Design

New tech allows Porsche to give 911 buyers the ultimate personalization option

The technique is only available on the Porsche 911.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

You could say you're putting your truest stamp on it. Porsche has designed a direct printing method for graphic elements on their vehicles that allows customers to have a personalized bonnet straight from the manufacturer. Porsche is first offering the innovation by advertising that they can put your fingerprint on the hood of the car.

Via a service available through Porsche Centers, clients are connected with consultants at the Exclusive Manufaktur in Zuffenhausen. The consultants complete the entire process from conception to printing and delivery.

Porsche fingerprint designThe fingerprint-like design ensures that each model is unique.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

"Individuality is very important for Porsche customers. And no design can be more personal than your own fingerprint," said Alexander Fabig, Vice President Individualization and Classic. "Porsche is a pioneer in personalisation and has developed the direct printing method together with partners. We're especially proud of having developed a completely new product offering based on new technologies. A key factor in this was the different disciplines working together in the project team."

The process was developed in a "technology cell" at Porsche's paint shop in the Zuffenhausen training center. There, new hardware and software, as well as paint blends and the manufacturing process were tested. The process ensured a quality and hardiness that is superior to film application, according to Porsche.

To apply, a direct printing technique is used. It is logistically similar to inkjet printing and uses a print head to apply paint and three-dimensional products without overspray.

"The ability to control the nozzles individually permits targeted application of every paint droplet," explains Christian Will, Vice President Production Development at Porsche AG. "The complexity is due to the necessity of harmonizing three technologies: robot technology (control, sensors, programming), application technology (print head, graphic handling) and paint technology (application process, paint)."

Porsche fingerprint design hood technologyPorsche's unique technology functions similarly to an inkjet printer.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

If a buyer opts for the special design, which will set them back 7,500 euros (including VAT) in Germany, their 911 is completed by the plant then transferred to the technology cell where the hood is removed. The customer's biometric data is processed securely and then a proof is made of the design, approved by the owner, then integrated into a printed graphic that is applied to the hood. A clear coat is added then the bonnet is reinstalled and delivery commences.

To order this unique process on your 911, contact your local Porsche dealership.

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

Front crash preventionwww.youtube.com

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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The Sport Classic comes to the U.S. for the first time next year.

Porsche

Porsche's bringing the 911 Sport Classic back to market, and it's headed to the United States for the first time. The car features distinctive styling, a rowdy twin-turbo flat-six engine, and plenty of go-fast gear from the 911 Turbo S upon which it is based. The car is scheduled for limited release late in 2022 as a 2023 model year.

2021 Porsche 911 Sport ClassicThe Sport Classic comes exclusively with a manual transmission and RWD.Porsche

The Sport Classic gets the Turbo S powertrain, which means a 3.7-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six engine producing 543 horsepower and 442 pound-feet of torque. It's paired exclusively with a seven-speed manual transmission and rear-wheel drive. Porsche says the combo makes the car the most powerful 911 with a manual gearbox currently on sale. The Sport Classic also gets a laundry list of parts from the Turbo S, including Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes, rear-axle steering, a sport exhaust, and an active sport suspension system.

2021 Porsche 911 Sport ClassicThe car comes with an interior not seen since the Porsche 918 Spyder.Porsche

The car' comes with Sport Grey Metallic paint with grey accent stripes, a carbon fiber reinforced plastic hood, and unique graphics on both sides. It rides on 20-inch wheels up front and 21-inch wheels in back, which are designed as reinterpretations of the old-school Fuchs design. In back, the Sport Classic gets unique bodywork that sets it apart from the 911 Turbo, such as deleted air intakes and a large ducktail spoiler. Inside, the 911 gets open-pore wood trim and semi-aniline leather upholstery in cognac and black. Porsche says the Sport Classic is the first car to get that type of leather since the iconic 918 Spyder.

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