Road Trip

Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid is an ideal road trip warrior, especially for National Parks travel

Author Nicole Wakelin tried out the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid during a long haul trip across Wyoming and South Dakota visiting many of America's National Parks.

Photo by Nicole Wakelin

Today's roads are populated by legions of SUVs and crossovers, many filled with busy families. They're a good choice when you have lots of passengers, but don't discount the perks of driving a minivan like the Chrysler Pacifica. Sure, it's not especially cool, but when it comes to functionality, it's hard to beat.

The Pacifica makes managing day-to-day life easy, but it also shines on a road trip. Whether you're packing up the kids or it's simply a couple's getaway, this minivan is loaded with features to make the trip relaxing and fun.

On the kid front, there's a rear-seat entertainment system with wireless headphones and two 10-inch touchscreens in the seatbacks. The second and third row Stow 'n Go seats fold down into the floor when not in use or that same space becomes hidden underfloor storage. It's the perfect place to pack extra snacks, drinks, or an emergency change of clothes.

2019 Chrysler Pacifica The Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid's all-electric drive mode is helpful for sneaking up on wildlife at the National Parks.Photo by Nicole Wakelin

Even if there aren't kids in the mix, it turns out the Chrysler Pacifica is a great choice for a couple's getaway. Equipped with optional captain's chairs in the second row, the space in the middle is an ideal spot for a cooler. It's easily reachable for the front passenger so a cold drink and a snack are always at the ready.

There's also an ample amount of storage with 32.3 cubic feet behind the third row, 87.5 cubic feet behind the second row, and 140.5 cubic feet behind the first row. Even with a full load of passengers, the Pacifica provides plenty of room for your luggage. Leave the kids at home and all that cargo space makes picking up those quirky roadside finds a breeze.

The Chrysler Pacifica gets good fuel economy with an EPA-estimated 19 mpg in the city, 28 mpg on the highway, and 22 mpg combined with the gas engine. There's also the Pacifica Hybrid, which is the only hybrid minivan on the market. It gets an EPA-estimated 82 MPGe making it a fuel economy champion.

The Pacifica Hybrid has an all-electric range of 30 miles with regenerative braking that extends that range. Road trips that wander through more mountainous terrain will see that electric range go up with heavy brake use in downhill stretches.

A hybrid running in electric mode is quiet. Not only does it make the interior quiet for passengers, it reduces noise outside the vehicle, too. Those planning a drive where watching wildlife is a part of the adventure will find the Pacifica Hybrid less likely to startle roadside wildlife leaving the kids with a close-up look at creatures that might be spooked by a gas engine.

The Chrysler Pacifica is a versatile minivan with room for the family and all their stuff. Its comfortable and spacious interior lets everyone relax and good fuel economy, especially in the hybrid, make it easy on the family budget. Pricing for the 2020 Chrysler Pacifica starts at $33,495.

Grand touring isn't dead. It's just different than it used to be.

Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Cruising up the coast of California in a Ford Mustang. Taking an RV full of family on a trip to explore the American West. Leaf peeping in New England while hopping from bed and breakfast to bed and breakfast in your family sedan. These are classic examples of U.S. road trips that do not feature a grand touring car.

Is the dream of grand touring dead? The advent of the EV and the popularity of the minivan and SUVs have not killed it. In fact, they've revolutionized it.

No longer do you have to cram six people into a sedan with your brother standing up between mom and dad in the front. You can tour in comfort in a modern SUV and still have as authentic an experience as you did in your childhood, perhaps better.

Autocamp Yosemite pond Airstream Autocamp Yosemite is a unique and luxurious way to "camp" near Yosemite.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Buckled into a thoroughly modern Honda Passport, this grand touring trip set off from Autocamp Yosemite, a resort made entirely of Airstream trailers, tiny houses, and small cabins, just as the sun was starting to shine the first light of morning. Headed seats, accurate navigation, and right-sized cup holders gave the beginning of the trip an optimistic note.

On the winding roads of CA 140, the Passport was relatively efficient and stuck to the road much better than the Honda Pilot would have. The sun continued to rise and touch the tree tops as the route wound its way over and around the Merced River.

2019 Honda Passport The Honda Passport is smaller than a Honda Pilot and bigger than a Honda CR-V.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Making it into the park before the sun has fully risen is not only a treat but a necessity if you want to beat the hoards of tourists that flock to the park's most famous sites, pushing into your space with their selfie sticks, cigarette smoke, and overstuffed backpacks.

Tunnel View Yosemite morning Tunnel View is one of the can't-miss spots in Yosemite National Park.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Start by winding your way up Wawona Road to the start of the Artist Point Trail and Tunnel View with an observation deck that requires no hiking to get to and a view that you've likely seen countless times before in pictures. El Capitan rises on one side as Cathedral Rocks grace the other. It's impossible to fathom exactly how big they are from the viewpoint, but no one leaves the spot unimpressed.

Continuing to head up the mountain, the Passport's V6 had no problem passing 5,000 and 8,000 feet as the SUV rose out of the famed Yosemite Tunnel. The turn up Glacier Point Road had the SUV pointing for, you guessed it, Glacier Point. Getting there early meant not being stuck behind busses and being able to easily cruise uphill while stopping for a bit of hiking and observation along the way. Pulling off for a walk on the Mono Meadow Trail is a must, but watch out for bears.

Mono Meadow trailhead 2019 Honda Passport Park at the tailhead at Mono Meadow for a scenic hike.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Back from the hike, the journey up the road continued to Washburn Point, where the Passport braved the crowded parking area, easily maneuvering into a tight spot near the far curb, setting up its occupants for a short walk to a viewing platform to see awe-inspiring views of the Clark Range and Sierra Crest rising up from the treetops, Illilouette Falls flowing, and the profile of Half Dome. It's one of the better selfie-taking spots in the park because of the angles of the scenery.

Yosemite National Park Washburn Point view Washburn Point provides a different view of Half Dome an surrounding hillsides. Be sure to visit in the morning before the parking spots get swallowed up by tourists.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Continuing further up Glacier Point road, easily passing 9,000 feet of elevation, the road ends at the Glacier Point parking area where the peanut-bladdered find relief in the numerous restrooms available. Parking is easier further down the row you travel. Spaces are narrow so making full use of the Passport's on-board camera system to ensure proper space sitting was wholly appropriate.

Glacier Point crowd Yosemite National Park Getting up to Glacier Point early in the day should be a priority for adventure seekers who don't want to deal with heavy crowds.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

From there, it's a short and slightly uphill handicap-accessible walk to the most spectacular view that Yosemite offers. Standing before the visitor on the observation deck are Half Dome and three waterfalls. The Yosemite Valley floor is carpeted with thick trees that mask the ant-sized cars winding their way to Yosemite Village. Space is limited and tourists are generally pushy, but be sure to leave time to have a moment to put down your phone or camera (or both) and just stand and take it all in. (And maybe thank Teddy Roosevelt and John Muir for ensuring that it is still around.)

Glacier Point Yosemite National Park guide key sign The National Park Service has installed these helpful signs to show visitors what they're seeing. The space around them is often crowded so take a quick picture then move and use the image on your phone to help you navigate.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Before you leave, use the restroom again. There are several, often overlooked options available so check for the shortest line.

The trip back down Glacier Point Road to the Yosemite Valley isn't nearly as long as it seems when driving the other direction. By now, it's likely near lunchtime, but before heading to The Ahwahnee for lunch, stop on the way back down near Bridalveil Falls where roadside parking is generally easy to find and the views are, once again, spectacular.

The Ahwahnee's dining room isn't as fancy during the day as it is during the night. This gives parents dressed in hiking clothes the opportunity to sit and dine in the historic hotel without the obligation of staying at the hotel and wearing a dinner jacket.

The Ahwahnee dining room Yosemite National Park The historical Ahwanee dining room is a must-stop. It has tasty cuisine at prices that aren't outrageous.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Continuing after lunch, the rest of the day relies more on your patience and the time limits of daylight rather than the availability of sights to be seen. Skip the urge to circle for a parking space near the Visitors Center and instead cruise for an hour along Big Oak Flat Road and head east on Tioga Road. When touring with little ones, this gives them an opportunity to take a 45-minute or so nap that can be used to your advantage later in the day.

Pull-off points with unique views are abundant along this road the further you travel. Don't forget your camera and perhaps think about leaving the heated seats on if you're hopping in and out of the car in the cooler months (read: not June or July but most other times of the year).

Olmstead Point Half Dome Olmstead Point is on the other side of the park from Yosemite Valley and worth the trip. Here, Half Dome is in the distance.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

If your shoes have sufficient grip and you're still feeling up for some hiking, don't miss a stop at Olmstead Point where the terrain looks nothing like what you'll see in other parts of the park but the view shows off the back side of the terrain you saw earlier in the day from Washburn Point. Proceeding down the road, the stone encroaches and it's easy to think of what the terrain must be like on the moon.

Venture even further east to Tenaya Lake, a peaceful respite that provides the opportunity to sit and marvel at calm true-blue water away from mobs of tourists. That's also a good turnaround point, where you can head back to the Valley to take advantage of the waning afternoon crowds to see some of Yosemite's most popular features including the El Capitan Meadow, Valley View, Yosemite Chapel, and Yosemite Falls.

Tenaya Lake Yosemite National Park Tenaya Lake is a peaceful respite away from the hustle and bustle of Yosemite's more popular attractions.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

While a stop at the Yosemite Visitors Center provides some historical context for your visit, if you're looking for souvenirs, the best place to go is the Village Store.

Souvenirs in hand, it was now nearly dark on the Valley floor, and it was time for these travelers to point the Passport back to AutoCamp. The two-row SUV had served as a trusty steed - reliable, comfortable, and easily maneuverable. Those aren't the characteristics that shoppers frequently look for, but it's something that they remember when it comes time to get their next vehicle. Though not a traditional grand tourer, the Passport provided a grand level of touring capability.

Thule's accessories fit Hyundai's entire line of SUVs and crossovers.

Photo courtesy of Hyundai

Beginning today, Thule accessories are available for sale at participating Hyundai dealerships across the U.S.

Included as part of the available lineup are bike racks, roof racks, winter and water sports racks, cargo carriers, and basket accessories. The selection is curated from the entire Thule catalogue.

2019 Hyundai Kona Thule accessoris roof rack Thule accessories are made for beach-goers and mountain-seekers.Photo courtesy of Hyundai

"This partnership with Thule proves to be great timing as we simultaneously grow our line of SUVs, including newcomers such as the Hyundai Palisade and Hyundai Venue," said Mike O'Brien, vice president of Product, Corporate and Digital Planning for Hyundai Motor America. "Whether you go camping every weekend or need some extra space for your kid's soccer gear, Thule and Hyundai are making it simpler than ever for you to maximize your lifestyle with this new accessory partnership. Thule is the leader in this space and their lifetime warranty is a good match to our brand aspirations."

Hyundai has grown its lineup to include the hot-selling subcompact Kona SUV, new Hyundai Venue, and three-row Palisade SUV in the last 18 months. Last week the company announced plans to expand its portfolio even more in the coming years by adding 13 new products, including the Hyundai Santa Cruz utility vehicle.

Hyundai has also recently begun targeted advertising for adventure seekers, specifically with its Palisade campaign, which champions road tripping.

2019 Hyundai Kona Thule accessoris roof rack Thule's accesses are designed to help surfers, swimmers, and snowboarders (and everyone in between).Photo courtesy of Hyundai

"We are thrilled about our new partnership with Hyundai this year," said Tom Chimenti, director of original equipment sales, North America for Thule Group. "Our industry leading rack products are a perfect match for Hyundai's expanding line, and Thule's award winning offering of solutions to help transport your gear, regardless of activity, will be a great addition for any Hyundai owner looking to live an active lifestyle."

In addition to the products available at Hyundai dealerships, Thule designs and manufactures luggage, computer and camera bags, sports bags and backpacks, and child-related products such as baby joggers, child bike seats and bike trailers. The products are sold in more than 140 countries worldwide.