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Acura explores its origin story in a new ad for the redesigned 2022 MDX

The Acura MDX is on sale now.

Photo courtesy of Acura

Acura's new storyline has all the hallmarks of a feel good comeback. Not only is the automaker turning out high-level premium vehicles, it's making them sportier than they have been in a very long time. But, it wasn't all that long ago that the product lineup became mundane after years of inspiring drivers and being the go-to premium performance brand.

But now it's back. The move first signaled by the emergence of the Acura Precision Concept has played out, first on the RDX then on the TLX and MDX. There's more to come. Acura's planning new Type S models, designed to bring out the purest expression of performance you can get from the brand outside of its NSX sports car. There's other things on the horizon too.

A new video from the company showcases its heritage and gives brand enthusiasts a peek at what is coming for in the pipeline. Spoiler alert: it's more performance-centric vehicles.

2022 Acura MDX - “Origin Story”www.youtube.com

Acura enthusiasts will instantly recognize the names of people sharing the Acura story in the video: Jon Ikeda, vice president and Acura Brand Officer and Art St. Cyr, vice president of the Automobile Operations Division of American Honda Motor Co., Inc. among them. Ikeda is largely responsible for this next chapter of Acura, himself a performance enthusiast. St. Cyr traces his Honda ties into the motorsports community, a niche market that plays heavy into this brand evolution.

The NSX is featured alongside the 2022 Acura MDX in the video. The MDX was elevated as part of the company's new strategy to has a more luxurious interior and dynamic handling as part of the redesign. The difference between the 2020 and 2022 model is like night and day.

The same can be said for the 2021 Acura TLX. A TLX Type S version is on the way this May giving the company its first Type S in years. The Acura MDX Type S is expected later this year.

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New electric SUV

Honda teases its first EV

The Prologue will go on sale as a 2024 model.

Honda

Honda is nearing the unveiling of its first electric vehicle, the Prologue, and today the automaker gave us our first glimps of the new vehicle. It's just a sketch, but Honda did share some production details and information on its product roadmap.

Honda DealerHonda plans to sell half a million EVs by the end of the decade. Honda

Honda says the Prologue will be an adventure-ready SUV "capable of satisfying everyday driving and weekend getaways with a strong hint of the well-received Honda e in the front fascia." The SUV was developed in Honda's Design Studio in Los Angeles, and was designed with an eye on Honda's global EV models. Honda said it focused on aerodynamics and fine-tuning the body to reducelines and improve range.

The Japanese automaker developed the Prologue alongside GM, but it has other EVs coming to market by 2026. By 2030, Honda says it will release 30 new EVs globally with a production volume of two million units. The co-developed vehicle is the first, but the rest will be built on Honda e:Architecture. In 2027, the automaker will begin building and selling a line of affordable EVs using the architecture developed with General Motors. Honda says it plans to sell half a million EVs in North America by the end of hte decade.

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The IIHS may increase the speeds it uses to test advanced driver aids.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) recently announced that it is considering changing the speeds it uses to test vehicle-to-vehicle front crash prevention systems. The agency currently tests the systems at 12 and 25 mph, but says that the speeds don't accurately represent the types of crashes the safety tech is meant to prevent.

Front crash preventionwww.youtube.com

Automatic emergency braking (AEB) is designed to notify of a possible collision and help respond with automatic application of braking. Just like a human using the brake pedal, it can stop the car, but higher speeds make it difficult to stop in time. The new tests would be conducted at 35 to 45 mph, which is the range where a large number of rear-end crashes occur. As Automotive News noted, an IIHS study showed 43 percent of rear-end crashes occur at speeds of 45 mph or less, so it's important to have a test that shows how well the tech performs at those levels.

A whopping 85 percent of 2022 vehicles earned a "Superior" rating in the current testing regime, so the IIHS will remove it from 2023 testing and Top Safety Pick award evaluations. Their view is that, since the majority of vehicles meet the criteria, it's no longer an accurate way of evaluating performance. In its place, the agency introduced a night test for automatic emergency braking systems that will begin next year.

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