Road Trip

Here's how to research the perfect road trip

Make sure you pick the right vehicle. The one shown here is the one millionth Porsche 911 that was produced.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

The United States is opening back up for businesses. You might not want to hop on a plane anytime soon, but you can't kick the feeling that you want to get away. Enter: the road trip.

In a recent interview with Porsche, Stefan Bogner, creative director, Curves magazine, divulged his tips for preparing the perfect road trip as part of the #GetCreativeWithPorsche series. Here are some of Bogner's top tips, paired with insight from the AutomotiveMap team.

Take your time.

It's never too early to start planning, even if you're just looking.

"The most important thing is to take your time," said Bogner. "If you were planning a month-long holiday, you'd take a long time getting it all just right. It's the same with a road trip: preparation is key."

Use a variety of sources to gather information.

Porsche maps display office research

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Don't just rely on sites like TripAdvisor. Hotels.com, or Yelp to shape your itinerary. Use them as a starting point. Ask your friends and family for recommendations. Read blogs, check out the visitors and convention bureau website, and browse local publications for insights on local flavor.

Brush up on how to read a map.

"I am old-school and I love to study paper maps and guide books," shared Bogner. "Get to grips with reading a map and you'll get a better sense of place and perspective."

If you're someone who gets lost even when looking at the "downtown area" handout hotels give out, perhaps it's time to invest a few hours in honing your skills.

Don't forget to check the weather.

Check out predicted weather when you begin planning and keep an eye on it in the weeks and days leading up to the trip. If you've had a particularly wet spell, some roads may not be passable, nature preserves may be closed, and low-lying areas may be impassible. Consider getting a professional-grade weather app for your phone.

If your road trip includes going off-road (or even on the road less traveled), learn to read basic topographic maps.

Porsche maps

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Bogner explains: "Look for the green roads, as these are the scenic ones, and pay attention to the contour lines to get an idea of the topography. When you really study a physical map, the brain starts to absorb the information and when you come to drive a route, you'll know much better where you are."

Timing is everything.

"My one timing rule is to avoid school holidays," said Bogner in the interview. "I never go anywhere in July and August. Don't be afraid to ask the locals the best time of year to visit their area, as no one will know the answer better than them. I was once planning a trip to Scotland and thought the summer would be the perfect time to go but a friend advised me to wait until October. I had the most amazing two weeks of sunshine with no rain. In Scotland!"

Time of day is important too. Try for a mid-week visit to a popular museum, late afternoon visit to a park, a morning walk along the waterway to watch the sunrise. Don't be afraid to contact an attraction and ask when their least busy times are and find out when school groups tend to arrive.

Plan for hours and miles.

Bogner says it best, "Have a rough idea of how far you want to drive each day but make sure you give yourself time to enjoy the trip, rather than running a tight schedule and insisting on being in a certain place by a precise time. Savour the scenery and enjoy the driving. If you take your time and you're open to conversations when you fill up with fuel you'll meet interesting people along the way."

Use social media to find out what to expect.

Want to visit a museum or park? Don't just look at the sanitized version that their PR team puts out on social media. Many social media platforms allow users to tag themselves as being at a location. Click on those tags and find out more about what you can expect.

See if a driving tour is offered.

Porsche 911 Maria, Texas

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Many localities offer a driving tour of their local attractions, countryside, etc. Want to discover local agriculture? Plan a wine tasting spree? See a series of historical sites? Just want to go for a drive? There is probably a map for that. Local motorcycle enthusiasts often chart their drives on MotorcycleRoads.com, which can be used as a resource as well.

Ask for recommendations once you arrive.

​"Local contacts can also suggest their favorite museums (I have discovered some amazing private air museums in America this way) and restaurants," Bogner said. "I am a real foodie so I enjoy researching amazing places to eat."

Be sure to ask locals for restaurant recommendations, and not just he concierge staff at the hotel. When you ask, find out what dishes they recommend. If you do stay in a hotel with a concierge, ask them if there anything you need to know when making a reservation. Sometimes, they have line-skipping tricks up their sleeve.

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This rare 1976 Porsche 911 2.7 S Targa is one of the models headed to across the block.

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

Silverstone Classic Live Online Auction will put 35 Porsches up for sale July 31 through August 2, 2020. The collection of hand-picked Germans features a host of extremely rare and low mileage vehicles. Four stand out from the rest.

"The Stuttgart Collection is quite an amazing group of Porsches. Some have extraordinarily low mileage and others are the best examples of that particular model and there are two highly desirable and rare UK supplied C16 993 Turbo S of the 26 made," said Nick Whale, Silverstone Auctions Managing Director. "For any Porsche aficionado, this is a collection that provides a superb opportunity to acquire one of the best- selected Porsches."

1976 Porsche 911 2.7 S Targa

As seen above, the 1976 Porsche 911 2.7 S Targa has just 562 miles on its odometer from new. Described by the auction house as a "time warp" the car is currently unregistered and comes with the NOVA Certificate and a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity.

The 911 had been redesigned in 1974 for the first time. This generational change included a raised bumper design, which was the direct result of an increase in U.S. safety regulations.

1996 Porsche 911 (993) Turbo

1996 Porsche 911 (993) Turbo

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

This 1996 Porsche 911 (993) Turbo is featured in a triple yellow. It has 745 miles on the odometer from new. The C25 was one of the fastest cars of its time. It could get from zero to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds. The 993 generation was the first time that Porsche install all-wheel drive in the 911 and marks the first time Porsche equipped a model with a twin-turbocharged engine.

1963 Porsche 358B T6 Super 90

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The very rare 1963 Porsche 356B T6 Super 90 was supplied new by AFN in London. It has undergone a complete ground up restoration with the aim of returning the model to its original specification of Slate Grey with red leatherette interior. The engine was rebuilt and tuned by Porsche specialists Andy Prill.

According to Silverstone Auctions, "In 1989 this 356 was granted FIA Competition Papers and used on road rally events including Le Rallye de Monte-Carlo Historique three times in the 1990s. The extensive history file has pictures of the car on the rally, the original green and brown buff log books, old FIA papers and Porsche's Certificate of Authenticity."

The auction house says that a matching numbers 1963 356B T6 Super 90 is an "extremely rare and collectable car". At the time of consignment, this model was the only right-hand drive version on the market.

1998 Porsche 911 (993) Turbo S

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The Turbo S was introduced by Porsche in 1997. This 1998 model is one of 345 built by Porsche's Exclusive Department. According to Silverstone Auctions, " The Turbo S was the last of the air-cooled Porsches and 26 cars were supplied to the UK in right-drive cars. This is one of two 1998 911 (993) Turbos S' being offered in this auction."

A full list of cars in The Stuttgart Collection is listed below, with details on each car on the Silverstone Auctions website:

  • 1997 Porsche 911 (993) C2 Targa
  • 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera
  • 1997 Porsche 911 (993) C4 Coupe
  • 1973 Porsche 2.4 S Coupe
  • 2000 Porsche 911 (996) GT3
  • 1998 Porsche 911 (993) Turbo S
  • 1986 Porsche 911 (930) Turbo 'Flachbau'
  • 1998 Porsche 911 (993) Turbo S
  • 1989 Porsche 911 (930) Turbo LE
  • 1991 Porsche 944 S2 Cabriolet
  • 1995 Porsche 911 (993) RS
  • 1986 Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera
  • 1988 Porsche 924 S
  • 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe
  • 1963 Porsche 356B T6 Super 90
  • 2002 Porsche 911 (996) GT2
  • 2007 Porsche 911 (997) GT3 RS
  • 2003 Porsche 911 (996) Carrera 2 Tiptronic S
  • 1967 (1968 M/Y) Porsche 2.0 S Coupe
  • 1991 Porsche 911 (964) Carrera RS
  • 1976 Porsche 911 2.7 S Targa
  • 1988 Porsche 911 (930) Turbo Cabriolet
  • 1996 Porsche 911 (993) Turbo
  • 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa Super Sport
  • 2014 Porsche 911 (991) 50th Anniversary Edition
  • 2005 Porsche 911 (996) Turbo S - Manual
  • 1955 Porsche Chamonix 550 Spyder
  • 2011 Porsche 911 (997) GTS - Manual
  • 1993 Porsche 968 Club Sport
  • 1989 Porsche 911 Speedster 3.2 Turbo Body
  • 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo
  • 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa Sport
  • 1995 Porsche 928 GTS Auto
  • 1987 Porsche 924 S
  • 2010 Porsche 911 (997) Turbo S

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Porsche's new custom chronograph takes its design cues from the 911.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Personalization continues to grow in popularity, not just as an offering by automakers for the vehicles, but for the lifestyle arms of their business. Porsche is no exception. Beginning July 1, Porsche Design will offer customers in Germany the opportunity to design a custom chronograph. In September, the offering will begin expanding to Great Britain and the U.S.

"There is great global demand for custom personalisation from the factory. Around 90 percent of all 911 models are personalised for customers using equipment from Exclusive Manufaktur. Twenty-five percent of all vehicles delivered around the world from this product line pass through the Exclusive Manufaktur workshop, in which special customer wishes are also brought to life," says Alexander Fabig, Head of Personalization and Classic.

Porsche Design custom chronograph

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

"The cooperation with Porsche Design has been successful over the course of many years. From the 911 Turbo S Exclusive Series through to the current 911 Targa 4S Heritage Design Edition, seven limited-edition Porsche Design timepieces matching the individual vehicles have already been offered."

"With the innovative 'Porsche Design custom-built timepieces' concept, we are now offering customers the possibility of designing a timepiece to match their individual Porsche," adds Jan Becker, CEO Porsche Design Group. "No other timepiece brand or automotive manufacturer currently offers such a personalized and exclusive timepiece concept."

Each custom timepiece is manufacturer in the company's own workshop in Switzerland. Numerous visual and technical personalization elements are offered including the opportunity to choose the color of the case and dial; material of the wrist strap; and the design and color of the automatic movement rotor.

Porsche Design custom chronograph There are 1.5 million customization options available.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

The case of each chronograph is titanium. Customers can choose between a glass bead-blasted or PVD titanium carbide-coated black case. The dial falls into line with the design of the 911, and is reminiscent of the cars' instrument cluster and rev counter. The wrist strap options include the choice of a titanium strap with black or titanium-coloured surface and a leather strap, whose material and color options are based on the interior and exterior of the 911. The leather strap can be finished with contrast stitching using genuine Porsche vehicle thread.

There are 1.5 million possible combinations.

The timepiece features the Porsche Design WERK 01.100, a chronograph movement with chronometer certification that was developed in-house. The timepiece winds itself automatically while worn.

A message, name, or the chassis number of the owner's vehicle can be engraved on the bottom of the timepiece

Porsche Design custom chronograph The leather is stitched using the same Porsche thread that is inside the 911.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Customers can build their model using the web-based Porsche Design Timepieces Configurator or design and order their chronograph as part of the vehicle consulting process in participating Porsche Centres (or with the experts at Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur in Zuffenhausen).

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