Vintage & Classics

October hot rod races to once again pit vintage cars against sandy South Wales

This 1929 Ford Model A is driven by Matt Ferrant on the beach ahead of the annual London Concours and Pendine Sands Hot Rod Races.

Photo by James Mitchell

With track racing all by halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Pendine Sands Hot Rod Races October 3-4 dates on the calendar are something unique to look forward to.

The event sits squarely at the intersection of vintage vehicles and speed. On Pendine Sands, it's about hitting top speed rather than a short sprint.

At the event over 150 pre-1949 modified American cars meet on the beach to compete for class records and entry to the 100 mph club. One participant will be crowned "King of the Beach".

Malcolm Campbell Pendine Sands Crowds surrounding Sir Malcolm Campbell (1885 - 1948) on July 21, 1925 in his Sunbeam after he had broken the world record for the mile and kilometer at a speed of 150.368 mph on Pendine Sands, Carmarthenshire. Photo by Getty Images

TheSands have a rich history when it comes to auto racing. The seven miles of shoreline that meets Carmarthen Bay in Southern Wales served as the host of the annual Welsh TT motorcycle event starting in 1922. Its firm, flat surface was considered straighter and smoother than most any major road at the time, making it an ideal setting for car racing.

Malcom Campbell, a British speed racing enthusiast, set the world land speed record of 146.16 mpg on the beach in his Sunbeam 350HP car nicknamed Blue Bird in 1924. That car now sits in the National Motor Museum in Beaulieu, Hampshire, England. Campbell would go on to set nine records through 1934 culminating in a run at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah, which saw him become the first person to surpass 300 mph in a car.

The Vintage Hot Rod Association (VHRA) brought speed back to the sands starting in 2013 with their annual Hot Rod Races. Ahead of the races, several of the models will be shown off at the London Concours, slated for August 19-20, 2020.

According to a release, Matt Farrant, the three-time King of the Beach will be bringing his 1929 Ford Model A Roadster pick-up to display. The car is an early 1960s style street roadster. His goal is to run a 12-second quarter mile on a dragstrip. He's already clocked 119 mph on the sand. Despite being race-ready, the car serves valiantly during the year as a daily driver, often taking Farrant and his family on road trips.

Rebecca Dunn 1930 Ford Model A Rebecca Dunn has piloted this 1930 Ford Model A on the sand.Photo by James Mitchell

Rebecca Dunn, will bring her 1930 Ford Model A Coupe to the London Concours. The Model A is a mishmash of brands underneath. It has a Desoto Hemi 330 cu-in engine at its heart with Lincoln brakes, Buick finned drums, and other parts from Ford and Plymouth. According to a release, "On the sand, there are only two women who have managed to break the 100 mph barrier in their own cars and Rebecca is one of them."

Chris Rawlins has a 1932 Ford Streamliner that takes its styling cues from 1940s-era California dry lakes modified hot rods. It gets its power from a Ford Flathead V8 and has a Ford gearbox and rear axle. It features a modified canopy from a WW2 T6 Texan aircraft. For a number of years, Rawlins has pushed the limits of his hot rod, entering the 100 mph club and securing a number of class wins.

Tickets for the London Concours are now available and start at £40. The Pendine Sands Hot Rod Races are free to spectators.

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The Ducati Diavel 1260 Lamborghini is inspired by a pioneering Lamborghini car.

Photo courtesy of Ducati

Automobili Lamborghini and Ducati have partnered to design a limited edition motorcycle. The Ducati Diavel 1260 Lamborghini is said to embody "Italian excellence" and is comprised of the values of sport companies: "sportiness, attention to design, and a meticulous devotion to detail". Just 630 of the models will be made.

Inspiration for the project comes from the Lamborghini Sián FKP 37, a car noted as being the first to combine a V12 engine and hybrid technology based on supercapacitors. With their powers combined, the Lamborghini reaches speeds over 220 mph. Its body is totally made of carbon fiber with sharp lines optimized for aerodynamic excellence. The automaker's signature Y-shaped features and hexagonal shapes are on display on the interior and exterior of the car.

Photo courtesy of Ducati

The new bike is based on the Ducati Diavel 1260 S, which the company describes as powerful, muscular, agile, and "effective between the curves". Traditionally, the 1260 S comes in a red and white paint job with Ducati graphics. The motorcycle is powered by Ducati's Testastretta DVT 1262 engine, which achieves 162 horsepower and offers three ride modes and three power modes. Its lightweight frame is paired with adjustable forks, Öhlins suspensions, Marchesini forged rims, and a daytime running light.

Centro Stile Ducati redesigned the bike for the project. For the Diavel 1260 Lamborghini, Ducati has improved upon the 1260 S replacing its rims with forged ones designed explicitly to recall the car, finished in Oro Electrum paint. The same theory holds for the new carbon fiber radiator covers and Ducati red Brembo brake calipers. Additionally, the silencer cover, spoiler, central tank cover, seat cover, front and rear mudguards, dashboard cover and headlight frame are also made of carbon.

The livery of the Diavel 1260 Lamborghini is the result of the collaboration between the Centro Stile Ducati and Centro Stile Lamborghini. The bike's Verde Gea paint is the same as what was applied to the Sián FKP 37. The livery of this Diavel has a '63': an important number for the Sant'Agata Bolognese company that was founded in 1963. Multiply 63 by 10 and you get the number of units of the model to be produce by Ducati.

The Ducati Siavel 1260 S starts at $22,995. Expect this limited edition model to be a premium on that price.

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The expected range of the Volkswagen ID.4 has been confirmed.

Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

The 2021 Volkswagen ID.4 will have an EPA-estimated 250-mile range. The estimate is for ID.4 1st Edition and Pro models. The EPA-estimated fuel economy for city driving is 104 MPGe; highway driving is rated at 89 MPGe, and combined city/highway at 97 MPGe. It will be VW's first long-range model sold in the U.S.

The ID.4 1st Edition and Pro will be the first models out of the gate for VW. They feature an 82 kilowatt-hour battery and a rear-mounted motor that produces 201 horsepower and 228 pound-feet of torque.

2021 Volkswagen ID.4 The interior of the ID.4 features a minimalist aesthetic.Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

Volkswagen says that at a DC fast-charging station, with 125 kilowatt charging, the ID.4 can go from five to 80 percent charged in about 38 minutes. VW is providing three years of Electrify America fast charging with every ID.4 purchase at no additional cost. Electrify America is the nation's largest open DC fast charging network with more than 470 charging stations and over 2,000 DC fast chargers. Earlier this year the company completed its second cross-country charging route.

Based on calculations by Volskwagen using the EPA's cost allowances, it will cost $700 per year, on average, to fuel the ID.4 in the U.S. The company estimates that over five years owners will save $2,250 compared to the average new model.

The first ID.4s will be made overseas soon. VW will make the battery electric vehicle (BEV) in the U.S.A at VW's Chattanooga plant. The model will be made and go on sale in early 2021.

Pricing for the ID.4 starts at $39,995 for the ID.4 Pro. Buyers may qualify for a $7,500 federal tax credit. The limited-run ID.4 1st Edition, which sold out the day the vehicle was launched, carried an MSRP of $43,995.

Volkswagen has plans to release a 302-horsepower, electric all-wheel-drive variant of the ID.4 later in 2021. Range estimates for that model are forthcoming.

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