High-Tech Problem Solvers

Hyundai's new next-level noise canceling technology to debut on new Genesis model

Hyundai is employing new noise cancelling technology in an upcoming Genesis model.

Photo courtesy of Hyundai Motor Group

Noise cancelling technology has been around for a while and is employed by nearly every automaker. Whether it's dense foam insulation, thick carpets, technological innovations, or recommending a certain tire compound, there are many ways automakers work to keep road and engine noise from permeating the cabin.

Hyundai is taking those traditional methods of sound-blocking even further with the world's first Road Noise Active Noise Control (RANC) system, which the company says "dramatically reduces" cabin noise.

RANC is the next step in active noise control technology and works by emitting sound waves that have been inverted to incoming noise. Think of it like two magnets repelling each other.

Previously, active noise control technology only allowed predicted noises to be able to be muted.

"RANC is a remarkable technology which takes existing noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) technology to the next level," said Gangdeok Lee, a Research Fellow of NVH Research Lab, "We will continue to take the leading position of NVH highest level of quietness to customers."

Hyundai Genesis noise cancelling RANCHyundai has developed new noise cancelling technology that uses sound waves to repel incoming sound waves.Photo courtesy of Hyundai Motor Group

The new RANC technology, which took six years to develop, analyzes road noise in real time, using an acceleration sensor, and calculates the vibration from the road to the car. A computer analyzes the results and the system optimizes the signal in less than 0.002 seconds, adjusting accordingly.

RANC is able to calculate the sound independently for the driver, passenger, and rear seats.

Hyundai testing revealed that RANC is able to reduce in-cabin noise by 3dB, roughly half of what is currently experienced in Hyundai vehicles.

This technology has further reaching implications. Because Hyundai will not have to rely on heavy, dense foams and carpet to help with cabin noise, they are able to lessen the amount of or remove those elements from vehicles, allowing for more passenger space and less weight. In turn, this could make vehicles more fuel efficient.

The system will be mass produced by Harman.

Hyundai Motor Group has completed domestic and American patent applications for the location of sensors and signal selection method, the core technology of RANC.

The technology will begin to be applied to an upcoming Genesis model.

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New electric SUV

The Genesis GV60 is on sale now

The GV60 is on sale in the U.S. now.

Genesis

Today, Genesis announced that its newest vehicle, the electric GV60, is on sale in the United States. The vehicle brings a load of new tech and innovations, and features the brand's distinctive, attractive styling.

The GV60 will be offered in two configurations in the United States. The GV60 Advanced AWD starts at $58,890 and features a facial unlocking system, a 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster and touchscreen, and a Bang & Olufsen audio system. The GV60 Performance AWD starts at $67,890 and brings more power, leather upholstery, a massaging driver's seat, and more.

2023 Genesis GV60Buyers get three years of free charging. Genesis

The Advanced model comes with a 74-kW front and 160-kW rear electric motor for a total of 314 horsepower. A 77.4-kWh battery provides juice for the operation, and returns a range of 248 miles. The Performance AWD model features a 160-kW front and 160-kW rear motor for a combined 429 horsepower, with up to 483 ponies available with a temporary boost mode.

Genesis partnered with Electrify America to provide GV60 owners with three years of free 30-minute charging sessions. Owners can charge anywhere in the United States, and can locate charging stations using their vehicle's navigation system. The GV60 is also the first Genesis to feature Connected Care, which includes several connected services such as enhanced roadside assistance, an SOS emergency notification feature, vehicle health reports, and more.

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

Front crash preventionwww.youtube.com

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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