Vintage Vehicles

Restored Porsche 911 Carrera 4 sits at the intersection of history and fashion

Teddy Santis, founder and creative director of Aimé Leon Dore worked with Porsche to restore a vintage 911.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Porsche 964. The name reminds Porsche enthusiasts of the pert and perky 911 era of the late 80s and early 90s that produced the first Porsches with a Tiptronic automatic transmission and all wheel drive as options.

Teddy Santis, founder and creative director of the popular New York fashion label Aimé Leon Dore (ALD), has collaborated with Porsche in restoring a 911 Carrera 4 from that era. The refreshed car is the product of months of research that included journeys to the Porsche Museum and the 911 assembly line in Stuttgart, Germany.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 x Aimé Leon Dore

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG


"Working together with Porsche on this project has been a dream come true," said Santis. "It has been a deeply humbling experience to be entrusted with a project of such importance to the Porsche community and to work together on a design that has been so instrumental in shaping my own outlook and aspirations."

The restoration utilized period-correct original Porsche parts and was supported by Porsche Classic.

The most notable part of the refresh is a fully custom leather interior featuring featuring Schott sunflower leather and Loro Piana houndstooth, the same materials highlighted in Aimé Leon Dore's Fall/Winter 2020 collection. It's bold yet calming and buttery yet strong.

The leather wraps around the dashboard, steering wheel, and door panels. The reverse suede side of the top-grain leather covers up the headliner and sunroof.

The seats of the Carrera 4 were taken to the Recaro workshop inn Kircheim, Germany where they were restored.

At the front, the interior of the frunk was covered in Schott leather with Loro Piana accents. Inside the trunk is a care bag inspired by classic Porsche design.

The exterior of ALD's flagship store on Mulberry Street in Manhattan is painted white and shares its shade with the exterior of the Porsche. A custom-designed grille badge is on the rear and takes inspiration from Porsche club memorabilia.

Nods to Porsche history complete the car including Cup 2 wheels, a graphic Pegasus above the front wheel, a rear ducktail.

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Motul has released a new line of lubricants for "rad" era vehicles.

Photo courtesy of Motul

Motul has been around for 168 years, far longer than automobiles. The new Classic Line of lubricants have been specifically formulated for cars slightly newer, those that are members of the "rad" era. Motul's Classic Line features oils, detergents, and additives that the company has engineered to enhance the performance of older powertrains while offering improved protection.

Each Classic Line lubricant features an additive package with high-zinc (ZDDP) and molybdenum (moly) for reduced friction and increased power. Synthetic base oils and adapted detergent levels of each formulation are suited for metals and gasket materials that are common of the era of vehicle manufacturing. Advanced additives ensure that the lubricants meet or exceed American Petroleum Institute (API) standards.

Motul Eighties 10W30 Motul's Eighties formulation is made for forced induction engine vehicles.Photo courtesy of Motul

The Classic Line's products have high-adhesion properties that are designed to provide excellent cold flow properties to prevent engine wear during start-ups and to coat and protect engine internals and running gear during the periods of prolonged storage that collector vehicles often experience.

Motul Modern Classic Eighties 10W40 meets the needs of forced induction engines while Modern Classic Nineties 10W30 was designed for the demands of high-revving engines with more modern valvetrains. Both Modern Classic oils are the first products to offer high ZDDP and moly for "rad" era collector cars from these two decades.

To get the new 2100 Classic Oil 15W50, Motul revised its 2100 oil to better lubricate and protect naturally aspirated and forced induction engines with flat tappet cams common to the vehicles in the 1970s and beyond.

Motul Classic 10W50 Classic vehicles have different needs and their lubricants have a different formation than Eighties and Nineties branded oils.Photo courtesy of Motul

Classic Oil 20W50 is designed for hot rods, muscle cars, and collector vehicles, and uses additive packages fortified with ~1,800 ppm of ZDDP. According to Motul, this oil provides "improved protection for flat tappet or high-lift cams and high-performance engines with tighter tolerances and older elastomer gaskets; the medium detergent level also makes Classic Oil 20W50 an appropriate break-in oil for newly refurbished engines".

Straight-weight Classic Oil SAE 30 and SAE 50 are mineral monograde engine oils with low detergent levels, blended specifically for gasoline or diesel four-stroke engines generally produced before 1950.

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This one-off Rolls-Royce Phantom is the result of a partnership with Hermès.

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars
A new, bespoke Rolls-Royce Phantom is the result of a partnership between the super luxury automaker and Hermès, a French luxury goods company. The Phantom Oribe was designed and handcrafted by bespoke specialists at both houses after being commissioned by Japanese entrepreneur, art collector and supercar enthusiast Yusaku Maezawa.

The exterior of the car was designed to match the green and cream glazes of antique Japanese Oribe ware, something Maezawa is a prominent collector of. The upper part of the saloon is finished in Oribe Green, a bespoke color created exclusively for this client over the course of many months by specialists in the Surface Finish Center at Goodwood, the home of Rolls-Royce. In an uncharcacteristic twist, the paint formulation will be made available for use on the client's private jet.

The lower section of the car is cream colored.

Rolls-Royce Phantom Oribe design process

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

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The interior of the Phantom is designed to seamlessly meet the exterior as colorways and textures blend to create a unique and intimate riding experience.​ The cabin of the vehicle is finished predominantly in Hermès Enea Green leather, extending from the steering wheel to the duchess handles, gear selector, and rotary controls. Further, it covers the upper instrument panel, interior pillars, and parcel shelf.

The car's glove compartment, luggage compartment lining, center console, and decanter stowage compartment have also been constructed using the material. The glove compartment lid is embossed with the signature Habillé par Hermès Paris.

Delicate Hermès piping adorns the headrest cushions and calf supports of the rear seats, while soft Seashell White accents and matching lambswool floor mats complete the look.

Hermès created all the leather upholstery using stitching and edge-painting techniques originally employed by master saddlers.

Rolls-Royce Phantom Oribe

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars

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The interior also features wooden speaker frets that have been created by perforating open pore Royal Walnut, which also features on the center and rear console and picnic table backs. The Hermès 'Toile H' finds a home on canvas on the door armrests, centre and rear consoles and headliner.

The Phantom's Gallery wears unique artwork that Hermès commissioned that is based on the work of celebrated French artist and illustrator Pierre Péron. The work has been handprinted on the wood and is presented behind a wall of glass.

"This unique Phantom is a fusion of East and West, ancient and modern, serenity and exhilaration. It was a great creative and cultural exchange working with Hermès; we learned a great deal from each other. It is always a pleasure when a client brings us a bold, clear and imaginative vision, and a great thrill to see it realized so perfectly," said Michael Bryden, Lead Designer, Rolls-Royce Bespoke Collective.

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