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Legacy Classic Trucks restomods 1949 Power Wagon adding a turbodiesel, serious off-roading chops

This Dodge Power Wagon has gone from antique to a rough and ready off-roader.

Photo courtesy Legacy Classic Trucks

The latest restomod from Legacy Classic Trucks puts the power back in Dodge Power Wagon. The 108th build from the company features a vintage Power Wagon that has ben transformed from the ground up, giving it more power and the capability to off-road like a modern machine.

"The classic Power Wagons are just amazing trucks, and they are absolute smile magnets when other drivers seem them out on the open road. This is the truck that helped build all the bridges, dams, and roads out West that everyone road trips across during the summertime season," said Legacy Classic Trucks Founder Winslow Bent. "We've had Power Wagons that we've restored that have served in World War II. The best part about a Legacy Power Wagon build is that drivers get all the good looks of a classic restoration without any of the hassles. Drivers won't have any trouble driving this truck out on the street, highway, or off-road. It can do anything."

1949 Legacy Power Wagon

Photo courtesy Legacy Classic Trucks

The 1949 Legacy Power Wagon keeps a twin-turbo Cummins 4BT eight-valve turbodiesel engine. The power output has been raised significantly from the original truck's capability with the new engine's production reaching 350 horsepower and 600 pound-feet of torque. The engine is paired with a five-speed manual transmission.

It now wears Dana 60 axles, ARB locking differentials, and Warn locking hubs. At the front is a Warn winch. Modern Power Wagons also come standard with a winch up front.

The rig's 144-inch wheelbase rides on 40-inch Toyo tires.

The cabin of the truck features bespoke leather seats and grey German square weave carpeted floor mats. The truck's wood steering wheel and vintage gauges give the appearance of vintage styling. There are modern features as well: a Bluetooth stereo, new HVAC system, and USB charging ports.

Legacy Classic Trucks spent 2,000 hours to build the truck. They are selling the model for $350,000. Further upgrades are available.

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First-year Ford F-150 Lightning production numbers doubled
Ford

Ford has begun serial production of the new F-150 Lightning electric pickup truck, marking what could be one of the most important days in recent automotive history. The first trucks rolled off the assembly line at Ford's Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Michigan today, so America's best-selling truck has finally gone electric. Ford wants to sell two million EVs per year by 2026 and have half of its global sales volume to be electric by 2030.

Ford F-150 LightningPast meets future: Ford's new electric pickup will be the F-150 Lightningautomotivemap.com

Ford has seen extreme demand for the trucks, with 200,000 reservations since the books opened. To deliver, the automaker plans to increase production to an annual rate of 150,000 units by next year, which involved huge investments in the Rouge Center and created hundreds of jobs. Ford's total investment for the F-150 Lightning crests $1 billion across Michigan alone, and has created 1,700 jobs across various facilities in the state.

Ford F-150 LightningThe first production trucks left the factory today.
Ford Motor Company

Though the Lightning starts around $40,000, the most mainstream models will cost much more than that. The F-150 Lightning Pro, while affordable, is a stripped-down truck intended for commercial buyers. It's still a forward-looking electric truck with amazing capabilities, but it lacks much of the creature comforts and features that everyday drivers expect. Higher trims get the latest driver assistance features, including BlueCruise, which is Ford's semi-autonomous hands-free driving assistant. A 12-inch touchscreen is standard, along with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, navigation, a Wi-Fi hotspot, and more.

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American muscle cars

Ford Mustang continues sales dominance

2021 Ford Mustang Mach 1
Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Ford has good reason to be proud of the Mustang. Now almost 60 years on from its introduction, Ford continues innovating with new versions and performance upgrades. It's all good news for buyers, as it's hard to find a "bad" Mustang in Ford's current catalog. The efforts have paid off, too, as the automaker just announced that the Mustang outsold its competition for the seventh year in a row.

2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

The Mustang continued outselling the Chevrolet Camaro and Dodge Challenger, and did so without help from the Shelby GT350, which was discontinued. The Mustang Mach 1, with its 5.0-liter V8, led the charge, but Ford notes the performance of its most powerful Mustang, the Shelby GT500.

Ford says Americans are the most prolific Mustang buyers, representing 76 percent of the car's worldwide sales. Mustang sales in New Zealand grew 54 percent and Brazil saw sales climb 37.3 percent, so the car is a global effort for Ford. The automaker notes that retail orders, where a customer places an order for a car instead of shopping for one off the lot, almost doubled last year.

1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 Photo courtesy of Ted Fontenot

The 2022 Mustang may mark the last year of the car's current generation. Spy photographers have caught next-generation cars testing in the wild, and the current-gen cars have been on sale since 2015. Ford also expanded the Mustang name in 2021 with the addition of the new electric Mustang Mach-E, which was met with huge demand and several awards from around the auto industry.

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