Vintage Vehicles

Restored Porsche 911 Carrera 4 sits at the intersection of history and fashion

Teddy Santis, founder and creative director of Aimé Leon Dore worked with Porsche to restore a vintage 911.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Porsche 964. The name reminds Porsche enthusiasts of the pert and perky 911 era of the late 80s and early 90s that produced the first Porsches with a Tiptronic automatic transmission and all wheel drive as options.

Teddy Santis, founder and creative director of the popular New York fashion label Aimé Leon Dore (ALD), has collaborated with Porsche in restoring a 911 Carrera 4 from that era. The refreshed car is the product of months of research that included journeys to the Porsche Museum and the 911 assembly line in Stuttgart, Germany.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 x Aimé Leon Dore

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG


"Working together with Porsche on this project has been a dream come true," said Santis. "It has been a deeply humbling experience to be entrusted with a project of such importance to the Porsche community and to work together on a design that has been so instrumental in shaping my own outlook and aspirations."

The restoration utilized period-correct original Porsche parts and was supported by Porsche Classic.

The most notable part of the refresh is a fully custom leather interior featuring featuring Schott sunflower leather and Loro Piana houndstooth, the same materials highlighted in Aimé Leon Dore's Fall/Winter 2020 collection. It's bold yet calming and buttery yet strong.

The leather wraps around the dashboard, steering wheel, and door panels. The reverse suede side of the top-grain leather covers up the headliner and sunroof.

The seats of the Carrera 4 were taken to the Recaro workshop inn Kircheim, Germany where they were restored.

At the front, the interior of the frunk was covered in Schott leather with Loro Piana accents. Inside the trunk is a care bag inspired by classic Porsche design.

The exterior of ALD's flagship store on Mulberry Street in Manhattan is painted white and shares its shade with the exterior of the Porsche. A custom-designed grille badge is on the rear and takes inspiration from Porsche club memorabilia.

Nods to Porsche history complete the car including Cup 2 wheels, a graphic Pegasus above the front wheel, a rear ducktail.

Trending News

 
 

Prototype testing of the new Macan model is underway.

Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

It's passed proving grounds tests and now the all-electric version of the Porsche Macan is hitting the road for additional testing. The highly-camouflaged next-generation prototypes of the compact SUV left the Porsche Development Center in Weissach, Germany for the first time this week.

"Testing in a real-life environment is now getting underway – one of the most important milestones in the development process," said Michael Steiner, Member of the Executive Board, Research and Development, at Porsche AG.

By the time the Macan EV is fully revealed in 2023, it will have garnered 1.8 million test miles worldwide in a variety of terrains and temperatures. Testing will even be done in virtual space, which is designed to save time and money. General Motor is using similar technology. These digital tests are able to analyze properties, systems, and powertrains of a vehicle.

Porsche Macan EV An electric version of the Porsche Macan leaves the company's testing grounds in Germany.Photo courtesy of Porsche AG

Porsche has created 20 digital prototypes for the purpose of simulation in a number of development categories, such as aerodynamics, energy management and acoustics. "We regularly collate the data from the various departments and use it to build up a complete, virtual vehicle that is as detailed as possible," said Dr Andreas Huber, Manager for digital prototypes at Porsche.

The first teams to work with the digital prototypes are aerodynamics specialists. "We started with a flow-around model when the project first started about four years ago," said Dr Thomas Wiegand, Director of aerodynamics development. The goal is a low coefficient of drag that blends that goal with the hallmark looks of the Macan SUV. Currently, engineers are using simulations to fine-tune details such as the cooling air ducts.

Simulations are also able to predict how the vehicle interacts with the driver in real life. "Simulation allows us to assess displays, operating procedures and the changing influences during a journey from the driver's point of view," explains Fabian Klausmann of the Driver Experience development department. This allows research and development team members to see how a driver would interact with the vehicle before any physical cockpit is built.

Porsche is designing the new fully-electric Macan to be the highest performer in its subcompact SUV segment. It will be the first Porsche built on the company's Premium Platform Electric (PPE) architecture.

The boutique performance arm of Volkswagen Group will sell the Macan EV side-by-side with internal combustion engine models of the car. "Demand for electric vehicles continues to rise, but the pace of change varies considerably across the world. That's why we're going to launch another conventionally powered evolution of the current Macan in the course of 2021," said Steiner.

Trending News

 
 

Motul has released a new line of lubricants for "rad" era vehicles.

Photo courtesy of Motul

Motul has been around for 168 years, far longer than automobiles. The new Classic Line of lubricants have been specifically formulated for cars slightly newer, those that are members of the "rad" era. Motul's Classic Line features oils, detergents, and additives that the company has engineered to enhance the performance of older powertrains while offering improved protection.

Each Classic Line lubricant features an additive package with high-zinc (ZDDP) and molybdenum (moly) for reduced friction and increased power. Synthetic base oils and adapted detergent levels of each formulation are suited for metals and gasket materials that are common of the era of vehicle manufacturing. Advanced additives ensure that the lubricants meet or exceed American Petroleum Institute (API) standards.

Motul Eighties 10W30 Motul's Eighties formulation is made for forced induction engine vehicles.Photo courtesy of Motul

The Classic Line's products have high-adhesion properties that are designed to provide excellent cold flow properties to prevent engine wear during start-ups and to coat and protect engine internals and running gear during the periods of prolonged storage that collector vehicles often experience.

Motul Modern Classic Eighties 10W40 meets the needs of forced induction engines while Modern Classic Nineties 10W30 was designed for the demands of high-revving engines with more modern valvetrains. Both Modern Classic oils are the first products to offer high ZDDP and moly for "rad" era collector cars from these two decades.

To get the new 2100 Classic Oil 15W50, Motul revised its 2100 oil to better lubricate and protect naturally aspirated and forced induction engines with flat tappet cams common to the vehicles in the 1970s and beyond.

Motul Classic 10W50 Classic vehicles have different needs and their lubricants have a different formation than Eighties and Nineties branded oils.Photo courtesy of Motul

Classic Oil 20W50 is designed for hot rods, muscle cars, and collector vehicles, and uses additive packages fortified with ~1,800 ppm of ZDDP. According to Motul, this oil provides "improved protection for flat tappet or high-lift cams and high-performance engines with tighter tolerances and older elastomer gaskets; the medium detergent level also makes Classic Oil 20W50 an appropriate break-in oil for newly refurbished engines".

Straight-weight Classic Oil SAE 30 and SAE 50 are mineral monograde engine oils with low detergent levels, blended specifically for gasoline or diesel four-stroke engines generally produced before 1950.

Trending News