Geneva Motor Show 2021

2021 Geneva International Motor Show cancelled, event to be sold

Exhibitors have to dismantle their displays after cancellation of the Geneva International Motor Show on February 28, 2020 in Geneva, Switzerland. Swiss authorities announced today that all upcoming events with more than 1,000 attendees will be cancelled in an attempt to prevent further spread of the coronavirus.

Photo by Robert Hradil/Getty Images

After polling their members, the organizing body of the Geneva International Motor Show has decided to not move forward with the 2021 event.

This is a direct result of the financial constraints put upon the group following the cancellation of the 2020 show after Switzerland's government announced a ban on gatherings of 1,000 people or more as the coronavirus ramped up a week before the show was to begin. The cancellation of the 2020 event is estimated to have cost 11 million Swiss francs.

Geneva International Motor showAs a result of the closure of the Geneva International Motor Show, the organization that runs the show suffered an enormous financial loss. Photo by Robert Hradil/Getty Images

Though the Foundation that puts one the show was approved for a loan of 16.8 million Swiss francs to help offset the impact, the organization did not feel that it would be responsible to use the loan due to the uncertainty that the loan would guarantee long-term stability for the event.

Conditions of the loan included repayment of 1 million Swiss francs before the event could possibly have made any money as well as the requirement that a show be put on in 2021.

When the Committee and Foundation Board polled exhibitors, they asked them about participating in a 2021 event. Most said that they would probably not participate in a 2021 edition, but were likely to do so in 2022.

In addition to the economic toll of the event, the orgainzing committee was wary of planning for an event that normally attracts 600,000 visitors and 10,000 journalists with the status of the ongoing world health crisis still uncertain, including related travel bans.

The future of the show remains relatively uncertain though the Federal Council approved a plan to sell the rights to put on the show and all assets to Palexpo SA. Palexpo is the convention center where the event is typically held.

GIMS is the largest public event in Switzerland. Its economic impact on the canton of Geneva is estimated at some CHF 200 million per year.

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New subcompact crossover

Honda announces freshened HR-V for 2023

The new HR-V is based on the Civic.

Honda

With the release of the all-new Civic and its performance variants, Honda's lineup grew more exciting this year. Even so, the automaker can't forget about its bread and butter models, which in the United States means SUVs. Its smallest, the HR-V, is getting an overhaul for 2023 with fresh styling and a more responsive powertrain. Honda hasn't elaborated on pricing or given out an exact release date for the HR-V, but we know the SUV is coming this summer.

2023 Honda HR-VThe new HR-V gets fresh styling and a more responsive powertrain.Honda

The 2023 HR-V gets a new grille with a longer hood and sweeping roofline. Honda notes that the new HR-V is based on the Civic, so while we don't have full powertrain and tech details for the new SUV, we can draw some inferences from that information. The new Civic comes standard with a 158-horsepower four-cylinder engine and a CVT, which would be a reasonable choice for the HR-V. As it did in the Civic, the base will likely also bring a lively driving experience and confident handling to the HR-V.

2023 Honda HR-VThe HR-V will hit the streets this summer.Honda

Honda says the HR-V features a large greenhouse with door-mounted mirrors and a low cowl for better visibility. LED headlights and tail lights are standard, and the new rear-end design features a more rounded, grown-up shape than the previous model.

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What was your best car-related experience this year?

Chris Teague

This year has been a lot of things, but it hasn't been boring. Even if we focus only on the car world, there's plenty to talk about, from microchip-related new vehicle shortages to the wave of new electric vehicles hitting the market. That leaves us with a question for all of you: What was the best or most memorable car moment for you in 2021? I'll get the conversation started.

Porsche Cayenne GTSMy SoCal Cayenne śaw snow for the first time in its nearly 200k-mile life last week.Chris Teague

I'd spent a good portion of 2021 wanting a new-old car to drive when I wasn't testing a new vehicle. That's harder than you'd think for someone who thinks, talks, and writes about cars all day, because there are so many interesting, risky, and downright funky options out there in every price range. The added headache for me was that I'd chosen to shop for a "fun" car in one of the most volatile car markets ever seen. Even the extremely high-mileage "untouchable" European cars I wanted to buy were commanding ridiculous prices.

After a solid few months of waffling between various rattletrap Mercedes-AMG, BMW M, and Audi S/RS cars, I landed on an option that had escaped me before: The Porsche Cayenne. First-generation Cayennes are a real bargain now, but the 955/957 (Porsche's internal code for the SUVs) can experience major problems that occur with or without regular maintenance and care. I was determined to buy one, and wasn't overly concerned about mileage, as long as I could count the number of owners on one hand. There was a beautiful 2009 Cayenne GTS with 90,000 miles but nine owners, a gorgeous 2004 Cayenne Turbo with a concerning engine tick, and many more just like them. Finally, I decided to risky-click a 196,000-mile Cayenne GTS in Southern California. It had one owner and one dealer-owner for a month or two prior to sale, its condition looked decent in photos, and I was able to negotiate a reasonable enough price that shipping it from San Diego to Maine wasn't a huge problem.

Porsche Cayenne GTSThe pics look great, but hands-on tells another story.Chris Teague

I had two traveling Euro mechanics check the car out, and both confirmed that it was well-worn but mechanically sound, so I jumped. Ten days later, on a snowy, icy, dark Maine afternoon, the Cayenne arrived. Cosmetically, there were a few things the dealer and mechanics failed to mention, but overall, it looked good. The SUV passed Maine safety and emissions testing without problem, got a new set of Michelins, and I was on my way.

Porsche Cayenne GTSI'm in danger, but thankfully this should be a reasonable fix.Chris Teague

A few days of driving revealed what I was really in for. A check engine light revealed a camshaft position sensor error and the Cayenne displayed a nasty vibration at idle. A new sensor and motor mounts, and I'm on my way. I'll update you as more things break or miraculously work, but I want to hear your memories from 2021.

Email me at chris@automotivemap.com, and I will compile the best and most interesting stories for a story on New Year's Day. May you all have a wonderful 2022.

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