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More details of 2023 Cadillac Lyriq revealed, including price and charging speed

The 2023 Cadillac Lyriq offers 300+ miles of range and a good amount of passenger space.

Photo courtesy of Cadillac

The 2023 Cadillac Lyriq was shown for the first time last year with plenty of teasing to go along with the information regarding its battery electric powertrain. Now the automaker is showing off more of the SUV, including its interior, and revealing more about the crossover's powertrain.

The 2023 Lyriq rides on Cadillac's rear-wheel drive Ultium platform. It's a few inches wider and longer than the 2021 Lexus RX 350, but its wheelbase is considerably longer 109 inches vs. 121 inches) becuase of the lack of limitations with an electric powertrain. The Lyriq bests the interior dimensions of the RX everywhere except in the hip-room category where its front and rear seat fall short by more than an inch.

2023 Cadillac Lyriq: Exterior

Photo courtesy of Cadillac

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The Lyriq weighs about as much as a Mercedes-Benz GLS.

Powering the Lyriq is a 12-module, 100 kilowatt-hour battery pack. Cadillac estimates that the car will deliver 340 horsepower and 325 pound-feet of torque, making it slightly more powerful than the 2021 Cadillac XT5. The automaker figures that the pack will allow for over 300 miles of all-electric range with a full charge.

Initial information shows that all-wheel drive will not be available.

The Lyriq is able to charge at DC fast charing stations at a rate of up to 190 kilowatts. That enables it to add 76 miles of range in abut 10 minutes and 195 miles of range in 30 minutes when charging in optimal conditions. For home charging, Lyriq is able to charge at a rate of 19.2 kilowatts, which allows it to add up to 52 miles of range per hour of charge. Trickle charging will yield a gain of 3.5 miles of ranger per hour of charge time.

Cadillac engineers have given the Lyric Regen on Demand technology, which allows drivers to control how quickly the Lyriq slows down or comes to a complete stop during a pressure-sensitive paddle on the steering wheel.

The car's black crystal grille and long lighting blades give the car unique features and tie it in with the Cadillac family's looks.

A long list of standard and available features has been revealed for the model. The roster includes: Super Cruise, 33-inch LED display, active noise cancellation technology, LED headlamps with a choreographed lighting sequence, a 19-speaker AKG sound system, KeyPass digital vehicle access, dual level charging cord, 20-inch six-spoke alloy wheels, and 22-inch dynamic split-spoke Reverse Rim alloy wheels.

The car's standard 20-inch wheels come wrapped in all-season, self-sealing tires. The available 22-inchers get all-season, low-profile, self-sealing tires.

2023 Cadillac Lyriq: Interior

Photo courtesy of Cadillac

Only two exterior paint colors are available: Satin Steel Metallic and Stellar Black Metallic. Interior color schemes include Sky Cool Gray and Noir.

The interior of the Lyriq is very similar to that of the Escalade. Like its big brother, the Lyriq has a large, curved screen that spans half the dashboard.

With its rear seat folded, the Lyriq has about twice the cargo space as the Lexus RX. Behind the rear seat, the Lyriq bests the RX's cargo space by 12 cubic feet.

The 2023 Cadillac LYRIQ is expected to go into production in the first quarter of 2022, with pricing starting at $59,9907. It will be produced at GM's Spring Hill, Tennessee assembly plant.

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The 2021 Audi E-Tron is able to tow a modest amount.

Photo courtesy of Audi AG

Discussing electric vehicles (EVs) today is a funny thing, because the models people are most excited about haven't yet hit the market. That's even more true for EVs with towing capabilities, as electric pickup trucks won't start leaving factory assembly lines until mid-2021 at the absolute earliest, and most are months behind that ambitious timeline. Still, looking at what we can buy today, along with models that will soon be available, we can get a good feel for where the EV world stands on towing.

As we get closer to the end of 2021, we'll start to see even more electric vehicles with respectable towing capacities. GMC has been quiet on the capabilities of its Hummer EV, but its power numbers and size indicate that it'll be one to watch. Ford already towed a freight train with a prototype of its EV pickup, but again, no word on actual numbers. We also know that Chevrolet will roll out an electric pickup of its own, but don't count on seeing the Silverado name on the electrified model.

2022 GMC Hummer EV The 2022 GMC Hummer EV is expected to arrive late this year. Photo courtesy of GMC

It's important to remember that towing capacity is different than payload capacity, which deals with the weight of the vehicle itself, plus any fluids, passengers, and cargo. It's also good to note that most vehicles, even today's gas pickup trucks, need to be properly equipped before they're able to tow anything, trailer or otherwise. Many vehicles, such as the Tesla Model Y on our list, require a towing package, which adds a hitch and other hardware, as well as software patches to handle the strain that towing puts on the vehicle.

Don't get caught up in fancy range and torque numbers, because just like their gas counterparts, EVs will be nowhere near as efficient while pulling a trailer. There's some dispute over whether the outrageous torque claims from GMC and Tesla are real, or an engineering flim-flam meant to tempt an unknowing public.

If you're looking for an EV and need to tow, this is a decent time to be in the market, but the longer you can wait the more selection you'll have. Be prepared to open your wallet for an electric vehicle of any type, however, because most are currently more expensive than comparable gas models. No matter where you end up with your next towing rig, gas or electric, be sure you understand your vehicle's capabilities and your own skill before hitting the road.

Tesla Model Y

Tesla Model Y

Photo courtesy of Tesla

Towing Capacity: 3,500 pounds
It may seem farfetched that an electric crossover could tow a trailer, but the three models on our list that you can actually walk out and buy today are crossovers. The all-wheel drive Model Y is rated at up to 3,500 pounds but must be equipped with a $1,200 tow package, which includes a high-strength steel tow bar with two-inch hitch receiver, a trailer harness with NA 7-pin standard connector, and a tow mode software package. That's on top of the Model yYs ability to carry up to seven people and blistering performance.

Hyundai Ioniq 5

2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Photo courtesy of Hyundai Motor Group

Towing Capacity: 3,500 pounds
Like its corporate cousin, Kia, Hyundai is set to debut a surprisingly capable small EV for 2022. The Ioniq 5 brings quirky forward-looking style to the table, along with a stout 3,500-pound tow rating. Hyundai says that the Ioniq 5 will sport a driving range of between 250 and 300 miles, and notes that it will be available with two powertrain options, one that can deliver 215 horsepower and a more powerful unit with 315 horsepower. The Hyundai offers a clean, futuristic cabin with two large driver-oriented screens, and will be available with semi-autonomous driving features.

Rivian R1T and R1S

Rivian R1S

Photo courtesy of Rivian

Towing Capacity: 11,000 pounds
Rivian captured everyone's attention with big investments from Ford, Amazon, and others, but it will also be one of the first companies to deliver an electric pickup truck when the first units land in late 2021. The R1T is a compelling electric truck with supercar acceleration, legitimate off-road chops, and the ability to tow up to 11,000 pounds, which puts it on par with some of the best full-size trucks available today. Making things even better for Rivian buyers, the company's R1S SUV will sport much of the same capability and a towing capacity of up to 7,700 pounds.

Tesla Cybertruck

Tesla Cybertruck Photo courtesy of Tesla

Towing Capacity: 14,000 pounds
The Cybertruck's unveiling press event was weird on a bunch of levels, from Elon Musk's theatrics to a broken window, of all things. But if any of the specs that were laid out at the event and soon after are true, the funky Tesla will be a revelation for people needing to tow heavy loads. Mixed in with a bunch of other eye-popping specs are the towing numbers. In its most basic configuration, Tesla says the traditional Cybertruck will be able to tow up to 7,500 pounds, but in its most capable configurations the truck is said to tow up to 14,000 pounds.

It's important to take a step back for a moment and note that nobody's actually driven or tested the Cybertruck and things could change drastically before it actually reaches the market.

Audi E-Tron Sportback

2021 Audi E-Tron Sportback Photo courtesy of Audi AG

Towing Capacity: 4,000 pounds
Audi's electric offerings range from cushy premium crossovers to red-hot electric sports sedans, and some can tow an impressive amount. The E-Tron Sportback is one, and with the ability to tow up to 4,000 pounds, it can take the whole family, all of their gear, and pull a small trailer at the same time. On top of that, the Audi's interior is packed with upscale materials and useful tech.

Volvo XC40 Recharge

Volvo XC40 Recharge side plug Photo courtesy of Volvo Cars

Towing Capacity: 3,307 pounds
The funky XC40 crossover got an all-electric model a couple of years ago, and though it's small, the Recharge EV model can tow up to 3,307 pounds. The crossover's upright and slightly boxy shape give it excellent headroom inside, and the folding seats inside open up the storage area to a decent 47.39 cubic feet of cargo space. To sweeten the pot, Volvo offers the XC40 Recharge with several desirable feature, such as a panoramic sunroof, a large touchscreen infotainment system, and the latest advanced driver assistance tech.

Kia EV6

2022 Kia EV6 GT-Line Photo courtesy of Kia Motors

Towing Capacity: 3,500 pounds
Despite its name being strikingly similar to a popular band from the 1990s, the Kia EV6 has some serious capability. When properly equipped, it can tow up to 3,500 pounds which is more than enough for a small boat or trailer. That's impressive for such a small vehicle, but the Kia offers more than that, with futuristic looks, an available long-range battery, and an open, airy cabin.

Volkswagen ID.4

2021 Volkswagen ID.4: Exterior Photo courtesy of Volkswagen AG

Towing Capacity: 2,200 pounds
The Volkswagen ID.4 isn't the most powerful vehicle on our list, but it's got just enough capability to get the job done for folks wanting to pull a small trailer or boat. The ID.4's tow rating of 2,200 pounds may not be all that impressive, but its price tag, upscale interior, and clever features make it a compelling choice among small electric crossovers. The ID.4 also gets a slew of advanced driver aids, many of which are standard, as well as a 10.0-inch infotainment touchscreen with navigation.

Polestar 2

2021 Polestar 2 Photo courtesy of Polestar

Towing Capacity: 2,000 pounds
The Polestar 2 lands just under VW ID.4 at the low end of the towing spectrum, with capability of pulling up to 2,000 pounds. Volvo's sub-brand offers plenty of other compelling features for the vehicle that more than make up for the slight lack of towing ability. Polestar says the 2 can accelerate from zero to 60 mph in under five seconds, and notes that the vehicle is built with the goal of being as sustainable as possible in the areas of battery design and manufacturing.

Tesla Model X

2021 Tesla Model X Photo courtesy of Tesla Motors

Towing Capacity: 5,000 pounds
Tesla's funky gullwing-doored crossover is weird, expensive, and surprisingly capable. When properly equipped, the Model X can tow up to 5,000 pounds. It's also blazingly quick, and in some configurations can reach 60 mph from a standstill in just 2.5 seconds. Teslas are also known for their technology, and the Model X is no different. It can be equipped with advanced driver assist systems and comes with one of the largest and most functional infotainment touchscreens on the market today.

Hyundai Kona Electric

2020 Hyundai Kona Electric Photo courtesy of Hyundai Motor America

Towing Capacity: 2,800 pounds
Hyundai's EV offerings are growing in number and sophistication, and no vehicle illustrates that point better than the Kona Electric. The tiny but mighty Hyundai Kona Electric is able to tow up to 2,800 pounds when properly equipped, and with an MSRP that lands well under $40,000, it brings a healthy dose of value to the table as well. Though the Kona isn't offered with all-wheel drive, its 201-horsepower electric motor is strong enough to propel it from zero to 60 mph in a little over six seconds.

Audi E-Tron

2021 Audi E-Tron

Photo courtesy of Audi AG

Towing Capacity: 4,000 pounds
Another crossover. This time from a legacy European automaker with a catalog full of premium vehicles. The E-Tron is powered by twin electric motors with up to 402 horsepower and 490 pound-feet of torque. On top of that, it's got a top speed of 124 mph and a cabin packed with upscale materials. Audi also says that the E-Tron is good to tow up to 4,000 pounds, which is plenty for a small trailer or boat.

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Toyota's Indiana plant is getting a makeover and adding two models.

Photo courtesy of Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. Inc.

In the middle of a press release regarding an $800 million investment in Toyota Motor Manufacturing Indiana (TMMI), Toyota let it slip that two new models will find their place on the production line there - one Toyota and one Lexus.

The two new three-row SUVs are designed with the "active Gen Y American Family in mind". To figure out what they will be, look no further than our list of the new vehicle trademarks that Toyota and Lexus have put forth in the last few months.

The automaker has already filed to trademark the names "Grand Highlander", "TX350", and "TX500h". If you were a gambler, you'd want to put money on at least one of these models being a take on the Lexus LF-1 Limitless concept that was presented a few years ago at the North American International Auto Show. That three-row, coupe-like SUV was a touch ahead of the trend in terms of body styling and was very well received by dealers, media, and the public.

Lexus LF-1 Limitless concept The Lexus LF-1 Limitless concept was well-received by dealers, media, and the public when it premiered half a decade ago.Photo courtesy of Lexus

There's also the possibility that the forthcoming "Grand Highlander" may be a new Sequoia under a fresh name.

The "TX350" and "TX500h" filing makes it apparent that the vehicle will likely come with the same base engine as the Lexus RX, a 3.5-liter V6, and perhaps get a hybrid variant of the 5.0-liter V8 that's in the forthcoming 2022 Lexus IS 500 F Sport.

The release also said that the vehicles will have a semi-automated driving system. Lexus Teammate, a system with characteristics similar to what Toyota has described, will come first to the 2022 Lexus LS 500h. It has Level 2 functionality that "allows for driving on limited-access highways with partial hands-free, eyes-on-the-road operation", according to the automaker.

The announcement from Toyota says that the details of the forthcoming eight-passenger vehicles will be announced "at a later date".

"Over the past 20 years, Toyota has led the way with more electrified vehicles on the road than all automakers combined," said Ted Ogawa, president and CEO of Toyota Motor North America. "This investment and new vehicle line-up will allow us to continue our work with electrification, expand our portfolio to around 70 models globally by 2025, and meet the needs of our customers while we accelerate towards carbon neutrality."

Traditionally it takes 12 to 18 months to build out a factory following an announcement of this nature.

The investment in TMMI will bring 1,400 new jobs to the Princeton, Indiana plant. The factory, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, currently has over 7,200 employees. It's currently the home of the Toyota Sienna, Sequoia, and Highlander.

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