Engineering

The world's fastest reacting suspension system is getting even faster

The 2020 CT5-V features unique chassis, suspension and driving technology calibrations for an elevated road performance.

Photo courtesy of Cadillac

The fourth generation of General Motors' Magnetic Ride Control debuted on the 2020 Cadillac CT4-V and CT5-V, and is expanding to the 2021 CT5 Sport and Escalade, offering up to 45-percent faster damping response. The system was first introduced 20 years ago in the 2002 Cadillac Seville STS.

In addition to the faster response time, changers to the system include all-new wheel accelerometers, improved magnetic flux control, and an inertial measurement unit that increases sensitivity to body motion.

2020 Cadillac MagneRide 4.0Magnetic Ride Control uses electromagnets paired with magnetorheological fluid within the shock absorbers to continually vary their damping rate.Photo courtesy of Cadillac

"With MagneRide 4.0, the world's fastest reacting suspension system is now even faster," said Thomas Schinderle, Cadillac vehicle performance engineer. "When paired with our sedans' award-winning rear-wheel-drive architecture, the result is two of the most responsive sport sedans on the market, with reflexes that elevate the already high threshold of the V-Series legacy."

Here's how it works, according to Cadillac:

"Magnetic Ride Control is an active damping system that uses electromagnets paired with magnetorheological fluid within the shock absorbers to continually vary their damping rate. Wheel accelerometers read the road up to 1,000 times per second, triggering changes in the magnetic charge within the fluid that can alter the damping rates of the shocks almost instantly."

MagneRide 4.0 includes redeveloped sensors, controller hardware, dampers, and vehicle tuning methods. Highlights include:

  • New wheel hub accelerometers and an inertial measurement unit transmit and process changes in road conditions four times faster than the previous system, for more fluid and natural-feeling damping changes.
  • The inertial measurement unit provides more precise measurements of body motion, relative to the wheel, for more accurate readings under heavy braking, hard cornering and other driving conditions.
  • New secondary temperature maps enable engineers to compensate for changes in damper fluid temperature, which contributes to more consistent performance, especially during performance driving.
  • New magnetic flux control creates a more consistent and more accurate transition between rebound and compression in the dampers, improving the system's ability to sense and control vehicle body movement.
  • A significant reduction in damper friction produces a near "no damping" effect that enables engineers to tune for more pronounced differences between drive modes.
  • Upgrades to hardware and software improve transient body control to allow the vehicle to remain more level as it transitions between corners.
  • A new magnetorheological fluid formula reduces friction within the damper that contributes to smoother overall damping.

Cadillac's 2021 CT4-V (rear-wheel drive) and CT5-V come standard with MagneRide 4.0 and start at $45,890 and $48,790, respectively. The 2021 CT5 Sport starts at $42,790 and MagneRide 4.0 is available as part of the new optional V Performance package, which also includes additional suspension performance upgrades and a mechanical limited-slip differential.

Cadillac MAgneRide 4.0 Magnetic ride controlPhoto courtesy of Cadillac

For the 2021 Escalade, MagneRide 4.0 is standard on the Sport and Platinum models, which start at $86,890 and $101,290, respectively, and is available on the Premium Luxury trim as part of the optional Performance Package.

All prices include a $995 destination charge.

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Performance luxury SUV

The Cadillac Escalade-V starts at almost $150,000

The Escalade-V gets a $149,990 starting price

Cadillac

Cadillac teased an ultra-powerful Escalade-V a while back, and now we have all the details. The 2023 SUV will feature a supercharged 6.2-liter V8, plenty of luxury, and a stout six-figure price tag.

The 2023 Escalade-V comes with a supercharged 6.2-liter V8 that makes 682 horsepower and 653 pound-feet of torque. It features a hand-built design and shares much of its underlying engineering with the CT5-V Blackwing. It's paired with a ten-speed automatic transmission and full-time active four-wheel drive.

2023 Cadillac Escalade-VUnder the hood, there's a supercharged 6.2-liter V8.Cadillac

Cadillac gives every Escalade-V air ride adaptive suspension and magnetic ride control. The driver can customize the suspension and feel using the SUV's selectable driving modes. The system can also raise or lower the ride height by to .8 inches, and the SUV comes with a launch control system that helps it get off the line with explosive speed.

Inside, the Escalade-V builds on the top trim of the standard SUV with zebra wood accents, massaging front seats, and a heated steering wheel. It's got the same amazing tech, too, with a curved OLED display that runs the length of the dash, navigation, voice commands, wireless Apple Carplay and Android Auto, an augmented reality navigation system, and a 36-speaker AKG Studio stereo. Cadillac Super Cruise is available.

2023 Cadillac Escalade-VAn extended ESV variant is also available. Cadillac

The 2023 Cadillac Escalade-V goes on sale this summer. Starting pricing lands at $149,990, and Cadillac offers an extended-wheelbase ESV version of the high-performance SUV.

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

Front crash preventionwww.youtube.com

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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