Etiquette

New Nissan EV Driver Etiquette guide establishes best practices for EV drivers

A new guide from Nissan shares the best practices for EV drivers.

Photo courtesy of Nissan Europe

Are you a good EV driver? That's not solely measured by the percentage time you maintain your lane. It's now also to be judged by whether or not you're following the "Nissan EV Driver Etiquette" guide.

Billed as a "one-stop manual" for EV drivers, the pocket guide gives helpful tips and "features guidance on how to support fellow EV drivers and simple ways to boost confidence on the road," according to a release.

There's some good tips, like remembering not to ICE your fellow drivers and reminding folks that it's impolite to unnplug the power plug from a user's vehicle without their consent.

Without any further ado, here is the full list of tips straight from Nissan:

Sharing is caring.

Lend a helping hand by sharing your own tips on local public charging points with friends and family, or use apps and forums to pool your advice with tips from fellow EV drivers in the local area. With the Nissan Charge app, you can help everyone in the EV community by advising which points are the best, helping them to plan any necessary long journeys with ease.

Consider your fellow EV enthusiasts.

Avoid unplugging other drivers' EVs at public charging points and if you have a charging point at home, consider offering it to your neighbour in a way that is safe and compliant. 88% of people prioritise charging at home, so sharing your charging spot if needed could go a long way and might make someone's day.

Avoid ICEing and a frosty reception.

Photo courtesy of Nissan Europe

Just as you would avoid parking at an unused fuel pump, save everyone the hassle by not parking in an EV charging spot if you don't intend to use the charger.

Just as disabled drivers need the use of designated spaces, EV drivers need their own spots to charge. If you do need to charge your electric car, be considerate and think how long you need to charge it for; at a public CHAdeMO rapid charging point, you can charge the 40kWh Nissan LEAF and 62kWh LEAF e+ from 20% to 80% in just 60 minutes and 90 minutes, respectively.

Take good care of your battery.

Avoid leaving your EV at low battery level for a long time to ensure battery capacity and minimize the impact on driving range. If possible, park in a closed tempered place.

Plan your recharge.

Photo courtesy of Nissan Europe

If you're planning a longer journey, plot out your route first and make use of mapping services to see available charging points along the way.

Planning ahead always pays off; it goes a long way to making a lengthy trip even easier. There are some really useful tools to help you do this; the Nissan Charge app provides the price and availability of charging points in real time, allowing you to be flexible. On average, it is €2 per 100 km to charge a LEAF, so you can make the most of public charging points on the move.

Don't need much power? Leave a friendly note.

If you don't need to charge for very long at a public charging point, why not leave a nice note on the windshield or the charger for the next EV drivers to let them know how long it will take you, or at what time you are coming back.

Check your tyres and driving settings

To maximise power efficiency, switch on your car's energy-saving modes and ensure your tyres are inflated to the manufacturer-recommended level.

You can boost the efficiency of your electric car with a couple of quick steps. Choosing the appropriate drive mode is key. With the Nissan LEAF, you can choose Eco-Mode to optimise your journey, recommended for city driving. Also, Nissan's unique e-Pedal technology to accelerate and decelerate your LEAF using one pedal optimises regenerative braking and lets the car do the work. Activating the LEAF's B mode further enhances regenerative braking, providing even more energy on the move.

Explore the range of available charging options.

An electric car is like a sleeping cat; it's inactive for around 20 hours every day, so make the most of this time. Whether it's rapid public charging point, an installed wall unit at home, or a standard domestic plug, you can effortlessly charge your electric car wherever you can access mains power – just like your smartphone.

Look after your local charging points.

Photo courtesy of Nissan Europe

Just as you would look after your charging solutions at home, take care of your local public charging infrastructure so that everyone can benefit.

The full Nissan LEAF Driver Etiquette can be viewed and downloaded here.

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The 2021 Nissan Rogue is designed with families in mind.

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

The Nissan Rogue has been redesigned for the 2021 model year. It continues to bring a lot of what families like to the table. As one of America's top-selling SUVs, the Rogue competes directly with the Toyota RAV4, Honda CR-V, Mazda CX-5, and Ford Escape, among others. Check out the Nissan's most compelling features by scrolling down.

Every Rogue comes loaded with safety technology.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

The Nissan Safety Shield 360 suite of safety and driver assist technology comes standard on the Rogue. It includes automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blind spot warning, rear cross-traffic alert, land departure warning, high beam assist, and rear automatic braking.

Additionally, the company's Intelligent Driver Alertness and Rear Door Alert technologies are standard.

The rear doors open wide.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Nissan's engineering team has enabled the rear doors on the 2021 Rogue to open to nearly 90 degrees. That not only makes it easy to get luggage and groceries in and out, but also kids and car seats. All three rear seating positions allow for child seat installation.

Keyless entry has been expanded to the rear doors.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

No need to pull out the key to open the doors of the Rogue. Traditionally the keyless entry function works for the driver's door (and sometimes the front passenger's door) and then the driver must open the door and press the unlock button to unlock the rear doors.

Now, the Nissan Intelligent Key will allow rear doors to unlock by holding the key near the door and pressing the button on the rear door handle. All doors can be unlocked by pressing the button twice in quick succession.

Remote technology keeps you and your family warm or cool, right away.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Avaialbe Remote Engine Start technology with Intelligent Climate Control allows parents to heat or cool the cabin of the Rogue from a remote location prior to entering the vehicle. This allows young children and others relief from enduring climate extremes.

Zero Gravity fills the Rogue's universe.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Nissan's ultra-comfortable NASA-inspired Zero Gravity seats are no longer for front-row passengers. For 2021, the Rogue gets the seats in the second row - standard. The seats feature low-fatigue spinal support and are available with heated seat functionality.

Privacy and comfort, please.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

You, your passenger, and your kids can enjoy the three zones of climate control in the 2021 Rogue. The front passenger and driver each have a zone while the third is for rear-seat occupants.

Class-exclusive pull-up sunshades help keep the sun out, aiding in climate control system functionality.

Cargo storage has gotten easier.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Nissan's team has redesigned the Divide-n-Hide cargo storage system for the 2021 model year, allowing it to provide hidden storage. On the inner right side of the cargo area (behind the wheel arch), there is a space for securing wider items like a. bag of groceries or a gallon of milk.

A motion-activated tailgate is newly available for 2021.

Cords are so last year.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Now owners can connect without cords. The 2021 Rogue comes with available wireless Apple CarPlay as well as a wireless smartphone charger.

If you're an Android user, then you'll have to use a cord to connect. For those users, there are USB Type-C and Type-A charging ports.

ProPilot Assist takes the wheel.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Nissan's ProPilot Assist technology doesn't allow for hands-free driving and it's not self-driving, but it does fuse together many functionalities that make daily drive functions easier, especially when your children are doing their best to distract you.

ProPILOT Assist combines steering assist and Intelligent Cruise Control to help control acceleration. It can be used in heavy traffic and on open highways.

For 2021, ProPilot Assist has been enhanced. It has next-generation radar and camera technology that is designed to allow for smoother braking, better steering assist, and improved detection performance when vehicles cut into the lane.

Rogue's drive modes are designed to inspire confidence.

2021 Nissan Rogue

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Nissan has made the Rogue available with all-wheel drive. Those models also get five drive modes: Off-road, Snow, Standard, Eco, and Sport. The modes are engaged using the drive-mode selector mounted on the center console. The all-wheel drive system uses new technology that is designed to respond quicker when slippage is detected.

Production of the 2021 Nissan Rogue is underway now in Smyrna, Tennessee. It will arrive at dealerships later this fall.

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The first all-electric Karma Automotive model is set to debut next year.

Photo courtesy of Karma Automotive

Karma Automotive is promising to debut its first all-electric car in 2021. To understand how we got here, it's important to look back a decade.

Fisker Automotive was founded by heralded car designer Henrik Fisker in 2007. For a brief moment in history, it produced the Fisker Karma, one of the world's first production luxury plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The first Karma was delivered in 2011 but by 2014, the company was staring down liquidation.

That year, Fisker Automotive's Karma vehicle design, tooling, and manufacturing facility were purchased by Wanxiang Group, the largest China-based automotive components company by revenue. Henrik Fisker retried the Fisker trademarks and rights to the Fisker brand. He went on to launch Fisker Inc., a separate company that has big plans for all-electric vehicles, in 2016. Wanxiang Group renamed its vehicle company Karma Automotive.

And now here we are.

Karma Automotive has released an image of the GS as a teaser.

Karma Automotive says that the 2021 debut will be the first public step in a full line, which includes electrification options and leans on technological advancements to set itself apart. The GS Series model will be Karma's first-ever battery electric luxury sedan.

The new models will retain much of the same design as the Revero.

"We are pleased to announce that Karma will now offer our first all-electric vehicle next year as part of the GS series," said Dr. Lance Zhou, Karma's CEO. "Cost reductions in the BOM, streamlining our supply chain and standardized production methods also allowed for a new, more attainable pricing structure for the GS lineup allowing for higher market penetration, opening up the market to a larger group of entry level luxury buyers."

Though its looks, range, pricing, and options aren't yet public knowledge, customers can currently reserve their model at http://www.karmaautomotive.com/reserve. All reservations require a fully-refundable $100 deposit.

For years Chinese brands have been looking to break into the U.S. market without much success. Though there are a growing number of Karma dealerships in the U.S., sales of the vehicles are few and far between.

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