Take a Look

Barrett-Jackson puts five iconic cars through the Carvana spinner

A partnership with Barrett-Jackson celebrates the new Carvana spinner technology.

Photo courtesy of Carvanna

Carvana specialized in online car sales before coronavirus made it the thing to do. The used car retailer is showing off their 3D image mapping data in a fresh way, taking advantage of a partnership with famed auctioneers Barrett-Jackson.

The technology recently received a high-tech update. Each model in the company's 15,000-vehicle inventory is now imaged in detail using 64 camera angles, 26,000 LEDs, and gigabytes of mapping data. This allows buyers to see their possible online purchase in as much detail as possible before they buy.

Here's how it works. Before the models are listed, they're each driven into Carvana's dome-shaped photo booth. Once there, it's put on a spinner, "lit to perfection" by the LEDs, and captured in detail by the cameras. The innovation reveals images that are four times clearer than the company's previous spinner camera technology.

Go behind the scenes by watching the video below.

As a treat, buyers can now get up close with a 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS, 1966 Ford Shelby GT350 convertible, 1970 Plymouth Hemi Cuda, 2008 Bugatti Veyron, and 2017 Ford GT via their home computer, laptop, or mobile device.

"We made the virtual vehicle tour a reality when we launched Carvana, providing customers with proprietary, high-definition, 360-degree photography of every vehicle, inside and out, calling out features and imperfections, so they knew exactly what they're buying," said Ernie Garcia, Carvana founder and CEO. "This level of transparency was new to the industry when we launched just seven years ago, so we are incredibly proud to heighten that experience for customers with our advanced imaging technology. And we couldn't ask for a better way to showcase it than with Craig Jackson's epic vehicle collection."

With the imaging technology, details like factory-original black leather seating; in-violet metallic paint; a 3.8-liter, six-cylinder bi-turbo engine; and a 400-watt audio system all come into focus.

To see the vehicles on the spinner, visit Carvana.com/spinner.

To see the company's inventory of used vehicles in detail, including best-sellers like the Hyundai Palisade, Kia Telluride, and Toyota Tacoma, visit Carvana.com.

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This gorgeous 911 sports a rebuilt title.

Cars and Bids

Values of even less desirable Porsche 911 models have skyrocketed in recent years, but the early- to mid-1990s cars have always been special. This one falls well within the parameters, though it's got a backstory that will turn many buyers away. This 1991 Porsche 911 has a rebuilt Texas title, and as one commenter noted, the issue could be the result of a collision with a deer.

Rebuilt title or not, this car's quite the looker. It wears Grand Prix White over black leather, and it feature power windows and exterior mirrors, a sunroof, and a unique Turbo body kit. It has been modified, although lightly, with 18-inch wheels, power front seats, and a new stereo system. Under the rear engine cover lies a turbocharged 3.3-liter flat-six that makes 315 horsepower. It's connected to the rear wheels via a five-speed manual transmission.

1991 Porsche 911This is one of the most iconic sports car silhouettes ever.Cars and Bids

This car's apparently flaw-free appearance hides the rather nasty fact that it has a rebuilt title. A detail-oriented commenter on the auction mentioned finding information on the car's damage, including repairs performed after a collision with a deer and subsequent hair removal. We'll let you decide how that impacts your feelings on the car.

1991 Porsche 911The interior looks untouched, though those are replacement seats.Cars and Bids

If it's any indication of how valuable a good condition example of this car would be, it was bid to $95,000 with a rebuilt title and still didn't meet the reserve price. While it's a bummer for those hoping their bid would be the one, cars like this do occasionally pop up without deer damage, so it's worth keeping your eyes open.

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

Front crash preventionwww.youtube.com

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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