Behind the Wheel

2020 Lamborghini Urus Review: It's a Lamborghini where it counts

The Lamborghini Urus will make the dreams of 10-year old boys come true ... in SUV form.

Photo courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini

When buying a supercar, personality matters. In the same way that the breed of dog you own reflects on the type of person you are, a supercar brand says a lot.

Buy a Ferrari and it's likely that you're a racing enthusiast and passionate about automotive history. A McLaren and you might be all about precision engineering. An Aston Martin might mean you want to be Sean Connery's 007.

But a Lamborghini is about flash. Scissor doors, loud colors, and louder exhausts — that's what Automobili Lamborghini is, and it's perhaps the best carmaker in the world when it comes to those things. It's a ten-year old boy's bedroom wall poster.

2020 Lamborghini Urus The Urus is a sight, taking the best lines of the typical Lamborghini car for a spin in the shape of an SUV.Photo courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini

It's why when I picked up a friend's ten-year old niece from school in the Lamborghini Urus — a $270,034 SUV based on the Audi Q7 — a ten-year old boy on the playground yelled "LOOK A LAMBORGHINI!" That one outburst captures everything that matters about this car.

It's loud and brash and has the largest brakes ever fitted to a road-going car, and it's everything you could possibly want it to be. If you're the type to buy a Lamborghini, at least.

Here's a dirty secret about supercars: they suck to drive. They're about as comfortable to sit in as a dentist chair. They're finicky and have terrible turning radii, and you're constantly terrified of scraping the ridiculously low nose on every speed bump and driveway. And they're utterly unusable as cars, because there's no place to put people and stuff and you can't fit groceries in their tiny trunks and they're just utterly pointless for anything but going on a racetrack which most supercar buyers will never, ever do.

2020 Lamborghini Urus Just because it's an SUV, that doesn't mean that Lamborghini has lost touch with its design and engineering hallmarks.Photo courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini

But the Lamborghini Urus gets you 95 percent of the way there, which means it's the best Lamborghini you can buy. It gets ten-year olds to yell and point, while simultaneously giving you a thrill every time you turn it on because Lamborghini has put the engine start/stop switch under a red button to make it feel like you're launching a missile. And to put it in drive, you need to pull on the giant flappy paddle instead of hitting a button because buttons are just so pedestrian.

And you put it in reverse by pulling on a giant handle in the middle of the center console, and then you change between drive modes with a switch that feels like you're putting on the afterburners on a fighter jet. Everything about the Urus is an event, which makes sense because that whole control scheme is pulled straight from the Huracan supercar — only you're in a big, comfortable SUV that you can fill with luggage and four humans and that can get over speed bumps without issue.

The exhaust is loud if you want it to be and quiet (or relatively so) when you don't. It has 360-degree cameras, which means it's easy-ish to park even though the rear visibility is truly terrible for an SUV. That's another reminder that you're driving a Lamborghini, because who cares what's behind you?

2020 Lamborghini Urus The interior of the car shares many components with the Huracan.Photo courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini

I took the Urus to the South Orange County Cars and Coffee, and it drew as many admiring glances as all the zillion-dollar supercars parked around it. It's an attention-getter, which is, after all, what a Lamborghini is all about. And you can take it to Whole Foods and it won't give you a backache if you take it to Vegas for the weekend.

People on the street were coming up to me the entire time I had it. I got constant thumbs up in traffic or folks taking selfies with it when it was parked. It has all the appeal of a Lamborghini sports car with none of the drawbacks.

A lot of people made jokes about it being a fancy Audi Q7 because that's what it is, somewhere underneath. But then Lamborghini equipped it with staggeringly beautiful 22-inch rims ($4,420) and an outrageous amount of exterior carbon fiber trim ($22,177) and a Bang & Olufsen stereo ($6,313) that only really shines when you've cranked the volume higher than is probably safe for your hearing.

2020 Lamborghini Urus The Urus is as functional for families as the average SUV Photo courtesy of Automobili Lamborghini

It might be a boring Audi somewhere underneath, but the Urus is a Lamborghini where it counts: in your heart. There's no logical reason to spend $270,034 on a car. But that doesn't matter, because inside every Lamborghini buyer is a ten-year old boy with a bedroom wall that needs adornment. If you buy this car, you'll be making that boy's dreams come true — and making dreams come true is what supercars are all about.

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The Hispano Suiza Carmen Boulogne is an all-electric hypercar

Photo courtesy of Hispano Suiza

The Hispano Suiza brand has been around for more than a century. Now primarily known as an aerospace company, the automotive side of the business is attempting a revival, first with the Carmen's introduction and now with the Carmen Boulogne, a sportier take on the Carmen.

The Carmen Boulogne is a fully electric and exclusive hypercar that was designed, developed, and manufactured in Barcelona, Spain. The company will create just five examples for sale.

Its name origin stretches back to 1921 when Hispano Suiza made a racing version of its high-performance H6 Coupé and entered it in the George Boillot Cup, an endurance race lasting more than 3.5 hours around the French city of Boulogne. Hispano Suiza took the win at the race in 1921, 1922, and 1923.

Hispano Suiza Carmen Boulogne Photo courtesy of Hispano Suiza

The Hispano Suiza Carmen Boulogne delivers 1,098 horsepower and has an electronically limited maximum speed of 180 mph. The car can get form zero to 60 mph in 2.6 seconds and weighs 3,593 pounds. Its weight is 60 pounds less than the traditional Carmen, a number that was achieved by changing out traditional structural elements for a carbon fiber subframe, among other parts. Additionally, the entire body of the car is carbon fiber.

The car's 80 kilowatt hour battery gives it a driving range of up to 248 miles. That's similar to the range of the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E. Its battery is designed and produced in-house, and has fast-charging capability of more than 80 kilowatts, taking just 30 minutes to charge from 30 to 80 percent via a CCS2 fast charger. It also has CHAdeMO and GB/T charging options.

Each rear wheel of the car has two permanent-magnet synchronous motors. The torque deliver of each motor is controlled through a vectoring system honed by experience in Formula E racing. Off the line through 6,500 rpm, the car is capable of reaching 1,180 pound-feet of torque.

The face of the car has the same semi-circular headlights and scowl as the Carmen, with the difference of a copper-colored grille. Buyers can customize their model to include either suede or black Alcantara on the dashboard and door panels.

Hispano Suiza Carmen Boulogne

Photo courtesy of Hispano Suiza

The price of the Hispano Suiza Carmen Boulogne starts at $2 million USD, and its manufacturing process requires approximately twelve month of lead time.

The five units of the Carmen Boulogne hypercar join the 14 units of the Carmen to reach a total of 19 units in production, with the first unit ready to be delivered in 2022.

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The 2021 Kia Sorento is towing the numerals for the 2020 Times Square New Year's Eve ball drop ceremony across the country.

Photo courtesy of Kia Motors

The journey is underway. As many Americans are eager to close out 2020, Kia is working to make the end of the year happen in style. A 2021 Kia Sorento is hauling the iconic numerals for the One Times Square ball drop ceremony across the country with planned stops in Nevada, Arizona, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York.

"New Year's Eve is typically seen as a fresh start and a new beginning, and that holds true this year more than ever. With its rugged capability, the Kia Sorento will bring a little piece of the energy and fun of New Year's Eve in Times Square to people nationwide. This will also be a reminder that we're all in this together and that the New Year brings new opportunities and excitement," said Russell Wager, director, marketing operations, Kia Motors America.

2007 New Year's Eve Ball Drop Numerals Workers unload the giant '7' completing the "2-0-0-7" sign for the New Year's Eve celebration in Times Square December 13, 2006 in New York City.Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

The fourth-generation Sorento started its journey at Kia's North American headquarters in Irvine, California. Its journey will end in Times Square, the New Year's Eve heart of New York City, where the SUV and its cargo will be on display for three days along with other vehicles, before being installed on the top of One Times Square awaiting the iconic ball drop ceremony.

Kia lists the vehicle as being able to tow up to 3,500 pounds in the SX Prestige X-Line trim when equipped with the available factory-installed tow hitch, a $475 add-on.

At select points along the way, National Geographic will document the Sorento's journey, bringing stories from its stops to life through photography and video.

The publicity stunt culminates in the launch of a new creative campaign for the 2021 Sorento, which will debut during "Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve with Ryan Seacrest 2021" on ABC. During the broadcast, you may see some Kia employees in the Times Square. They are there courtesy of the company, who will be hosting them at the event.

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