In-Car Tech

SiriusXM with 360L coming to 1 million General Motors vehicles

Select General Motors vehicles will come standard with SiriusXM with 360L and the technology is expected to come to many 2021 models.

Photo courtesy of Chevrolet

Starting with 2020 model year vehicles, General Motors will be making SiriusXM with 360L available in 1 million Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, and Cadillac vehicles. The system will integrate into current General Motors infotainment systems.

SiriusXM with 360L gives customers access to more than 200 live SiriusXM channels and the ability to make on-demand programming choices from a library of more than 10,000 hours of SiriusXM content. There are also "For You" recommendations that suggest content to the user.

"Whether on a road trip, dropping off the kids at school or on their daily commute, drivers can get more choice in entertainment with our embedded SiriusXM with 360L experience," said Santiago Chamorro, vice president for Global Connected Services, GM. "By bringing SiriusXM with 360L to nearly 1 million drivers, we are making it easier than ever for our customers to listen to their favorite SiriusXM channels or on-demand content."

Chevrolet, Buick, GMC and Cadillac drivers in the U.S. who have a Remote Access Plan can set up their SiriusXM favorites list through the myChevrolet, myBuick, myGMC or myCadillac mobile apps. They can also manage their SiriusXM subscription through those apps.

A three-month subscription to SiriusXM All Access is included for customers who purchase equipped 2020 model year GM vehicles.

There are 13 model year 2020 models that SiriusXM with 360L will be available on. . A Connected Access plan and a SiriusXM All Access or SiriusXM Select subscription is required to experience the benefits of SiriusXM with 360L.

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Performance luxury SUV

The Cadillac Escalade-V starts at almost $150,000

The Escalade-V gets a $149,990 starting price

Cadillac

Cadillac teased an ultra-powerful Escalade-V a while back, and now we have all the details. The 2023 SUV will feature a supercharged 6.2-liter V8, plenty of luxury, and a stout six-figure price tag.

The 2023 Escalade-V comes with a supercharged 6.2-liter V8 that makes 682 horsepower and 653 pound-feet of torque. It features a hand-built design and shares much of its underlying engineering with the CT5-V Blackwing. It's paired with a ten-speed automatic transmission and full-time active four-wheel drive.

2023 Cadillac Escalade-VUnder the hood, there's a supercharged 6.2-liter V8.Cadillac

Cadillac gives every Escalade-V air ride adaptive suspension and magnetic ride control. The driver can customize the suspension and feel using the SUV's selectable driving modes. The system can also raise or lower the ride height by to .8 inches, and the SUV comes with a launch control system that helps it get off the line with explosive speed.

Inside, the Escalade-V builds on the top trim of the standard SUV with zebra wood accents, massaging front seats, and a heated steering wheel. It's got the same amazing tech, too, with a curved OLED display that runs the length of the dash, navigation, voice commands, wireless Apple Carplay and Android Auto, an augmented reality navigation system, and a 36-speaker AKG Studio stereo. Cadillac Super Cruise is available.

2023 Cadillac Escalade-VAn extended ESV variant is also available. Cadillac

The 2023 Cadillac Escalade-V goes on sale this summer. Starting pricing lands at $149,990, and Cadillac offers an extended-wheelbase ESV version of the high-performance SUV.

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

Front crash preventionwww.youtube.com

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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