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Hot Wheels crowns "Nashhole" a winner in Las Vegas, new model coming in 2020

Hot Wheels held a worldwide competition to find its next model car.

Photo courtesy of Hot Wheels

Hot Wheels began their worldwide tour to find the next popular collectable toy car in March in Miami and wrapped it up last week at SEMA. Working, real-sized automobiles competed against each other for the chance to have their likeness be transformed in miniature into the newest contents of gleaming packages hanging in drug stores and toy shops.

"This tour is all about finding the custom car out there worthy of becoming a Hot Wheels," said Ted Wu, VP of Senior Design at Hot Wheels. "This year has been amazing, we have seen 90,000 people come out to our events, 5,000 cars entered the shows with 20 nationwide stops."

Legends Tour judges rated each contestant in regional contests using three attributes:

  • Authenticity- a car that embodies Hot Wheels with a radical look and amazing performance.
  • Creativity - a car that is unique with details and stands out from the rest.
  • Garage Spirit - built and not bought with a great story behind it.


2019 SEMA Nashhole winner Hot Wheels Legends The winner's car was chosen based on its authenticity, creativity, and the story behind its creation.Photo courtesy of Hot Wheels

The Regional winners that were part of the SEMA final included:

  • Miami- 1947 Steampunk Willys rat rod with military accents, motorcycle wheels and tires, and a tractor seat
  • Houston -1972 Luv truck that was put back together 30 years later after the original owner passed away
  • Atlanta - 1975 Chevy Impala Low Rider nicknamed "GQ"
  • Los Angeles - 1957 Nash Metropolitan with exposed wheels and tires that's powered by a small block Chevy 305
  • Charlotte - 1936 Chevy Custom truck that started as sedan then transformed into a four-door dually with a 750-horsepower Cummins engine
  • Philadelphia – 1968 Toyota Land Cruiser that took 3 years to build and has 5 inches chopped off with a custom chassis and a 12-cylinder BMW engine
  • New York/New Jersey – A combination 1948 Chevy Pickup and 1960 Cadillac owned by Mike Calderone was built in 1989 using four different cars
  • Detroit – 1957 Custom Studebaker that is powered by a 4.6-liter B8 Lincoln modular engine
  • Chicago- 1965 Pontiac GTO was inspired by the owner's father's gasser stories
  • Bentonville – 1969 International Harvester Cabover 1600 that has a supercharged 350 Chevy engine and a spoiler to balance the truck
  • St. Louis – 1976 Chevy Vega nicknamed "RCR" with a LS3 engine
  • Dallas - 2002 Honda S2000 that was modified after its owner went to a technical school
  • Seattle – 1971 VW Bug with three inches chopped off and a removable hardtop added
  • Phoenix- 1971 VW Squareback that's a twin-engine gasser.
  • Denver- 1954 Chevy Bel Air that has 6.5 inches chopped off the top and 15 inches added on the back
  • San Jose – 1995 Honda Civic with a beefy 450-horsepower engine that runs on E85
  • San Diego – 1960 Renault Dauphine was originally found on Facebook Marketplace after being stored for 40 years
  • Los Angeles –This car is a combination of a 1974 Opel Manta/Nissan 240SX

2019 SEMA Hot Wheels Legends Nash winner car This replica Chevy 305 engine powers the Hot Wheels toy version of the Hot Wheels Legends contest winner. Photo courtesy of Hot Wheels

All the regional cars competed in the final and were judged by a crew that included noted automotive enthusiasts Adam Corolla, Richard Rawlings, and Jay Leno.

The winner was the 1957 Nash Metropolitan, known as the "Nashhole" and owned by Greg Salzillo and Dave Ford. Hot Wheels enthusiasts can expect a miniature replica of the "Nashhole" in stores in 2020.

Two different versions of the Tesla Cybertruck will reach customers before the actual truck does.

Photo courtesy of Hot Wheels

Upon its debuted, one or two of the reveal attendees may have mentioned something about it looking more like a toy than a for-real truck. Now, Hot Wheels is giving the Tesla Cybertruck the full toy (and collectable) treatment. In the true spirit of Tesla, the new models are electrified.

The two radio-controlled Hot Wheels toys are described by MattelCreations.com as, "Hot Wheels packs the power and performance of the futuristic Cybertruck into two small-scale, remote-control vehicles: a track-compatible 1:64 scale and a limited-edition hobby grade 1:10 scale. It's the only way to drive the Cybertruck in 2020!"

1:64 Hot Wheels R/C Cybertruck & 1:10 Hot Wheels R/C Cybertruck – Limited Edition

Photo courtesy of Hot Wheels

Here is the features of the 1:64 model straight from Hot Wheels:

  • The 3-inch, radio-control Cybertruck combines the modern Tesla design with the iconic Hot Wheels
  • Race on Hot Wheels® track – on a horizontal track race or take it vertical on a classic Hot Wheels® track loop. I mean, we're Hot Wheels®, after all.
  • Key features include two-wheel drive with both Chill or Sport speed to reach up to 500mph scale speed and recharging from controller. You're welcome.

The 1:10 mode's features include:

  • Functioning headlights and taillights to maintain visibility
  • All-wheel drive featuring Chill or Sport modes
  • Tonneau "Vault" cover
  • Telescopic tailgate that folds out into loading ramp
  • Removeable plastic body to reveal interior and access internal battery and drivetrain system
  • Reusable cracked window vinyl sticker
  • 9.9V, 3300mAh, rechargeable battery, 1:1 charge/run time

Hot Wheels, which is owned by Mattel, the same company that sells Barbie dolls, has already sold out of the larger 1:10 scale size model, which retailed for $400. It will likely hit an eBay store near you shortly after shipments begin for a much higher price .

There is a chance that Hot Wheels will opt to make more of the models available. They're offering a signup page where prospective buyers can input their email address to be notified if additional production capacity is confirmed.

The 1:64 model is just $20 and will be available to ship on December 15, 2020.

The Tesla Cybertruck is for licensed drivers ages 16 and up. The 1:10 HotWheels models is recommended for children and adults ages 14 and up. Children and adults over the age of five are the intended audience of the 1:64 model.

Hot Wheels recently teamed up with Jaguar to create a 1:64 model of the 2021 Jaguar F-Type.