Timepiece

Porsche Design adding custom chronographs to their lineup

Porsche's new custom chronograph takes its design cues from the 911.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Personalization continues to grow in popularity, not just as an offering by automakers for the vehicles, but for the lifestyle arms of their business. Porsche is no exception. Beginning July 1, Porsche Design will offer customers in Germany the opportunity to design a custom chronograph. In September, the offering will begin expanding to Great Britain and the U.S.

"There is great global demand for custom personalisation from the factory. Around 90 percent of all 911 models are personalised for customers using equipment from Exclusive Manufaktur. Twenty-five percent of all vehicles delivered around the world from this product line pass through the Exclusive Manufaktur workshop, in which special customer wishes are also brought to life," says Alexander Fabig, Head of Personalization and Classic.

Porsche Design custom chronograph

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

"The cooperation with Porsche Design has been successful over the course of many years. From the 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series through to the current 911 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition, seven limited-edition Porsche Design timepieces matching the individual vehicles have already been offered."

"With the innovative 'Porsche Design custom-built timepieces' concept, we are now offering customers the possibility of designing a timepiece to match their individual Porsche," adds Jan Becker, CEO Porsche Design Group. "No other timepiece brand or automotive manufacturer currently offers such a personalized and exclusive timepiece concept."

Each custom timepiece is manufacturer in the company's own workshop in Switzerland. Numerous visual and technical personalization elements are offered including the opportunity to choose the color of the case and dial; material of the wrist strap; and the design and color of the automatic movement rotor.

Porsche Design custom chronograph There are 1.5 million customization options available.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

The case of each chronograph is titanium. Customers can choose between a glass bead-blasted or PVD titanium carbide-coated black case. The dial falls into line with the design of the 911, and is reminiscent of the cars' instrument cluster and rev counter. The wrist strap options include the choice of a titanium strap with black or titanium-coloured surface and a leather strap, whose material and color options are based on the interior and exterior of the 911. The leather strap can be finished with contrast stitching using genuine Porsche vehicle thread.

There are 1.5 million possible combinations.

The timepiece features the Porsche Design WERK 01.100, a chronograph movement with chronometer certification that was developed in-house. The timepiece winds itself automatically while worn.

A message, name, or the chassis number of the owner's vehicle can be engraved on the bottom of the timepiece

Porsche Design custom chronograph The leather is stitched using the same Porsche thread that is inside the 911.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Customers can build their model using the web-based Porsche Design Timepieces Configurator or design and order their chronograph as part of the vehicle consulting process in participating Porsche Centres (or with the experts at Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur in Zuffenhausen).

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What was your best car-related experience this year?

Chris Teague

This year has been a lot of things, but it hasn't been boring. Even if we focus only on the car world, there's plenty to talk about, from microchip-related new vehicle shortages to the wave of new electric vehicles hitting the market. That leaves us with a question for all of you: What was the best or most memorable car moment for you in 2021? I'll get the conversation started.

Porsche Cayenne GTS My SoCal Cayenne śaw snow for the first time in its nearly 200k-mile life last week.Chris Teague

I'd spent a good portion of 2021 wanting a new-old car to drive when I wasn't testing a new vehicle. That's harder than you'd think for someone who thinks, talks, and writes about cars all day, because there are so many interesting, risky, and downright funky options out there in every price range. The added headache for me was that I'd chosen to shop for a "fun" car in one of the most volatile car markets ever seen. Even the extremely high-mileage "untouchable" European cars I wanted to buy were commanding ridiculous prices.

After a solid few months of waffling between various rattletrap Mercedes-AMG, BMW M, and Audi S/RS cars, I landed on an option that had escaped me before: The Porsche Cayenne. First-generation Cayennes are a real bargain now, but the 955/957 (Porsche's internal code for the SUVs) can experience major problems that occur with or without regular maintenance and care. I was determined to buy one, and wasn't overly concerned about mileage, as long as I could count the number of owners on one hand. There was a beautiful 2009 Cayenne GTS with 90,000 miles but nine owners, a gorgeous 2004 Cayenne Turbo with a concerning engine tick, and many more just like them. Finally, I decided to risky-click a 196,000-mile Cayenne GTS in Southern California. It had one owner and one dealer-owner for a month or two prior to sale, its condition looked decent in photos, and I was able to negotiate a reasonable enough price that shipping it from San Diego to Maine wasn't a huge problem.

Porsche Cayenne GTS The pics look great, but hands-on tells another story.Chris Teague

I had two traveling Euro mechanics check the car out, and both confirmed that it was well-worn but mechanically sound, so I jumped. Ten days later, on a snowy, icy, dark Maine afternoon, the Cayenne arrived. Cosmetically, there were a few things the dealer and mechanics failed to mention, but overall, it looked good. The SUV passed Maine safety and emissions testing without problem, got a new set of Michelins, and I was on my way.

Porsche Cayenne GTS I'm in danger, but thankfully this should be a reasonable fix.Chris Teague

A few days of driving revealed what I was really in for. A check engine light revealed a camshaft position sensor error and the Cayenne displayed a nasty vibration at idle. A new sensor and motor mounts, and I'm on my way. I'll update you as more things break or miraculously work, but I want to hear your memories from 2021.

Email me at chris@automotivemap.com, and I will compile the best and most interesting stories for a story on New Year's Day. May you all have a wonderful 2022.

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Insurance company Hagerty compiled a list of cars it thinks will climb in value and price.

Hagerty

Vehicle prices have grown across the board this year, but collector car prices have been on the move for years. The world of online car auctions and car shows such as Radwood have driven attention to obscure and otherwise unknown cars, pushing their prices. Insurance and overall automotive lifestyle company Hagerty is stepping in to help. It complied a list of vehicles that it believes are currently a good value and have potential to climb. The Hagerty Bull Market List covers ten vehicles of all types.

Hagerty’s list is expansive, covering several vehicle types, prices, and time periods. The list features vehicles built between 1963 and 2012, and is designed to nudge people into buying cars before they become unattainable. This is especially important now, as online auction sites have moved the markets for some previously obscure cars well past the point of reason.

The Bull Market List isn’t intended to give you an inside track on car values so that you can flip them for quick profit. Instead, the list should give you the push you need if you’re already on the fence about buying a car to keep and drive a cool vehicle. Hagerty wants people to buy the cars and have the ability to pass them on to other enthusiasts without charging exorbitant prices.

The Bull Market List includes (with excellent condition pricing):

  • 1965-1970 Cadillac DeVille ($28,800)
  • 1969-1974 Ferrari 246 Dino ($365,800)
  • 1983-1997 Land Rover Defender ($61,400)
  • 1979-1985 Mazda RX-7 ($17,600)
  • 1962-1967 Mercedes-Benz 230SL ($80,500)
  • 1963-1967 Pontiac GTO ($100,200)
  • 1992-1995 Porsche 968 ($38,000)
  • 1985-1995 Suzuki Samurai ($10,200)
  • 2008-2012 Tesla Roadster Sport ($97,000)
  • 1975-1993 Volvo 245 ($15,800)

If you’re considering one of the vehicles on the list and have the means, it’s a good idea to act in the near future. Vehicle prices are rising due to supply chain shortages to the point that even older cars are climbing. That, plus the effects of online car auctions, have made it hard to find a good value car.

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