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Ducati Panigale V4 R gets the LEGO Technic treatment

A working model of the Ducati Panigale V4 R is coming to a LEGO store near you.

Photo courtesy of Ducati

The first LEGO version of a Ducati motorcycle is coming. The Ducati Panigale V4 R is getting the LEGO Technic treatment combining the styling of the motorcycle with working parts of a high-level LEGO model.

"We have all been children fond of LEGO bricks and I think it is easy to understand that this new licensing agreement between Ducati and the LEGO Group is like a dream come true. Two excellences that share the same values of dedication, passion and attention to detail come together to give life to a unique experience", said Alessandro Cicognani, Ducati Licensing Director. "Our hope is that the Ducati Panigale V4 R LEGO Technic can bring together, excite and entertain children and parents, but also all the fans who ride their motorbikes every day."

Ducati Panigale V4 R LEGO Technic

Photo courtesy of Ducati


In real life, the Ducati features a track-tested 998 cc Desmosedici Stradale R engine that achieves 221 horsepower delivered at 15,250 rpm with a traditional exhaust and 234 hp at 15,500 rpm with the Ducati Performance by Akrapovič full-racing exhaust.

The LEGO model has a two-speed gearbox, an innovation for the company and exclusive for this reproduction, which activates the four-cylinder engine. The model also has an original front and rear suspension that move to simulate a GP ride - also a company first.

Additionally, it has front and rear disc brakes, a kickstand, exhaust pipe, windscreen, and dashboard as well as steering designed to give the bike realistic movement.

The LEGO® Technic™ Ducati Panigale V4 R measures 32 cm in length, 16 cm in height and 8 cm in width. It has 646 pieces - about half as many as the typical LEGO Technic car build.

The LEGO Technic Ducati Panigale V4 R model s designed for fans aged 10+ and will be available in. Europe at Ducati dealerships, in the Ducati Online Shop, in LEGO Stores, in the LEGO Online Store and in LEGO Brand Retail Stores starting June 1, priced at €59.99. Americans can get the model starting June 1, online here for $69.99.

The company also sells LEGO Technic versions of the 2020 Land Rover Defender and Nissan GT-R. A new Lamborghini model from the toymaker is coming soon and Dom's Dodge Charger from the "Fast & Furious" movies is now available for order.

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Red light camera usage in the U.S. has declined over the last few years.

Photo by Mathieukor/Getty Images

New research shows that communities across the U.S. are not using as many red light cameras as they used to while implementation of speed detection cameras is increasing. Both have been shows to reduce the occurrence of automobile crashes.

A new checklist devised by AAA, Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and the National Safety Council (NSC) was designed to serve as a roadmap for communities that are establishing or expanding automated enforcement programs and to dispel myths surrounding the use of the cameras.

"Research by IIHS and others has shown consistently that automated enforcement curbs dangerous driving behaviors and reduces crashes," says IIHS President David Harkey. "We hope this document developed with our highway safety partners will help communities take full advantage of this tool."

From 2011 to 2014 more than 500 communities across the U.S. operated red light cameras. Today that number stands at 340. The systems are costly. In 2003, the U.S. Department of Transportation estimated the cost as $67,000 to $80,000 per intersection. That number doesn't include the manpower hours, ticket mailing fees, court costs, or maintenance time and money associated with the ticketing. Today, the cost of the system is estimated to be in the $100,000 range per intersection.

Running red lights kills hundreds and injure tens of thousands of people every year, according to IIHS. In 2019, 846 people were killed and an estimated 143,000 were injured in red light running crashes. Most of those killed were pedestrians, bicyclists and people in other vehicles and not the red light runners or passengers riding with them.

"Red light running and speeding are known killers on our roads," says Advocates President Cathy Chase. "Well-designed and implemented automated enforcement programs can deter these hazardous driving behaviors and reduce crash deaths and injuries. They can also provide an equitable, neutral option for upgrading safety. We urge states and localities to use this checklist together with road safety infrastructure improvements to help protect motorists, bicyclists, pedestrians and other vulnerable road users."

Nearly one-quarter of all traffic fatalities in 2020 (9,478 deaths) occurred due to high speed. Crashes that occur at higher speeds tend to have more severe results.

"We know from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety's research that more than two people are killed every day on U.S. roads by impatient and reckless drivers blowing through red lights," says Jill Ingrassia, AAA's executive director of advocacy and communications. "Automated enforcement can play a role in a comprehensive strategy to address dangerous driving behaviors and improve traffic safety for all road users. This new set of best practice guidelines is an excellent starting point in helping jurisdictions ensure these programs are well-designed, data-driven, transparent and equitably implemented."

Camera laws vary from state to state. Currently, Maine, Mississippi, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia prohibit both red light and speed cameras. Montana and South Dakota disallow red-light cameras, and New Jersey and Wisconsin have outlawed speed cameras.

The checklist features first-, second-, and long-term steps including many common sense action items including:

  • Identifying problem intersections and roadways
  • Make engineering and/or signage changes
  • Establish an advisory committee
  • Identify key stakeholders
  • Utilize safety data to determine camera locations
  • Require regular evaluations
The full checklist is available now at IIHS.org.

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New technology is embedded into the brake caliper.

Photo courtesy of Brembo

Brembo is celebrating 60 years of brand braking history with the debut of a bit of its future. The New G Sessanta Concept is a peek at what the company sees as the future of mobility. It was inspired by the first brake caliper for motorbikes produced by the company, an innovation in 1972.

The company says that the core of the concept is LED technology, which is applied directly to the body of the caliper, a feature that is adaptable to every type of caliper they craft. Brembo sees the tech as being able to enhance the caliper's form and function serving as both an interface and an aesthetic. It will be able to "communicate directly with the user" and "adapt to the user's tastes and preferences". A new video released by Brembo shows the LED color changing via a smartphone app.

 New G Sessanta Concept The New G Sessanta Concept features interactive tech.Photo courtesy of Brembo

Brembo is often known for using bright, flashy colors on its calipers and the new light plays on that. The New G Sessanta is designed to be customizable via wireless technology. When a vehicle equipped with the caliper is stopped, the user can control the desired shade of light to express mood, enhance the style of the bike, or adapt it to the surroundings.

Additionally, the LEDs could use color and light to relay data and information regarding the conditions of the vehicle and caliper itself, or even help localize a parked vehicle by emitting a courtesy light.

Watch the video below to see the vision of the New G Sessanta come to life.

BREMBO “NEW G SESSANTA”: THE NEW BRAKE CALIPER CONCEPT SET TO SHAPE THE FUTURE OF MOBILITY www.youtube.com

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