Tires

Pollution from tires can be 1,000 times worse car exhaust according to Emissions Analytics

When tires come into contact with the road surface, they release pollutants.

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Emissions Analytics, an independent global testing and data company that studies real-world emissions and fuel efficiency for passenger and commercial vehicles, has found that pollution and tire wear can be 1,000 times worse than what comes out of a vehicle's exhaust pipe.

Unlike exhaust pollution, tire and brake pollution is mostly unregulated. These other types of pollutants from a vehicle are referred to as non-exhaust emissions (NEE). According to Emissions Analytics, NEEs are currently defined as "particles released into the air from brake wear, tyre wear, road surface wear and resuspension of road dust during on-road vehicle usage."

Emissions Analytics says that NEEs are believed to constitute the majority of primary particulate matter from road transport. The 2019 report "Non-Exhaust Emissions from Road Traffic" by the United Kingdom Government's Air Quality Expert Group recommended that NEEs be recognized as a major source of pollution.

To determine what the effect of NEEs are on the environment, Emission Analytics conducted initial tire wear testing. They used a hatchback running on new, properly inflated tires and found that the car emitted 5.8 grams per kilometer of particles.

Current exhaust emission limits in the U.K. are 4.5 milligrams per kilometer. That means that the team found that NEEs pollute the environment 1,000 times more than the maximum allowable exhaust amount.

Emissions Analytics noted, along with the results, that this number could be even higher if the vehicle's tires were under inflated or if the road surfaces were rougher.

Richard Lofthouse, Senior Researcher at Emissions Analytics expressed concern regarding the findings, "It's time to consider not just what comes out of a car's exhaust pipe but particle pollution from tyre and brake wear. Our initial tests reveal that there can be a shocking amount of particle pollution from tires – 1,000 times worse than emissions from a car's exhaust. What is even more frightening is that while exhaust emissions have been tightly regulated for many years, tyre wear is totally unregulated – and with the increasing growth in sales of heavier SUVs and battery-powered electric cars, non-exhaust emissions are a very serious problem."

There are ways to reduce the effect of NEEs coming from your vehicle, including making sure that your tires are properly inflated, and reduce the weight of your vehicle as much as possible (don't carry around excess weight).

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The Nissan Rogue has been completely redesigned for the 2021 model year.

Photo courtesy of Nissan Motor America

It's easy to glance across the compact SUV landscape and characterize them all as being perfect for soccer moms. In the field, however, there are few that actually blend together. All have highs and lows as part of the design process that is their company's plan to stand out.

The 2021 Nissan Rogue is no exception to that rule. It was fully redesigned for the 2021 model year, bringing updated looks, an upgraded interior, and more powerful engine to the table. That's not all. The Rogue has stepped out of the bubble-body bubble. Though it still has typical SUV proportions, its nose is beefier and more muted while its backside stands taller and flatter.

2021 Nissan Rogue Nissan offers the Rogue with a two-tone paint scheme.Photo courtesy of Nissan Motor America

Under the hood is a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine that is paired with a continuously variable transmission and neither the most fuel efficient nor the most energetic power plant available in a compact SUV. What it is, is capable. There are few times in the Rogue's lifespan where the average buyer is likely to take advantage of the full 181 horsepower and 181 pound-feet of torque and think, "You know, I wish this thing was quicker."

Drivers have their choice of Off-Road, Standard, Eco, and Sport drive modes when behind the wheel of an all-wheel drive variant of the SUV. Sport genuinely kicks the experience up a notch and gives the crossover a little more asphalt-eating enthusiasm.

Like the previous-generation Rogue, this one goes right where you want it. The steering is properly weighted and effortless. Parking in a typical store lot is a breeze, as is maneuvering it around traffic.

There's a new-to-Nissan shifter in the Rogue that takes up far less room than the previous generation's did and offers quick and easy maneuverability with accuracy, which is about all you can hope for from a modern shifter yet so many automakers get it so wrong (hello, rotary dial).

2021 Nissan Rogue The shifter in the Rogue is new for 2021.Photo courtesy of Nissan Motor America

A crossover is more about functionality than looks and the Rogue has that covered. From the standard multi-level LED headlights to the wide opening doors (easy in-out for little ones, car seats, and groceries), a split one-touch fold-down rear seat with remote capability, easy-to-wash cargo liner, and Divide-n-Hide divided rear cargo storage system.

It's also about keeping people safe. The Rogue works to do that with its standard Nissan Safety Shield 360 suite of safety technology that includes automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, blind spot warning, rear cross traffic alert, lane departure warning, high beam assist, and rear automatic braking.

The company's ProPilot Assist driver assist technology is available and performs just as well as it did on the previous generation Rogue. Though its functionality has become more commonplace on vehicles in years since its debut, the system remains one of the better ones on the market and it truly makes driving long distances a heck of a lot easier on the brain.

2021 Nissan Rogue Nissan has improved the car's digital footprint with a large infotainment screen, all-digital driver information display, and a head-up display.Photo courtesy of Nissan Motor America

For 2021, the system is available with Navi-Link, a navigation-based component that uses real-time data to help predict traffic ahead and route accordingly. Additionally, the system makes adjustments to allow the driver to remain at ease in changing situations including Speed Limit Assist, and extended auto restart timing.

That technology pairs with the creature comforts that abound in the Rogue. Its seats are of the famously comfortable NASA-inspired Zero Gravity variety. Rear seat passengers can enjoy a recline function as well as available tri-zone climate control. Pull-up sunshades are also available for the second-row windows.

Its cabin is far more premium than what you'll find in the Toyota RAV4 or Ford Escape at an trim level, and is most comparable to the Mazda CX-5. Though clearly built to withstand the daily rigors of family life, the Rogue's cabin isn't overpowered by materials built for hardiness rather than aesthetics.

The SUV's new all-digital 12.3-inch driver information screen is easy to read and appealing. The same goes for the full-color 10.8-inch head-up display and 9-inch infotainment touch screen. Nissan has brought back its helpful surround view monitor for this generation.

2021 Nissan Rogue Nissan has reconfigured the SUV's cargo area for 2021.Photo courtesy of Nissan Motor America

Other technology amenities include wireless Apple CarPlay, wireless phone charging, USB-A and USB-C charging ports, Google Maps, and Waze.

The 2021 Nissan Rogue doesn't reinvent the wheel. It keeps doing what the Rogue has always done – offer family-friendly functionality that is hard to beat in its class. For that reason, it deserves to be on your test drive list.

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V2V communication allows vehicles to connect to each other.

Photo courtesy of Volvo Car USA

You might not have gotten in an accident if you know the road ahead of you was covered with ice. You may have known that the road was covered with ice if that digital sign you pass on the highway had a message announcing slippery conditions ahead.

A new partnership between Volvo and Waycare Technologies will enable data from Volvo's Hazard Light Alert and Slippery Road Alert to be anonymously shared with transportation municipalities and Waze.

Starting with 2021 model year vehicles, Hazard Light Alert and Slippery Road Alert will allow certain Volvo cars to communicate with each other. The models will be able to automatically alert other Volvo drivers via a cloud-based network when the vehicle's hazard lights are turned on or low friction is detected, and the system is properly connected to the internet.

Volvo Waycare Technologies Waze safety communication Information sharing between cars can give a driver more knowledge about the unknowns of the roadway ahead.Photo courtesy of Volvo Car USA

This isn't the first time the system has been implemented. It was introduced in 2016 on 90 Series cars in Sweden and Norway.

Hazard Light Alert and Slippery Road Alert now come as standard equipment on all model year 2021 Volvo cars sold in the U.S. Owners will be able to choose to activate the features via the car's infotainment screen and can opt-out/deactivate them at any time.

In addition to road conditions, the Daycare partnership allows Volvos to share data with other sources including city infrastructure, telematics, and weather forecasts.

Behind the scenes, Waycare will then use artificial intelligence to synthesize the data and provide operational insights local U.S. transportation industries (think: New York State Thruway Authority, your local public works department, and the Michigan State Police). Using the information, agencies can choose to push notifications to drivers using the 5-1-1 system, social media, or a series of road sign alerts.

"Sharing real-time safety data between cars can help avoid accidents," said Malin Ekholm, head of Volvo Cars Safety Center. "Volvo owners directly contribute to making roads safer for other drivers that enable the feature, while they also benefit from early warnings to potentially dangerous conditions ahead."

Connected safety data-sharing between Volvo cars is available throughout the U.S. Connected safety data sharing with Waycare and its partners is currently available at locations where Waycare has their traffic Management Platform including Nevada, Central Ohio, Missouri, Texas, North Carolina, Utah, San Francisco/Bay Area, and western Florida. Waycare has plans to expand to other areas in the future.

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