Fashion

All aboard the Wool Express! Polestar, John Sterner collaborate for safe delivery

The Stutterheim store in Öland is near where the company hosts its sheep.

Photo courtesy of Polestar

You may have heard of slow food. The movement focuses on the preservation of local and traditional dishes. Slow fashion is designed in a similar vein. It focuses on an entire supply chain and manufacturing base being in one region. John Sterner, a slow fashion knitwear brand from Alexander Stutterheim, founder of Stutterheim, does just that.

The company's hub is the wind battered island of Öland, off the Swedish coast. The second-largest Swedish island has 26,000 inhabitants and is home to the annual King's Rally vintage motorcade. On a single patch of land on the island, Stutterheim keeps a flock of sheep. Their wool is turned into warm and cozy knitwear, which make excellent gifts.

Stutterheim Polestar 2Stutterheim and John Sterner share common ownership.Photo courtesy of Polestar

However, with strict COVID-19-related regulations in place, it's become a chore for shoppers to get to the company's "Flagsheep store", which is located right next to the field. Even though they were able to order online, the personal touch that slow fashion so often affords was lost.

Stutterheim wanted to personally deliver gifts to the buyers and partnered with Polestar to perform the task. Enter: the Wool Express. The Wool Express wasn't a train, rather a Polestar 2 charged with green energy and loaded with gobs of woolen scarves and jumpers. It left Öland last week, headed to Stockholm, a journey of about 430 kilometers.

The approach of slow fashion appeals to Stutterheim because of its sustainability. "We're trying to be an open, holistic brand," he says of his eco-luxury knitwear line, "one that challenges the mass production industry's values."

Polestar is also game for sustainability, applying it to automotive design and execution. "At Polestar, we challenge the old notions of what premium means in the car industry. In Polestar 2 you'll find vegan WeaveTech upholstery and reconstructed wood instead of leather and chrome, but we also hold our entire supply chain to high standards to address sustainability in all directions," said Maximilian Missoni, Head of Design at Polestar.

See more about the journey here:

The Wool Express with Alexander Stutterheimwww.youtube.com

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

Front crash preventionwww.youtube.com

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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The new Type R set a Suzuka Circuit lap record.

Honda

The new Honda Civic somehow improves on the formula laid out by its numerous predecessors and does so with style, refinement, and value. The Civic Si built on that foundation with a potent turbocharged engine and solid handling, but Honda's not done with the Civic. The automaker just teased the new Civic Type R, and it set records at Japan's Suzuka Circuit during a recent testing session.

The All-New 2023 Type R Achieves Track Record at Suzukawww.youtube.com

The Type R lapped Suzuka Circuit in 2 minutes, 23.120 seconds, a record-breaking lap for a front-wheel drive car. The video features neat telemetry information on-screen during the lap as well, but the real excitement comes later when full specs are revealed.

Honda's been understandably mum on details on the new Type R's powertrain and performance numbers, but the car is expected to carry the same powertrain with its predecessor. The 300-horsepower turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine made that car a force to be reckoned with, so the 2023 Civic Type R will likely continue carrying that torch.

Honda Civic Type RHonda will fully reveal the car this summer. Honda

Honda will reveal the car in all its glory this summer. As for pricing, the previous car started around $38,000, so the new model should be around there to start. That, of course, is before dealers mark it up and other lucky buyers snap them up for insane resale on an auction site.

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