Features & Specs

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid features and powertrains broken down by trim level

The Honda CR-V Hybrid is a competitively priced new entry into the market.

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Honda has brought a new hybrid version of its CR-V to market this year, the 2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid. Aimed to squarely take on the Toyota RAV4 Hybrid, the model has a competitive starting price of $27,750.

There are four grades of the 2020 CR-V Hybrid. All trim levels carry a $1,120 destination fee. Here's how they break down by trim level.


2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid LX

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Honda has given this base model a price tag of $27,750.

It comes standard with the 2.0-liter four-cylinder hybrid powertrain with dual-motor functionality and all-wheel drive. The CR-V Hybrid has Sport, Econ, and EV drive modes. It also comes standard with an electric parking brake. This is the same for all trim levels.

Buyers get automatic LED high and low beam headlights, keyless entry and push-button start, body-color door handles, remote start black exterior mirrors, and 17-inch alloy wheels.

The cabin features a USB port, single-automatic climate control, 5-inch infotainment touch screen, and a four-speaker audio system.

The automaker has make its Honda Sensing suite of safety and driver assistance technologies standard on the CR-V Hybrid, as well as a multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines.

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid EX

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

The second-tier CR-V Hybrid EX has a starting MSRP of $30,260 and comes with a number of desirable bells and whistles not found on the base LX grade.

In addition to the equipment on the CR-V Hybrid LX, it gets LED fog lights and heated body-colored side mirrors with integrated turn signals. Replacing the 17-inch wheels are 18-inch alloys.

Instead of just one USB port, this model adds two rear USB ports. It also gets dual-zone automatic climate control, a one-touch moonroof, 7-inch infotainment touch screen, Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto. The driver's seat gets two-position seat memory.

The model adds blind spot monitoring with rear cross traffic alert and the rearview camera has dynamic guide lines that move when the steering wheel moves.

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid EX-L

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

Honda adds creature comfort and convenience features to the CR-V Hybrid EX-L including a heated steering wheel, ambient lighting, leather seats, power tailgate, a four-way adjustable passenger seat, four additional rear speakers, automatic dimming rearview mirror, leather-wrapped steering wheel, leather-wrapped shifter, and the HomeLink. HomeLink allows users to transfer the capabilities of their garage door opener to the car so they don't have to have the opener on display in the vehicle for use.

The CR-V Hybrid EX-L starts at $32,750.

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid Touring

2020 Honda CR-V Hybrid

Photo courtesy of American Honda Motor Co., Inc.

The CR-V Hybrid Touring is Honda's top-level offering and it starts at $35,950.

In addition to all the features listed for the EX-L model, Honda has given the Touring grade wireless charging, navigation, roof rails, rain-sensing wipers, a hands-free tailgate, and an additional speaker.

The SUV sees the 18-inch wheels of the EX-L replaced with 19-inchers in this model.

Trending News

 
 

The 2021 Honda Accord Sport is a budget-friendly model with a lot of pep.

Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Critics and buyers have loved the Honda Accord for a few decades now. Though it's frequently compared to the Toyota Camry, there's some models in its class that are giving the Accord a run for its money - the Mazda Mazda6, Subaru Legacy, Kia K5, and the Hyundai Sonata just to name a few.

Where the Accord wins versus the competition isn't on price or features, styling or appointments, tech or drivetrain. It wins because it's a whole package, especially as tested in the 2021 Accord Sport variety.

For the new model year, Honda has focused on updating the fascia and improving the tech in the Accord. They're all good gains.

2021 Honda Accord Sport The car's wheels help elevate the sporty profile of the car.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

For the 2021 model year, Honda sells the Accord in six trim levels: LX, Sport 1.5T, Sport Special Edition (SE), EX-L, Sport 2.0T, and Touring. Honda leant the Sport 2.0T, which has an upgraded powerful 2.0-liter turbo-four is paired with a 10-speed automatic transmission and produces 252 hp and 273 lb-ft of torque. It's available in Accord Sport 2.0T and Touring grades. The 2.0-liter is far more fun to drive than the base 1.5-liter four-pot.

Honda has done a good job differentiating the Accord from the Acura lineup, making its drive dynamics not nearly as athletic as the TLX's but still engaging, while allowing for pointed steering and easy maneuverability. Acceleration won't knock anyone's socks off, but that's not a reason to ignore the Accord. The Accord Sport has paddle shifters, which work better for mountain driving situations than they do for deriving true sport functionality, as you would get with a manual transmission.

Honda has also upgraded the braking system for 2021, designing it to engage more smoothly, especially at low speeds. The result is measured performance that is neither grabby nor soft.

Honda upholsters the Accord Sport with cloth seats but nice finishes elsewhere. While a lot of attention is given to leather upholstery, there's actually nothing wrong with the cloth seats. The ones in the Accord Sport are not only attractive but don't draw the heat of the sun or cold of the clouds and snow into them like leather does.

2021 Honda Accord Sport The interior of the Accord Sport is well appointed.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Buyers can spec their Accord Sport with a number of options, including appearance and weather protection packages. But, with the 2.0-liter powertrain, it already comes loaded with most of the desirable features buyers want including an 8.0-inch infotainment touch screen, 12-way power-adjustable driver's seat, eight-speaker audio system, leather-wrapped steering wheel, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, a leather shift knob, rear spoiler, sport pedals, chrome exhaust finishers, fog lights, moonroof, heated front seats, remote keyless entry and engine start, and a wireless device charger.

The Honda Accord Sport starts at $27,430. Upgrading the engine adds $4,530 to that price tag, but also gets you the moonroof, heated seats, power-adjustable driver's seat, remote functionality, and device charger. That brings the MSRP of the Sport 2.0T to near $32,000. Knock a few bucks off in dealership negotiations and you're sitting quite pretty for under $30,000.

In the Sport trim level, the Accord is just as nice as Mazdas, nicer than the K5, and on-par with the Sonata. The Mazda is equally as engaging to drive but its infotainment system leaves a lot to be desired.

2021 Honda Accord Sport Honda's steering wheel makes operation of radio, cruise control, and driver assist features easy.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

2021 Honda Accord Sport

Subaru offers all-wheel drive standard on the Legacy, something the Accord does not. But, it's not as powerful nor is its infotainment system as nicely designed. The Sonata also isn't as powerful and the sporty Sonata N Line grade takes track-readiness a step too far, ruining ride quality. The K5 might end up being the Accord's closest competitor with plenty of power, but the interior is more parts bin than is optimal.

But what about the Camry? The Toyota, now with available all-wheel drive, does offer a lot to its customer base, but it's aging quickly, especially the interior. Other models offer just as good dependability and for a lower price. They're also more fun to drive.

Trending News

 
 

This colorful 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera MFI Safari is up for auction later this month.

Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions
When it's in a competition, it's a winning streak of pink, yellow, and silver. This 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera MFI Safari Rally Car is headed to auction with the model set to cross the block during the Silverstone Auctions Race Retro Live Online Auction this spring.

The Tuthill Porsche 911 started its life in January 1975 as a relatively rare Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 MFI Coupe. The models were only produced from 1974 to 1976 and were mechanically identical to the 1973 Carrera RS.

It was converted to a rally car in the early 1990s and campaigned extensively by legendary Irish driver, Billy Coleman. Coleman is Ireland's most successful motorsport rally driver—in 20 years of racing he has claimed 29 victories.

1975 Porsche 911 Carrera MFI Safari Modifications to the Porsche have made it ready for off-roading competitions.Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

1975 Porsche 911 Carrera MFI Safari

In 1998, the car was hired for The RAC Historic rally by Silverstone Auctions Managing Director, Nick Whale. Recognizing its power and prowess, Whale purchased the car and continued to race it, wining the 1999 Safety Devices Rally Challenge outright. It also won the British Historic Rally Championship held in 2000 over eight rounds, four tarmac and four gravel events.

The car was sold in May 2002 and rallied by new owners for the next decade. It would then be converted by Tuthills into a full house East African Safari spec rally car.

"We are thrilled to offer a car with such outstanding history and one that I have previously owned and won in, for our first sale of 2021," said Nick Whale, Silverstone Auctions Managing Director. "The 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera MFI Safari Rally Car really is a credit and privilege to offer in our tenth year as the official auction partner for Race Retro!"

The interior of the 911 is rally-ready.Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The car has competed in and finished four East African Safari events. In 2017, the car took the top spot on the podium, winning it outright, with driver Ryan Champion behind the wheel.

This Porsche 911 was even selected by Porsche Club GB as one of 30 specially invited cars to attend as well as participating in Porsches 50th Birthday celebrations at Brands Hatch circuit in 2018.

The car comes with MSA papers and an FIA HTP.

The Tuthills modifications are valued at £40,000. Newly built cars today are around £300,000 plus VAT.

The car features a lifted body style.Photo courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

Trending News