Guides

Everything you need to know about Nissan Concierge

Nissan is selling the 2020 Titan with available Nissan Concierge service.

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

Nissan Concierge is just like having your own personal assistant along for the ride. Certain Nissan cars, trucks, and SUVs are available with the service (more are on the way), which is accessed using the car's infotainment touch screen.

Scroll down to learn more about the service.

What is Nissan Concierge?

Think of NissanConnect as a better connection between you, your car, and your lifestyle. Nissan Concierge takes that a step further acting as a personal assistant.

How are NissanConnect and Nissan Concierge different?

NissanConnect Concierge

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

NissanConnect can assist with remote starting your car, unlocking your doors, or checking to see how much fuel is left in the tank, among other services. Nissan Concierge goes further, giving you access to a truly

Nissan Concierge offers a variety of services.

Need someone to place a pizza, coffee, or burrito order? Looking for showtimes for a movie? Wondering what traffic is like on the highway? Need to plan a road trip route? Have a three-year old that keeps asking questions about life and you're sick of answering them? Nissan Concierge is there to help.

They can also do things you might not otherwise think of, like help with homework and suggest a good place to stop and use the restroom, and pay your bills.

Nissan has information on their website about the security features that are in place to keep your information secure.

You'll need to give them access.

If you want to spend money through your Nissan Concierge representative, you'll need to have them keep a credit card number on file. They'll use this to charge for purchases.

This also means that they'll need access to your accounts. If you want to order that Papa Johns pizza, they'll need your username and password.

There are limits to the system.

When you can't get a signal via your cell phone, your vehicle might also not be able to get a signal. Inclement weather, road hazards, and topography all play a role.

You won't always have to talk to someone.

NissanConnect Concierge

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

There are multiple ways to take advantage of Nissan Concierge services that don't require talking on the phone. Texting, emailing, and using Amazon Alexa are just some of the ways. Scroll down to see more.

When you do need to talk to someone, there's a human ready to help.

Nissan Concierge isn't just a tech-heavy answering service. You'll connect with people that are there to help.

Some features rely on your car's telematics device to be in proper working order.

This means that your vehicle must be able to connect to a wireless network that is available, provide navigation map data, and have GPS satellite signal reception.

Some features rely on third-party vendors.

Nissan works with third-parties to deliver its NissanConnect Services. Some service providers may restrict or terminate parts of the service or activate additional parts of the service.

You might not be able to use all the features while driving.

Driving is inherently dangerous. With safety in mind, Nissan has restricted some services while the vehicle is in motion.

Here's the ways to access Nissan Concierge inside or outside your vehicle.

NissanConnect Concierge

Photo courtesy of Nissan North America

  • Press the headset icon on the vehicle's display and say "Concierge".
  • Access the NissanConnect Services app on your smartphone
  • Use the NissanConnect Services Skill with Amazon Alexa or Action for the Google Assistant
  • Send a SMS Text: 88635
  • Call on your phone: (888) 717-1411
  • Email: requests@nissanconcierge.com

You'll need to verify your identity.

Nissan Concierge requires enrollment in NissanConnect Services. Once enrolled, your phone number and vehicle VIN will be used to verify your identity. Requests can be made from the phone number on file and do not require a username/password or PIN. Interactions may be recorded for quality and safety purposes.

You may be eligible for a free trial.

With the purchase of a new Nissan, you may become eligible for a trial of NissanConnect Services. When this occurs, owners will typically get a 1 GB or 30-day trial. During that time period, however, some feature availability may not be available and subject to a subscription.

To see if your vehicle is able to be equipped with NissanConnect Services, click here.

The monthly cost is less than the cost of a month of Netflix.

After your free trial is over, you can purchase Nissan Concierge services for less than the price of a month of Netflix every month.

There may be additional fees.

In addition to the monthly cost, there may be fees for installation, activation, or taxes. You'll want to check with your dealership before committing.

Wondering how your privacy and account security are protected?

The Nissan Legal Privacy Policy here details the legal specifics of information collection in plain terms.

Trending News

Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The Subaru Crosstrek has been refreshed for the 2021 model year.

Photo courtesy of Subaru of America, Inc.

Long beloved for its zippy drivability and spacious cargo area, the Subaru Crosstrek is also just underpowered enough for some drivers to make it a non-starter. The automaker is now offering a 2.5-liter four-cylinder option for the 2021 Subaru Crosstrek.

Buyers can choose the standard 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that delivers 152 horsepower and 145 pound-feet of torque or the 2.5-liter that is shared with the Forester and gets 182 horsepower and 176 pound-feet of torque.

2021 Subaru Crosstrek The car is mostly unchanged at the rear compared to the 2020 model and still just as capable. Photo courtesy of Subaru of America, Inc.

Both engines are paired with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) in most trim levels. The standard six-speed manual transmission in the Base and Premium grades is paired with the smaller engine. Models equipped with the CVT get Intelligent and Sport drive modes.

The larger engine gets 27 mpg in the city, 34 mpg on the highway, and 29 mpg combined. The smaller engine, mated with the CVT, achieves 28 mpg in the city, 33 mpg on the highway, and 30 mpg combined. With the manual, the Crosstrek gets just 22/29/25 mpg city/highway/combined.

All models will continue to be sold with standard all-wheel drive with active torque vectoring technology. Base models get a Low Shift Mode for descending hills.

Models with the CVT come standard with a suite of Subaru EyeSight Driver Assist Technology. That suite now includes adaptive cruise control with lane centering (debuted on the 2020 Outback) in addition to automatic pre-collision braking, pre-collision throttle management, lane departure prevention, lead vehicle start alert, automatic start-stop, rear seat reminder, and SI-Drive.

2021 Subaru Crosstrek The Crosstrek Sport features blacked out interior and exterior elements. The Crosstrek Limited is the most refined model. Photo courtesy of Subaru of America, Inc.

The 2021 Subaru Crosstrek will start at $22,245, just a $100 increase over the price of the 2020 model.

Subaru is adding a Sport grade ($26,495) to the Crosstrek lineup for 2021. It, along with the Limited trim level ($27,995), comes standard with the larger engine. The Crosstrek Sport gets dual-function X-Mode, which also debuted on the Outback, and includes hill descent control with snow/dirt and deep snow/mud selectable settings.

The 2021 Subaru Crosstrek will make its way to a dealership near you this summer.

Trending News

 
 

The Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross takes its name from the beloved cars.

Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors

I wasn't a big car guy growing up. Some kids can tell you the horsepower and engine and endless stats about every car on the road. Or they'll notice the difference in taillights between individual model years, or any of a million other nips and tucks that carmakers do to differentiate their cars.

These days, it's my job to know that stuff, but when I was in high school, I didn't know much — but I knew what a Mitsubishi Eclipse was. As I got ready to write this review, I went back and watched perhaps the most famous 90's-era Mitsubishi Eclipse you could find: Paul Walker's bright green ride in "Fast and the Furious".

2020 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross The car is more traditional up front than it is in the back.Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors

The second-generation Eclipse, built from 1995 to 1999, was the best-known (and best-looking) of all the cars, and became a vehicular icon for my generation in no small part to the role it played in "Fast and the Furious". Though I remember the car, I'd forgotten how terrible this movie is. The dialogue is cringeworthy, the cars are absurd (how many gears does that thing have?), and the story is outlandish. But it's still a hoot, and I may end up rewatching the whole series.

But then in 2011, Mitsubishi ended the Eclipse line for good. Or so we thought. Now we have a new one, only the sporty looks and movie-star glamour is long gone. It's called the Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross and it's... a compact crossover SUV of no particular importance.

That might be a little harsh. It's actually quite an interesting looking vehicle, which is more than can be said for most crossovers. Though the front isn't particularly exciting, the rear has more going for it. There's a dual-window design on the rear tailgate, with a light bar running across the middle. It's very much a love-it-or-hate-it design, but at least it's not boring.

There's a crease running up the doors to the back as well, which looks particularly sharp on the Red Diamond review unit that Mitsubishi sent me for a week. It stickered for $32,720 on the SEL trim, though you can likely negotiate a nice chunk of change off of that at your local Mitsubishi dealer.

2020 Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross The touch screen is okay but the trackpad that is used to navigate it is detrimental.Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors

Feature-wise, the Eclipse Cross is well-equipped, with a tiny 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine that makes 148 horsepower. That's not a ton of power, but for a family crossover it's plentiful and turns in a combined 25 miles per gallon.

Mine had the $2,100 Touring Package, which kicks in a lovely panoramic sunroof, the ever-important adaptive cruise control and pedestrian detection and auto-braking, a heated steering wheel and heated rear seats, and some other minor additions.

If you look at the feature list, the Eclipse Cross is a solid vehicle. The interior design is a little rougher, with hard plastic everywhere and not-so-luxurious touch points. The trackpad to control the screen is terrible, as are the up/down buttons to control the dual-zone climate control (though the heated seats work excellently).

The infotainment screen could be bigger, and the dash screen needs some polish. The engine gets the job done, but it's not exactly quiet. It's a middle-of-the-road crossover. It does what it's supposed to do. You can get it for a good price and it's well-equipped.

Trending News