Tribute

Two special editions pay tribute to the first Porsche 911 to arrive in Australia

Australia's first 911 has been reimagined by Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur with two new tribute models.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

The first Porsche 911 was brought to the continent in 1964 by Australian Porsche distributor at the time, Norman Hamilton. It was sold to farmer Ron Angas. That 911 is the inspiration for a pair of matching Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur 911 Carrera S models that were created jointly by Porsche Centre Melbourne and Porsche Centre Sydney South.

"The idea was to take the 1965 911 and reimagine that car and all its wonderful details for 2020," explains Dean Williams, New Vehicle Sales Manager, Porsche Centre Melbourne.

2002 Porsche 911 Australia The two models are inspired by the first 911 to make its way to the continent in the 1960s.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Porsche tells the story of the initial car's deliver:

"When Ron Angas put down 2,000 Australian pounds on a new six cylinder Porsche in 1964, the order form stated '901'. But by the time the sports car arrived on Angas's farm in the Barossa Valley, 100 km north of Adelaide, the badge bore the numbers 911, following Porsche's now-famous trademark dispute with Peugeot. The new owner didn't mind: it meant the distinctive '119' black and white number plate that had been worn by several Angas family cars over the years would neatly mirror the new addition's model name."

That 911 was loved and exercised often by its owner. It was routinely seen partaking in the Collingrove hillclimb that Angas had built on his property. After racking up 87,000 km on the odometer, Angas sold the 911 to his architect friend Roy Wilson in February 1969.

Stewart Kay, the car's current owner, first saw the classic when he interviewed Wilson for a university paper in the late 1980s. Porsche describes the moment he first laid eyes on it:

"Secreted in the shadows of Wilson's garage, Kay noticed it bore a stark similarity to a car he had read about in an English magazine. On display at the Porsche Museum, he recalled that the car had been cited as the 'oldest known 911'.

"When he checked the article later, he was surprised to discover that the Museum car's chassis number was 302 503: exactly 1,000 cars later than the one he had just seen. Calls to the factory via Porsche Cars Australia soon confirmed that the 911 in Wilson's garage was one of the first right hand drive examples ever built.

He pleaded with Wilson – initially without success – to buy the car, but it wasn't until 1992 that he received a phone call asking: "Do you still want it?". A price was negotiated immediately and the car – complete with original keys, original owners' manual, service books and more than 136,000 km on the clock – found itself its third delighted owner."

The two tribute models do not share the same mechanical components, instead relying on the aesthetic customization options of Porsche Exclusive Manufakturt to create the special edition models.

The 1965 911 was finished in Stone Grey but that color is no longer part of the Porsche lineup. Its modern equivalent is Crayon. In addition to that paint job, the two models feature offset 20- and 21-inch wheels in Carrera Exclusive Design with black calipers. Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur SportDesign side skirts, painted exterior mirrors and high-gloss trim strips finish the look.

Porsche 911 from 1965 reimagined in Sydney

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Challenging designers, the early model 911 was swathed in green leather, which contrasts with the car's maple yellow timber dashboard, which was a standard feature when the car was new. There was a matching wood-rimmed steering wheel and 'English' instrumentation.

The new versions of the 911 are finished with Agave Green Club leather with contrasting Crayon stitching and matching Agave Green seat belts. The inspiration car did not have the 14-way power-adjustable sport seats with memory that have made their way into the new models, complete with the Porsche crest embossed into the headrests.

Brushed aluminium door sill guards in dark silver are illuminated and personalised with '1965 Reimagined' text. Both of the type 992 cars have been fitted with an interior package in a Paldao Dark design.

Kay's 911 is usually housed at the museum at The Bend Motorsport Park in Tailem Bend, South Australia. Tt will go on show alongside its new descendants at Porsche Australia's two Exclusive Manufaktur partners: Porsche Centre Sydney South and Porsche Centre Melbourne.

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What was your best car-related experience this year?

Chris Teague

This year has been a lot of things, but it hasn't been boring. Even if we focus only on the car world, there's plenty to talk about, from microchip-related new vehicle shortages to the wave of new electric vehicles hitting the market. That leaves us with a question for all of you: What was the best or most memorable car moment for you in 2021? I'll get the conversation started.

Porsche Cayenne GTS My SoCal Cayenne śaw snow for the first time in its nearly 200k-mile life last week.Chris Teague

I'd spent a good portion of 2021 wanting a new-old car to drive when I wasn't testing a new vehicle. That's harder than you'd think for someone who thinks, talks, and writes about cars all day, because there are so many interesting, risky, and downright funky options out there in every price range. The added headache for me was that I'd chosen to shop for a "fun" car in one of the most volatile car markets ever seen. Even the extremely high-mileage "untouchable" European cars I wanted to buy were commanding ridiculous prices.

After a solid few months of waffling between various rattletrap Mercedes-AMG, BMW M, and Audi S/RS cars, I landed on an option that had escaped me before: The Porsche Cayenne. First-generation Cayennes are a real bargain now, but the 955/957 (Porsche's internal code for the SUVs) can experience major problems that occur with or without regular maintenance and care. I was determined to buy one, and wasn't overly concerned about mileage, as long as I could count the number of owners on one hand. There was a beautiful 2009 Cayenne GTS with 90,000 miles but nine owners, a gorgeous 2004 Cayenne Turbo with a concerning engine tick, and many more just like them. Finally, I decided to risky-click a 196,000-mile Cayenne GTS in Southern California. It had one owner and one dealer-owner for a month or two prior to sale, its condition looked decent in photos, and I was able to negotiate a reasonable enough price that shipping it from San Diego to Maine wasn't a huge problem.

Porsche Cayenne GTS The pics look great, but hands-on tells another story.Chris Teague

I had two traveling Euro mechanics check the car out, and both confirmed that it was well-worn but mechanically sound, so I jumped. Ten days later, on a snowy, icy, dark Maine afternoon, the Cayenne arrived. Cosmetically, there were a few things the dealer and mechanics failed to mention, but overall, it looked good. The SUV passed Maine safety and emissions testing without problem, got a new set of Michelins, and I was on my way.

Porsche Cayenne GTS I'm in danger, but thankfully this should be a reasonable fix.Chris Teague

A few days of driving revealed what I was really in for. A check engine light revealed a camshaft position sensor error and the Cayenne displayed a nasty vibration at idle. A new sensor and motor mounts, and I'm on my way. I'll update you as more things break or miraculously work, but I want to hear your memories from 2021.

Email me at chris@automotivemap.com, and I will compile the best and most interesting stories for a story on New Year's Day. May you all have a wonderful 2022.

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Insurance company Hagerty compiled a list of cars it thinks will climb in value and price.

Hagerty

Vehicle prices have grown across the board this year, but collector car prices have been on the move for years. The world of online car auctions and car shows such as Radwood have driven attention to obscure and otherwise unknown cars, pushing their prices. Insurance and overall automotive lifestyle company Hagerty is stepping in to help. It complied a list of vehicles that it believes are currently a good value and have potential to climb. The Hagerty Bull Market List covers ten vehicles of all types.

Hagerty’s list is expansive, covering several vehicle types, prices, and time periods. The list features vehicles built between 1963 and 2012, and is designed to nudge people into buying cars before they become unattainable. This is especially important now, as online auction sites have moved the markets for some previously obscure cars well past the point of reason.

The Bull Market List isn’t intended to give you an inside track on car values so that you can flip them for quick profit. Instead, the list should give you the push you need if you’re already on the fence about buying a car to keep and drive a cool vehicle. Hagerty wants people to buy the cars and have the ability to pass them on to other enthusiasts without charging exorbitant prices.

The Bull Market List includes (with excellent condition pricing):

  • 1965-1970 Cadillac DeVille ($28,800)
  • 1969-1974 Ferrari 246 Dino ($365,800)
  • 1983-1997 Land Rover Defender ($61,400)
  • 1979-1985 Mazda RX-7 ($17,600)
  • 1962-1967 Mercedes-Benz 230SL ($80,500)
  • 1963-1967 Pontiac GTO ($100,200)
  • 1992-1995 Porsche 968 ($38,000)
  • 1985-1995 Suzuki Samurai ($10,200)
  • 2008-2012 Tesla Roadster Sport ($97,000)
  • 1975-1993 Volvo 245 ($15,800)

If you’re considering one of the vehicles on the list and have the means, it’s a good idea to act in the near future. Vehicle prices are rising due to supply chain shortages to the point that even older cars are climbing. That, plus the effects of online car auctions, have made it hard to find a good value car.

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