated touch screen navigation. A 360-degree camera also comes on the model.

Buyers can choose three Outfitters packages – Outfitters SkyBox, Outfitters MegaWarrior and Outfitters FrontLoader. All three packages combine all-weather floor mats, crossbars and the selected Yakima rooftop accessories for customers to take even more equipment with them on their next adventure.

The 2021 Ford Explorer Timberline is available to order now and arrives at Ford dealers this summer joining the Explorer King Ranch and new Platinum grades in the company's lineup.

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