Bespoke

This Breadvan Hommage is a one-off V12 GT coupe by Niels van Roij Design

Niels van Roij Design created the Breadvan Hommage from a vintage Ferrari.

Photo courtesy of Niels van Roij Design

It all started with a 1962 Ferrari 250 GT Breadvan. Now it's an Italian design-inspired, V12-powered gran truismo coupe with coach building by Niels van Roij Design.

"We see it as a great privilege that we can celebrate the '62 Breadvan through this Hommage commission," said Niels van Roij. "It was a complex task to translate the essence of the legendary car into a contemporary design. We intended to be inspired by the original, but ensured we were not limited by it in our creativity. The Breadvan Hommage is a new original."

The Niels van Roij Design Breadvan Hommage started as an idea. A sketch by hand. Then, the company moved to fit the design over the technical layout of the base car, refining as they went. This included the bespoke exhaust and unique headlights.

Breadvan Hommage - official video - our one-off V12 coachbuilt car design | Niels van Roij Design www.youtube.com

Renderings were then turned into a clay model. A framework was installed onto the donor car, to which clay was applied. As this occurred, the design was ironed out.

"A car is a complex, three dimensional sculpture, which has to look right from all angles and under different light circumstance," said Roij. "Like sketching, the clay modeling process is iterative and the Breadvan Hommage was reshaped many times, to get it spot on. After establishing the correct proportions the search for sophistication in the surfacing, or skin, started: finding the right subtleties for transitions from one element to another. It includes the exterior graphics like the richly sculpted air vents on the front fenders.'

From there, the body of the car was beaten into shape by a coachbuilder by hand. By the time he was through, only the windscreen of the original vehicle remained as an OEM part.

Moving from the outside to the inside shows off a handmade interior. The outline of the exterior design has been embroidered on to the blue Alcantara carbon fiber-backed seats and there's a monograph on the dials, which have pure silver inlays. All switchgear is made out of milled aluminum, as is the gated shifter. Door panels feature an unpainted, hand beaten aluminum element. A small embroidered Italian flag in the corner of the aluminum insert highlights the design roots of the vehicle.

Niels van Roij Design Breadvan Hommage

Photo courtesy of Niels van Roij Design

The original 60s Breadvan was outfitted with KONI single adjustable shock absorbers. The design team asked KONI to create a modern set of absorbers for the Breadvan Hommage. KONI's engineers used the double adjustable 8211-series as a basis for the parts. This series has been used in Formula 1 for years and the result is a model that is racetrack-ready, just as the original Breadvan was.

Vredestein contributed the tires to the build. Each wheel is wrapped in an Ultrac Vorti+ tire, an ultra-high-performance summer tire.

Trending News

 
 

A prototype of the 2022 GMC Hummer EV undergoes winter weather testing in Michigan.

Photo courtesy of GMC

All vehicles go through extreme weather testing. From the desert sands of the Arabian Peninsula and Mojave Desert to the freezing cold of Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Scandinavia's upper reaches, vehicles from concept to near-production.

During that testing, research and development team members are finding out if their power- and drivetrain components are properly functioning as they have designed them to, checking on calibration, and also discovering the hardiness of their work.

When it comes to electric vehicles, there are additional tests that play into it. Does the battery deplete too quickly? Is the battery able to handle the cold weather? Are the electric motors getting enough power?

GMC HUMMER EV | The Next Chapter youtu.be

It was this, and more, put to the test by General Motors engineers when they got behind the wheel of the 2022 GMC Hummer in the northern reaches of Michigan. While driving in sub-zero temperatures they tested the all-electric truck on various slippery surfaces, including snow, ice, steep and split-mu grades. Key tests include integrating its powerful all-wheel drive torque distribution with the traction control system, as well as calibrating and testing the electronic stability control system.

The video shows the Hummer EV looping a test track, using four-wheel steering to handle ice, and bumping its way over some mild snow piles. There's also a show of the suspension system absorbing the imperfections in the roadway, allowing the cab of the truck to remain stable.

There are some differences with the prototype truck seen testing here and the renderings of the model that were shown off by GMC at the truck's reveal. Specifically, the front end. Eagle-eyed enthusiasts will note that the headlights and the area between them is not as refined as it was in the original images.

At this point, it is unclear as to why the change has been made and whether or not it's permanent. Likely, it's just fascia that has been deleted for testing and will be replaced when the vehicle heads to production.

The 2022 GMC Hummer EV is slated to go into production this autumn. Find out more about the product rollout plan for the model here.

In the video, GMC also teases the coming of the GMC Hummer EV SUV.

Trending News

 
 

The Michelin VISION tire is the tire of the future for the company

Photo courtesy of Michelin

Sustainability is in focus for most of the world's automakers. Making cars, trucks, SUVs, and vans that pollute the Earth less than their predecessors is their focus alongside emerging safety and driver assistance technology. Others in the auto industry supply chain are also looking to become more sustainable, including Michelin.

The tire company has announced that by 2050, Michelin tires will be made entirely from renewable, recycled, bio sourced, and otherwise sustainable materials. Today, nearly 30 percent of the materials used in manufacturing Michelin Group tires is are sustainable.

A study released last year, Emissions Analytics, an independent global testing and data company that studies real-world emissions and fuel efficiency for passenger and commercial vehicles, found that pollution from tire wear can be 1,000 times worse than what comes out of a vehicle's exhaust pipe. Unlike exhaust pollution, tire and brake pollution is mostly unregulated.

A recipe not as easy as it looks! www.youtube.com

In 2017, Michelin introduced the VISION tire, a concept that is airless, connected, rechargeable, and entirely sustainable. Since then, the company has invested in recycling efforts, buying up rubber pellet recyclers in the State of Georgia and in Spain.

The current lineup of Michelin tires consists of products that contain more than 200 ingredients each. The main part of the equation is natural rubber, which is harvested from rubber trees via a process that requires tapping a tree much in the same way that maple syrup comes from maple trees. Rubber trees traditionally need to be at least six years old before they are harvested.

Other materials in Michelin tires include synthetic rubber, metal, fibers, and components that are designed to strengthen the tire's structure like carbon black, silica, and plasticizers.

In a statement, a spokesperson fro Michelin said, "Michelin's maturity in materials technology stems from the strength of its R&D capabilities, which are supported by 6,000 people working in seven research and development centers around the world and mastering 350 areas of expertise. The commitment of these engineers, researchers, chemists and developers has led to the filing of 10,000 patents covering tyre design and manufacturing. They work hard every day to find the recipes that will improve tyre safety, durability, ride and other performance features, while helping to make them 100-percent sustainable by 2050."

Michelin has partnered with a number of companies to create materials of the future. Axens and IFP Energies Nouvelles, the two companies that are spearheading the BioButterfly project, have been working with Michelin since 2019 on producing bio-sourced butadiene to replace petroleum-based butadiene. Using the biomass from wood, rice husks, leaves, corn stalk, and other plant waste, 4.2 million tons of wood chips could be incorporated into Michelin tires every year with the materials replacement.

A partnership between Michelin and Pyroware can produce recycled styrene from plastics found in packaging. Styrene is used to produce synthetic rubber. Eventually, tens of thousands of tonnes of polystyrene waste could be recycled back into its original products as well as into Michelin tires every year.

Additionally, Michelin will launch the construction of its first tire recycling plant in the world with Encivo, a Swedish company that has developed a patented technology to recover carbon black, pyrolysis oil, steel, gas and other new, high-quality reusable materials from end-of-life tires.

Trending News