Anniversary

Jaguar E-Type 60th anniversary models celebrate the car’s unique origin story

The Jaguar E-Type Collection celebrates the 60th anniversary of the E-Type’s debut

Photo courtesy of JDHT

It's been nearly 60 years since the iconic Jaguar E-Type first arrived. The model was revealed in Geneva, Switzerland in March 1961. Jaguar will pay homage to the models by creating six matched pairs of E-Types, the E-Type 60 Collection.

Each pair of the collection pays tribute to the two oldest E-Types, both known by their registration plate. The “9600 HP" and “77 RW" both played pivotal roles in the unveiling of the car.

1961 Geneva Jaguar E-Type Reveal A roadster and coupe model were shown to select guests at the '61 debut.Photo courtesy of JDHT

Coated in an Opalescent Gunmetal Grey paint job, the 3.8-liter fixed-head coupe registered “9600 HP" was the first of two E-Types unveiled to specially-invited guests at the Parc des Eaux Vives in 1961. It was driven “flat out" to Switzerland from Coventry the night before the launch with public relations manager Bob Berry arriving at the venue mere minutes before demonstration drives were set to begin.

Reactions were overwhelmingly positive and Berry couldn't keep up with demand for the model drives. Jaguar Test and Development Engineer Norman Dewis was told to “drop everything" and drive a British Racing Green 3.8-liter roadster registered “77 GW" overnight from Coventry to Geneva.

He made it in time and the rest, as they say, is history.

1961 Geneva Jaguar E-Type Reveal Registration plate “77 RW" is reserved for the roadster.Photo courtesy of JDHT

"The Jaguar E-type is a genuine icon, as sensational today as the moment it was unveiled in 1961," said Dan Pink, Director of Jaguar Classic. “It's testament to the E-type's advanced design and engineering that it can still be enjoyed and admired as passionately almost 60 years on.

"The E-type 60 Collection is a lasting tribute for E-type admirers, honouring the car's legacy and the achievements of the team that created it – many of whom have descendants working for Jaguar Classic today, expertly restoring, maintaining and future-proofing enjoyment for generations to come."

Each E-Type 60 Collection model is an original 1960s 3.8-liter E-Type that has been fully restored to exclusive 60th anniversary tribute specification.

1961 Geneva Jaguar E-Type Reveal Both models were hotly sought after for test drives by potential buyers.Photo courtesy of JDHT

The set will include one Flat Out Gray “9600 HP" coupe and one Drop Everything Green “77 RW" roadster. The unique paint formulation is exclusively reserved for these cars. Jaguar Design Director Julian Thomson has given each model commemorative design details to celebrate the anniversary.

Trending News

Nuts & Bolts

 
 

Photo courtesy of Classic Car Auctions

Next weekend, Classic Car Auctions (CCA) will auction off a collection of cars from the early 20th Century. Part of The Warwickshire Collection Part II, the models span a range of decades and marques. Earlier this year, Silverstone Auctions successfully sold The Warwickshire Collection Part I.

"We are delighted to have the opportunity to offer these 89 rare and collectable cars," said Gary Dunne, CCA's Sales Manager. "The Warwickshire Collection features some really interesting examples and furthermore, a proportion of the cars are offered without reserve, so this collection is not to be missed".

Below are four of the 89 models, with descriptions provided by CCA.

1949 Bentley MkVI

One of the stand outs is the 1949 Bentley MkVI two-door Coupe with "New Look" bodywork by James Young (as seen at the top of this article) which is estimated at £40,000 - £50,000. At the time, the design was somewhat polarising and just three were ordered, however, hindsight tells us that the appearance of the "New Look" has since influenced the design of many luxury cars since. Finished in Silver with Tudor Grey over a red leather interior, this is an important car in Bentley's history.

1961 Morris Minor Million

Photo courtesy of Classic Car Auctions

Another special car in the collection is the Lilac 1961 Morris Minor Million, which is one of 349 examples made to celebrate the production of one million Morris Minors. CCA are offering number 21, which features its special choice of colour, white leather seats trimmed with black, wheel trim embellishers and the Morris 1,000,000 badging on the rear. MA2S31000021 is estimated at £15,000 – 20,000

1932 BSA "Family Four" Vee Twin Three-Wheeler

Photo courtesy of Classic Car Auctions

One of the oldest cars in the collection is the 1932 BSA 'Family Four' Vee Twin Three-Wheeler which benefitted from a bare metal restoration in 2009 and has since travelled just a small amount of miles. The restoration retained an extensive list of all the major components that were original to the car including the engine and chassis. The body was completely rebuilt using new ash framework as required, although 40% of it is original and the car is estimated at £8,000 - £10,000.

1953 Ford Consul Mk1 Farnham Estate

Photo courtesy of Classic Car Auctions

The last of four cars to be previewed from the 89-strong collection is the 1953 Ford Consul Mk1 Farnham Estate. This example is a well-known show car and is fresh from the British Motor Museum in Gaydon. Finished in Dorchester Grey, it is fitted with an exterior sun visor, chrome luggage rack, driving lamps, badge bar and signpost light and is estimated at £7,000 - £9,000.

For this auction, the buyers premium is 11% + VAT and bidding is available online with either The Saleroom or Proxibid, on the telephone or via a commission (pre) bid. The auction takes place on September 18 and 19.

Trending News

 
 

One South Carolina man has collected 40 Volkswagen models in the last 42 years, selling off many along the way.

Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

When you hear that someone has owned 42 vehicles in the last 40 years, your first question will probably be, "Why?" Add in the fact that they've all been Volkswagens and the answer gets even more interesting.

Taylor Bryant, a Charleston, South Carolina native, has always had a soft spot for Volkswagens. Growing up in the Palmetto State, Bryant would ride his bicycle to the local VW dealership and chat up the technicians.

Forty years ago, Bryant spotted a 1961 Volkswagen Beetle waiting at a red light. He approached the driver and asked if he would be willing to sell it. A few weeks and $500 later, the light blue Beetle was his.

Volkswagen Taylor Bryant Bryant has restored, fixed up, and turned around a number of Volkswagens to help fund his habit.Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

"I drove it all the way through high school and the beginning of college. It really got me into cars because I had to work on it constantly," Bryant said. "You can't pay a whole lot of people to work on your car on a Taco Bell salary at 16."

Bryant went on to earn a degree in automotive technology from Aiken Technical College in South Carolina in 2001 and worked as a Volkswagen master auto technician for 12 years. During that time, Bryant built his own car collection adding a wide variety of models to his collection including a Corrado, original Beetle, Golf, Jetta, and Tiguan.

Starting and maintaining a car collection isn't cheap. Bryant would often buy trade-in vehicles and took them on as project cars. Once a car was complete, he would sell it for whatever money he put into it and use the earnings to fund the next build.

"I pretty much love them all [and] have touched or owned all of them at some point," said Bryant.

Those Volkswagens have played key roles in Bryant's life. He ran for school board in 2010 and used a 2005 Jetta GLI as his campaign car. Bryant bought his wife a Cabriolet for their fifth wedding anniversary, and his son's first car was a Jetta.

His current collection includes a 1999 Jetta, a 2004 Passat Wagon, and a 2017 Jetta. He recently spotted one of his favorite project cars – a beautifully restored red 1967 Karmann Ghia – for sale on Facebook Marketplace.

"It was pretty neat to see a car I restored 20 years ago still running around and looking beautiful," Bryant said.

In 2013, after 12 years of working as a Volkswagen mechanic, he left the shop to become an instructor at Augusta Technical College in Georgia. "It feels really good to give back to the career that has given me everything I've ever had," Bryant said.

Trending News