Under the Hood

Honda's vehicles are 14 percent more fuel efficient than the industry average

Honda has several manufacturing facilities in the U.S. All are under orders to go greener.

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

Honda's U.S. fleet of vehicles is 14 percent more fuel-efficient than the industry average when it comes to fuel economy according to recently-released report on the company's environmental activities in North America.

Among the highlights of the Honda-produced report's findings is that for the 2019 model year, the unadjusted average fuel economy of the company's U.S. automobile fleet decreased 3.6 percent, to 37.5 mpg, but remains 14 percent higher (better than) the industry average of 32.9 mpg.

The 2021 Honda Insight has received new safety technology, has best-in-class passenger space, and achieves 55 mpg. Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

That's no small number. On a car with a 14-gallon fuel tank, the average Honda has 525 miles of range with a full tank while the industry average vehicle would have 460.

During that same period, the unadjusted average CO2 emissions for the company's U.S. automobile fleet is 11.9 percent below (better than) the industry average of 269 g/mi.

It's not just cars that are proving to be more fuel-efficient. The average fuel economy of Honda U.S. motorcycle fleet in model year 2019 was up 10.7 percent from a year ago.

"Throughout this challenging year, our associates have continued to reduce our environmental impact throughout our processes," said Shinji Aoyama, president & CEO of American Honda Motor Co. Inc. "We remain committed to realizing our long-term vision for a zero-carbon society, while finding new and innovative ways for our technology to benefit the world."

In addition to its vehicles, Honda's manufacturing facilities have been getting greener. Total location-based CO2e emissions from North American manufacturing decreased 4.5% to its lowest level in seven years. Solid waste from manufacturing was down 6.2 percent and water usage fell 3.3 percent. Emissions from auto body painting decreased to their lowest level in a decade.

The biggest number is the next one. Ninety-nine percent of the waste from Honda's 12 U.S. parts warehousing and distribution centers was recycled during the 2019 fiscal year. Additionally, carbon dioxide emissions intensity of North American service parts shipments fell 4.2 percent moving the dial to a 49.7 percent reduction over the past decade.

This marks the 16th consecutive year that Honda has released detailed data on the environmental impact of its operations in North America.

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The Center for Creative Education in Palm Beach County, Florida, was one of the recipients of grant money.

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

Non-profit programs with a focus on science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM), as well as the environment, were recipients of a number of grants totaling $700,000 from the American Honda Foundation, the charitable arm of American Honda Motor Co. The 12 recipients from the spring and summer grant cycle come from six states.

"A key focus of the American Honda Foundation is to support the success of young people and inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers," said Alexandra Warnier, executive director of the American Honda Foundation. "We commend the Foundation's grant recipients on their incredible efforts to provide students with experiential STEAM learning opportunities."

American Honda Foundation, Two-Bit Circus Foundation The Two-Bit Circus Foundation received a grant to enhance teaching surrounding critical thinking.Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc

Grant recipients for the first half of the Foundation's fiscal year include:

  • CEC Stuyvesant Cove, Inc. (dba Solar One): Through the organization's Green Design Lab program and curriculum, students, teachers and custodial staff in the New York City school system learn about environmental STEM subjects and work together to design and implement feasible, creative ways to reduce their school and community's environmental footprint. This is part of the City's overall plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Center for Creative Education: The Center for Creative Education's teaching artists collaborate with kindergarten through third grade classroom teachers in Palm Beach County, Fla., to deliver curriculum that integrates the arts such as painting, dancing, music and drama into content areas such as science, language arts, and math. This teaching approach boosts student engagement and long-term memory gains, with students achieving at higher rates than non-participating peers attending the same public schools.
  • Elementary Institute of Science: The organization's STEP-2-STEM program provides access to high-quality STEM learning activities for students attending 11 Title I elementary schools in the San Diego, Calif. area. The program promotes early exposure to subjects such as biology, computer science, chemistry and engineering to help build strong foundations for STEM learning in later grades.
  • Imagine Science: In an effort to narrow the opportunity gap for underserved youth, Imagine Science is a collaboration between four major youth service organizations: Boys & Girls Clubs, Girls Inc., National 4-H Council, and Y-USA. Youth in participating Imagine Science communities benefit from hands-on STEM activities integrated into an array of one-time or multi-week youth development programs in hopes of inspiring the next generation of scientific thinkers and problem solvers.
  • Jones Valley Teaching Farm: Using food, farming and the culinary arts, instructors deliver experiential lessons that align with academic standards in math, science, social studies and English language arts. Teaching Farms on school campuses in Birmingham, Ala., provide an environment where Pre-K through 12th grade students can learn, create, and grow a healthy future for themselves and their community.
  • Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired: Teens and younger kids who are blind or have low vision are mentored by blind STEM professionals and gain new exposure to the sciences through year-round science enrichment activities. During the summer STEM camp at Enchanted Hills Camp for the Blind in Napa, Calif., participants focus on general science exploration, computer coding and environmental science. These programs help blind students gain interest, experience and confidence that increase academic and career success.
  • Reality Changers: With a focus on building academic performance, leadership and soft skills, Reality Changers recruits 8th through 11th grade students from underrepresented backgrounds and sets them on a path to become first-generation college graduates and agents of change in their communities. Students who achieve at least a 3.5 GPA are eligible for Academic Connections, a three-week summer residential program at University of California, San Diego (UCSD), where they attend STEM classes taught by UCSD faculty and earn college credits.
  • Rocking the Boat, Inc.: Students from the South Bronx, N.Y., work together to build wooden boats, learn to row and sail, and restore local urban waterways, revitalizing their community while creating better lives for themselves. The program helps students develop self-confidence, set goals and gain the skills necessary to achieve them.
  • SIFMA (Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association) Foundation for Investor Education: Through its flagship financial literacy program, The Stock Market Game, SIFMA is working to address declining math test scores and encourage financial education across the state of Massachusetts. Students in fourth through 12th grades receive hypothetical funds to purchase stocks, bonds and mutual funds, while studying current events to assess the impact on the market and their own portfolios.
  • Two-Bit Circus Foundation: Providing support to teachers in the Lynwood Unified School District in California, the Foundation offers virtual STEM and STEAM trainings, kits and other resources to engage students through remote learning. Each project is standards-aligned and designed to teach, inspire and call on students' creativity and critical thinking skills.
  • Urban Teachers: Operating in Baltimore, Washington, D.C. and Dallas, Urban Teachers is a national teacher development program that recruits and prepares effective educators for children in urban schools. This four-year program equips novice educators with the tools and knowledge to empower children through learning and to stay in the teaching profession. A key priority for the organization is preparing Black and Latinx educators who draw on their own backgrounds and experiences to accelerate academic and life outcomes of urban children.
  • Women's Audio Mission: With a mission to change the face of sound by addressing the underrepresentation of women in creative technology careers, Women's Audio Mission's Girls on the Mic program uses music and media to inspire and engage more than 2,500 underserved girls ages 11 to 18 from Title I schools in the San Francisco Bay Area. Afterschool sessions are held five days a week to introduce girls to careers in sound engineering. Students learn critical thinking and problem-solving skills by completing STEM projects like developing and recording podcasts, building small synthesizers and creating interactive music using coding apps.

Since its establishment in 1984, the American Honda Foundation has awarded more than $43 million to organizations serving over 118 million people across the U.S. To learn more about the Foundation's grant application process, visit www.honda.com/community/applying-for-a-grant.

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The Acura MDX Prototype has debuted, showing off the future of the SUV.

Photo courtesy of Acura

The Acura MDX Prototype is here, which means that the next-generation MDX is right around the corner. The newest version of the three-row SUV will arrive at dealership lots in early 2021 with MDX Type S models coming in the summer of 2021. This is the exact same lath the 2021 Acura TLX took for its redesign.

The MDX Prototype features a dramatic exterior with sculpted features and a wide face that takes the design of the TLX and moves it to a SUV model. It looks fresh though perhaps more importantly, it looks premium.

Acura MDX Prototype The Acura MDX Prototype is the first step in the official direction of the fourth-generation MDX.Photo courtesy of Acura

Acura is showing off the concept car in Liquid Carbon and Performance Red exterior colors. The Diamond Pentagon grille is flanked by four-element JewelEye LED headlights that have Chicane LED daytime running lights underneath that are inspired by the Acura ARX-05 race car.

The new SUV serves as the debut of the company's next-generation truck platform. It's the most rigid model to date and comes complete with a double wishbone front suspension. It comes with all-wheel drive (available on the next-gen model) and features Brembo four-piston brake calipers, finished in Ivory paint, at all four corners.

Acura has put its strong and tested 3.5-liter V6 under the hood and paired it with a 10-speed automatic transmission. The forthcoming MDX Type S will have a turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 that produces 355 horsepower and 354 pound-feet of torque.

The SUV's 21-inch wheels highlights the MDX's 3-inch longer wheelbase that allows for a larger and more versatile cargo area and added spaciousness for passengers. The prototype shows off more legroom in all three rows than was in the previous-gen model.

Acura MDX Prototype

Photo courtesy of Acura

Acura sport seats are featured in all three rows and offer 16-way power adjustment and integrated massage functionality with nine massage modes.

The interior of the MDX Prototype features a sophisticated cabin that is mostly duplicative of what you'll find in the TLX. There is open-pore wood that is infused with metallic flake, polished aluminum, and soft-touch Milanno leather. The instrument panel and steering wheel feature two-tone Ebony and Light Orchid leather.

There's an ultra-wide panoramic moonroof. The SUV's LED ambient lighting is available in 27 different schemes tied to driving modes and representative of various locations, such as iconic roads and race circuits around the world.

Like the TLX, the MDX Prototype features Acura's Precision Cockpit. It features a customizable 12.3-inch, high-definition display in front of the driver. The 12.3-innch infotainment display matches in size and is controlled with Acura's touchpad.

Acura's audio system partnership has resulted in the model featuring the ELS Studio 3D premium audio system. It delivers 1000 watts of power and utilizes 25 speakers.

Acura has promised that, as in the prototype, the company's suite of driver assistance and safety technology, AcuraWatch, will be standard.

Stay tuned to see the next-gen MDX soon.

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