Hollywood

1992 Lamborghini Diablo from 'Die Another Day' up for sale (Pierce Brosnan not included)

James Bond film "Die Another Day" featured a number of desirable cars.

Photo courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.

In the 2002 film "Die Another Day" Pierce Brosnan, as James Bond, is tasked with locating a mole inside the British intelligence community who betrayed him. The film, and the roster of vehicles in it, proved to be a hit with audiences.

One of the vehicles featured in the Bond production is a 1992 Lamborghini Diablo. Well, not a full Diablo. You see, Eon Productions, the company that makes the Bond franchise, purchased just a shell of the vehicle. The model is first seen by audiences when troops under the command of Colonel Tan-Sun Moon (Will Yun Lee) are cleaning the vehicle alongside a Ferrari F355 Berlinetta, Porsche 911 Carrera, Mercedes-Benz SL, Ford GT40 and Jaguar XKR, according to Fandom.com.

1992 Lamborghini Diablo from 'Die Another Day' In the movie, Bond (and a few cars) escape a plane crash.Photo courtesy of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.

Bond, who is being held captive, eventually escapes, but the Porsche does not, falling victim to the antics of the spy. Later in the film, the cars are seen in the cargo hold of Gustav Graves (Toby Stephens), the alter ego of Moon. With Bond in hot pursuit, Moon, from aboard his plane, reveals that he plans to use the Icarus satellite to cut a path through the Korean Demilitarized Zone that would allow North Korea to invade South Korea.

Graves's plan is foiled by Bond to attempts to shoot him, only to pierce a hole in the fuselage of the plane. A series of struggles ensues and the Icarus beam hits the plane further injuring it. Graves attempts to escape but before he can, Bond pulls his parachute open, which pulls Graves out of the plane and into one of the engines. Bond escapes, relatively unscathed.

While the Diablo didn't survive in the film's plot line, landing in a field in South Korea along with the Ferrari, but it did survive the filming itself.

It now is being sold by Beverly Hills Car Club for $119,500 after being sold by the studio in 2002 for $25,000.

1992 Lamborghini Diablo from 'Die Another Day' The shell has been equipped to a proper V12 engine and other components.Photo courtesy of Beverly Hills Car Club

The European spec model has a Diable Rosso red paint job and a black interior with red piping. The odometer as 45,205 miles on it and the Carfax report comes back clean. It is powered by a 5.7-liter V12 engine that is paired with a five-speed manual transmission. It has power windows, four-wheel disc brakes, and OZ racing staggered wheels.

The seller reveals that the clutch will need to be replaced.

It comes with an invoice from Eon Productions that includes a VIN that matches the vehicle being sold.

Trending News

Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The Lamborghini Urraco celebrates its 50th birthday this year.

Photo courtesy of Lamborghini Automobili

It's been 50 years since Lamborghini made the first Urraco. You're excused if you don't remember it. The car's nine-year run moved the brand forward, starting out as a technologically advanced model and eventually making way for the Gallardo and, ultimately, the Huracán.

The model was originally created at the request of Ferruccio Lamborghini, who was eager to expand the company's production and make a Lamborghini that would be accessible to a wider audience.

Lamborghini says that the car's innovative place in the market was thanks in large part of the car's engineer Paolo Stanzani who was Lamborghini's Chief Technical Officer at the time.

Lamborghini Urraco

Photo courtesy of Lamborghini Automobili

The 2+2 coupe featured a mid-mounted 2.5-liter V8 rear engine and independent suspension. Rhe Urraco featured the double novelty of an eight-cylinder engine and distribution with a single overhead camshaft per bank. According to the automaker, the technical refinement was "completed by the use of a 'Heron chamber' engine head with flat inner part and the combustion chamber contained in a depression in the top of the piston". This engineering solution made it possible to achieve a higher compression ratio without increasing the costs.

Initially, the Urraco was rated to achieve 220 horsepower and have a top speed of 152 mph.

It had a MacPherson strut system on the front and rear - a first for a production car. It also uniquely had four Weber double-body 40 IDF1 type carburetors.

The Urraco interior measures 167 inches long, about as long as the 2020 Nissan Kicks. Positioning the instrument cluster and dished steering wheel was a particular challenge because of the tight squeeze.

Lamborghini introduced the car to the market as the P250 Urraco, where the "P" stood for the rear (posterior) position of the engine, and 250 for the engine capacity (2.5 liters). That version was produced from 1970 to 1976. The automaker sold 520 Urracos during that stretch.

At the 1974 Turin Motor Show, the P200 debuted as a model focused on the Italian market. It sold from 1975-1977 with 66 models being produced.

The last version of the Urraco, the P300, was produced from 1975 to 1979. Lamborghini sold 190 of them during that time.

Trending News

 
 

The Outlierman is offering two new varieties of driving gloves

Photo courtesy of The Outlierman

The Outlierman, a Bologna, Italy-based accessories company, launched two new driving gloves. The perforated suede driving gloves and fingerless leather gloves are part of the Bad One collection.

"As every driving enthusiast knows, grip and feel are key ingredients of every great drive," says Andrea Mazzuca, founder of The Outlierman. "A car's tyres and steering provide those pleasures, but a good pair of driving gloves can heighten those sensations to another level and enhance every road trip no matter how long or short.

The Outlierman Aston Martin driving gloves The gloves allow for a good level of breathability.Photo courtesy of The Outlierman

Featuring black Nappa leather and red suede back, the perforated driving gloves are crafted in Italy. The suede back is meant to recall the interior of sports cars while the red is emblematic of the passion of racing. Leather perforation ensures a level of breathability.

Also handcrafted in Italy, the fingerless leather driving gloves are made of Nappa lamb skin. The gloves are slightly perforated to ensure breathability and feature what The Outlierman calls "bold traits for a unique style".

Buyers recieve their gloves in a handmade leather case that offers protection.

The Outlierman sells the gloves in a variety of sizes. Buyers can use the sizing tool on the company's website to ensure fit is proper.

Perforated leather driving gloves by The Outlierman

Photo courtesy of The Outlierman

The perforated suede driving gloves are priced at €280 and the fingerless leather driving gloves are priced at €220. They can be purchased at TheOutlierman.com.

Trending News