High-Tech Problem Solvers

This is what the future of mobility in San Francisco looks like (according to Hyundai)

Hyundai's Executive Vice Chairman Euisun Chung talks about the future of mobility and cities at the Mobility Innovators Forum.

Photo courtesy of Hyundai Motor America

They have a vision. Hyundai Motor Group is showcasing its mobility solutions using a stylized version of what the company sees is a version of the future of San Francisco.

The overall aesthetic is like something straight out of the era when Isaac Asimov dared people to dream about Daneel Olivaw solving crimes and the Space Race was exciting school children and their parents alike.

It features a lush paradise, something that anyone who has been to San Francisco recently can attest is a far cry from its modern existence. Drones fly by the Golden Gate Bridge while gardens and water features play prominently.

San Francisco 2050 Hyundai's team has come up with their version of what San Francisco could look like by 2050.Image courtesy of Hyundai Motor America

Rather than robots taking charge, like what the crew from Boston Dynamics would have you believe is imminent, Hyundai is taking a human-centric (and perhaps more realistic) approach to their vision of the future, as presented during a keynote speech delivered by Executive Vice Chairman Euisun Chung at the Mobility Innovators Forum.

Hyundai put forth their philosophy that "technology and innovation should be directed towards serving the needs of people."

"Cities and mobility services were developed for humans from the very beginning," said Chung. "That's why we are making a wide range of efforts to study a human-centered future from a broader humanities perspective."

As a way of following through on their principle, Hyundai Motor Group has set up the Human-Centered City Advisory Group, which is comprised of experts with engineering, urban planning, and psychology backgrounds. Using their input, the Group has been developing a blueprint for future cities over the last year with the goal of publishing the research results by 2020.

Hyundai Motor Group has also been conducting the 2050 Future City Project to make predictions on future cities in different regions to serve as a guideline for future smart city development.

The Mobility Innovators Forum is a conference hosted by Hyundai CRADLE that is deigned to bring together leaders in the technology, energy, policy, design, and academia fields to discuss challenges and opportunities in development.

Hyundai CRADLE is Hyundai Motor Group's corporate venturing and open innovation business, which partners and invests in global startups in a number of fields.

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Ford has teamed up with Microsoft to study traffic congestion.

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

Computers are everywhere. We wear them on our wrists, carry them in our pockets, and rely on them to function in a modern world. As computing evolves, automakers like Ford are using high-level technology to work to solve everyday problems.

The Dearborn, Michigan-based automaker has partnered with Microsoft to simulate the impact thousands of vehicles traveling has on congestion. They're early in to the project, still developing the quantum computing aspects of the project, which will take the problems of today and scale them to predict the problems of tomorrow. Then, the two companies will use the information to dive deeper into possible solutions to those problems.

"Quantum computing has the potential to transform the auto industry and the way we move," said Julie Love, senior director of quantum computing business development, Microsoft. "To do that we need to have a deep understanding of the problems that companies like Ford want to solve, which is why collaborations like these are so important."

When rush hour happens and congestion picks up, it's not uncommon for drivers to use various apps to change their route using traffic apps like Waze. However, these apps often route drivers the same way, creating congestion on side streets. Ideally, new computing would work to balance those routes to allow the least amount of congestion possible on all streets.

Dr. Ken Washington, Chief Technology Officer, Ford Motor Company described the problem and possible solution in a recent post on Medium.

Simply put, it's not feasible to have traditional computers find the optimal solution from a huge number of possible route assignments in a timely manner. That's where quantum computing can help. Essentially, existing digital computers translate information into either a 1 or a 0, otherwise known as a bit. But in a quantum computer, information can be processed by a quantum bit (or a qubit) that can simultaneously exist in two different states before it gets measured. Upon measurement, however, either a 1 or a 0 appears randomly and the probability for each is governed by a set of rules called quantum mechanics.

This ultimately enables a quantum computer to process information with a faster speed. Attempts to simulate some specific features of a quantum computer on non-quantum hardware have led to quantum-inspired technology — powerful algorithms that mimic certain quantum behaviors and run on specialized conventional hardware. That enables organizations to start realizing some benefits before fully-scaled quantum hardware becomes available.

The partnership between Microsoft and Ford started in 2018 to specifically focus on reducing traffic congestion in Seattle, a city undergoing tremendous rapid growth that is confined in its footprint by waterways and mountains.

The collaboration tested numerous scenarios in their efforts to solve Seattle's traffic congestion, with as many as 5,000 vehicles. Each vehicle in the scenario had 10 different route choices. In 20 seconds, computing software weighed each of those suggestions and delivered a route that resulted in a 73 percent improvement in total congestion compared to traditional route suggestion methods. The result was an eight percent drop in the time of the commute.

Ford remains hopeful that future advances in quantum computing will further the company's mission to work to reduce congestion.

Atlas is one of Volkswagen's top-selling models in the U.S. and though it seems like just yesterday that it debuted on the heels of the Dieselgate scandal, the automaker is already preparing to give it a facelift.

Volkswagen has confirmed that the 2021 Volkswagen Atlas will sport a revised grille, head- and taillights, and front and rear bumpers when it arrives on dealer lots later in 2020. It will also have interior upgrades, and new driver-assistance and technology features.

Many of the refreshed elements come straight from the 2020 Atlas Cross Sport's design.

The three sketches that were shown as part of the tease show a more rounded, upright, and smirking grille at the front of the Atlas. Its headlights have a straighter LED light signature. The SUV's lower fascia has changed to show a more aggressive bottom half complete with the hint of a faux skid plate alongside repositioned and smaller fog light housings. Changes at the back aren't nearly as obvious.

2021 Volkswagen Atlas

Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

Volkswagen has released these sketches of the forthcoming 2021 Volkswagen Atlas.

VW has said that the changes add three inches to the length of the vehicle.

There aren't a lot of specifics about what potential buyers can expect from the interior upgrades but previous statements from Volkswagen indicate that there will be a new D-shaped steering wheel, an eight-inch infotainment touch screen, and wireless device charging.

Volkswagen will add new driver assistance technology to the model including adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go functionality and low-speed lane centering.

It's likely that the public's first look at the refreshed Atlas will come in February at the Chicago Auto Show.