Engineering

Maserati's engine of the future is 100% Maserati, 100% made in Modena

The Maserati Nettuno engine is the first one developed by Maserati in decades.

Photo courtesy of Maserati

Maserati is in the midst of a redo. The brand is reshaping its image, starting with its allegiance to its home country of Italy. For months, the automaker, a division of FCA, has been pushing has on the message that its future is fully Italian, despite the looming merger between its American-Italian owner and the French PSA Groupe.

The next step in its product plans was to shift development and production of its engines to Italy. The Maserati Nettuno is the result of a team of Maserati technicians and engineers working at the Maserati Innovation Lab on Via Emilia Ovest and the workshops on Via Delle Nazioni to design the engine. It was developed at the Engine Hub, located at the Viale Ciro Menotti address where it will be built.

Maserati Nettuno engine

Photo courtesy of Maserati


Maserati's new engine is a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter six-cylinder unit with V90-degree architecture. It's capable of delivering 621 horsepower at 7500 rpm and 538 pound-feet of torque from 3000 rpm.

The engine features a dry sump pump and has an 11:1 compression ratio. The stroke is 82 mm and the bore 88 mm.

The Italian automaker says the that "soul of the engine" its its pre-chamber combustion system that features twin-spark plugs. The chamber is set between the central electrode and traditional combustion chamber and connected by a series of specially-designed holes. The lateral spark plug is traditional in its action.

This technology is derived from Formula One use and will make its debut in a passenger car this autumn.

The twin-injection system is linked to the fuel supply pressure at 350 bar, working to reduce noise in the low rev range, which lowers emissions.

Maserati has lowered the traditional development time of an engine by utilizing virtual analysis via the Innovation Lab.

The engine will be employed first in the Maserati MC20, which is set to bring Maserati back to the world of racing. It is expected to debut in September.

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Speedway gas stations will be added to the Seven & i Holdings company portfolio.

Photo courtesy of 7-Eleven

Does this mean slurpies in more places? The owner of 7-Eleven, Seven & i Holdings, has purchased the Speedway chain of gas stations from Marathon Petroleum for $21 billion. The sale is one of the biggest deals that has gone down since the COVID-19 pandemic rocked the economic fortunes of businesses worldwide.

The all-cash deal joins the two convenience store brands with other Seven & i Holdings properties, primarily based in the grocery sector. The company is the largest convenience store chain in Japan, owning 21,000 stores in the Asian country. They also own 9,800 stores in the U.S. and Canada.

Speedway gas station The acquisition adds 4,000 Speedway stores fo the company’s portfolio.Photo courtesy of Speedway

By picking up the Speedway chain of stores, Seven & i Holdings expands their footprint to include an additional 4,000 stores, giving the company a presence in 47 of the top 50 most populated areas in the U.S., the company said in a press release announcing the deal.

7-Eleven President and CEO Joe DePinto explained that the deal will allow the company to diversify its holdings in key regions of the country, "particularly in the Midwest and East Coast."

In Japan, convenience stores are located apart from gas stations. This is also true of many communities in the Eastern U.S. However, in the Midwest and beyond, convenience stores are most often associated with a gas station.

As part of the deal, Marathon will provide 7.7 billion gallons of petroleum a year for 15 years to Seven & i Holdings. Marathon has been struggling in the wake of low gas prices, announcing last week that it will not restart production at refineries in New Mexico and California that had been idled since April.

The two companies had been negotiating the sale for months, struggling to come to an agreement over the price.

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