Super Bowl LIV

Go behind the scenes to see how Porsche's Super Bowl LIV commercial was made

A team of 150 people was use to shoot Porsche's Super Bowl commercial.

Photo courtesy of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG

Porsche's Super Bowl commercial was half "The Italian Job", half security guard fantasy. As interesting as it was, the behind the scenes footage and stories are nearly just as much so.

The spot was filmed primarily in and around Porsche's headquarters in Zuffenhausen, Germany at the end of November 2019. Most of the 10 vehicles featured in the commercial are part of the Porsche Museum collection in the town including the new all-electric Porsche Taycan.

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"We have a lot of experience preparing historic vehicles for all kinds of operations but driving a 917 through the centre of Stuttgart, at night, was a first even for us," explains Alexander Klein, Head of Vehicle Management and Heritage Experience at the Porsche Museum. "When we travelled to the location in the Black Forest the roads were covered in snow, and stayed that way until the evening before the shoot. Fortunately, we were prepared and had different tyre profiles and compounds with us, especially for the racing cars. We did not make any technical changes to the museum vehicles though."

Locations for the advertisement are easily identifiable to locals of the Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen area. The opening cuts of the commercial were filmed inside the museum. The cars zoom around the famous Porsche roundabout in Zuffenhausen and the route taken in the spot moves from Stuttgart, Heidelberg, and Heppenheim to the Schwarzenbachtalsperre dam in the northern Black Forest.

The driving was't left to amateurs. One of the drivers, Harald Müller, held the World Record for drifting, while Porsche factory driver Lars Kern was behind the wheel of the iconic 917 K.

Including the drivers, it took a team of 150 people to make the 2:31 extended cut of the commercial come to to life.

Porsche Super Bowl Commercial 2020Porsche filmed most of the scenes for the ad around its Germany headquarters building.Photo courtesy of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG

The director of the product was Wayne McClammy, who, at points during filming, was using up to four cameras at the same time and had a Cayenne fitted with a Russian Arm: a roof-mounted camera crane. Arial shots were completed by two drones, including one that has a top speed of 160 km per hour.

The Super Bowl does't have to be the last time you see the ad. Check out the extended cut here.

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

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Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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The Sport Classic comes to the U.S. for the first time next year.

Porsche

Porsche's bringing the 911 Sport Classic back to market, and it's headed to the United States for the first time. The car features distinctive styling, a rowdy twin-turbo flat-six engine, and plenty of go-fast gear from the 911 Turbo S upon which it is based. The car is scheduled for limited release late in 2022 as a 2023 model year.

2021 Porsche 911 Sport ClassicThe Sport Classic comes exclusively with a manual transmission and RWD.Porsche

The Sport Classic gets the Turbo S powertrain, which means a 3.7-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six engine producing 543 horsepower and 442 pound-feet of torque. It's paired exclusively with a seven-speed manual transmission and rear-wheel drive. Porsche says the combo makes the car the most powerful 911 with a manual gearbox currently on sale. The Sport Classic also gets a laundry list of parts from the Turbo S, including Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes, rear-axle steering, a sport exhaust, and an active sport suspension system.

2021 Porsche 911 Sport ClassicThe car comes with an interior not seen since the Porsche 918 Spyder.Porsche

The car' comes with Sport Grey Metallic paint with grey accent stripes, a carbon fiber reinforced plastic hood, and unique graphics on both sides. It rides on 20-inch wheels up front and 21-inch wheels in back, which are designed as reinterpretations of the old-school Fuchs design. In back, the Sport Classic gets unique bodywork that sets it apart from the 911 Turbo, such as deleted air intakes and a large ducktail spoiler. Inside, the 911 gets open-pore wood trim and semi-aniline leather upholstery in cognac and black. Porsche says the Sport Classic is the first car to get that type of leather since the iconic 918 Spyder.

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