Hollywood

Ford Mustang GT from 'Bullitt' movie sells for record $3.4 million at auction

At the Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale Auction in Scottsdale, the Ford Mustang GT featured in the movie "Bullitt" sold for $3.4 million.

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

In 1968, a Ford Mustang GT drove up San Francisco streets and across movie screens in the iconic Steve McQueen film "Bullitt." Today, one of the two Mustangs used in the film, dubbed the Ford Mustang Bullitt, crossed the auction block at a Mecum Auctions event in Kissimmee, Florida selling for $3.4 million.

Its sale price makes the sports car, colloquially known Bullitt Mustang, the most expensive Mustang sold at auction to date. The car originally sold for $3,500.

1968 Ford Mustang Bullitt

Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Company

For decades, it was thought that the original Mustangs used in the movie was lost to the annals of history. They weren't.

One was sent to a salvage yard and then resurfaced in 2017 in Baja, California. The other was purchased by a private buyer.

Instead of living it's best Hollywood life, the second Mustang was actually doing duty as a daily driver for the Kiernan family. McQueen tried to buy the Mustang from the family on numerous occasions but was rebuffed each time.

Instead of being driven by McQueen, the car wracked up 65,055 miles on its odometer as a daily driver and then was parked in 1981. The decades since we not kind to the car, which sat in a growing state of disrepair.

It was the Kiernan's son, Sean, who brought the Mustang to auction. He inherited the car in 2014 and began to work with Ford on plans to clean up and show off the model.

Now, the Mustang's time with the Kiernan family has come to an end. The identity of the buyer has not been revealed.

Trending News

 
 

Research and development

Ford names site for battery development facility

Ford's new facility will house battery research and development.

Ford

Ford is in the news again for its electrification efforts, this time with the confirmation of a Michigan location for a new battery research and development facility in Romulus, Michigan. The facility may eventually help Ford in-source much of its EV supply chain, a shift that could prevent or mitigate the challenges presented by parts and technology shortages.

As part of its electrification initiative, the automaker plans to build a new research and development facility, called Ford Ion Park. The facility will house new tech research, pilot programs for new manufacturing techniques, and will help give Ford more control over its supply chain.


Ford Ion Park Once complete, the facility will initially house 200 engineers.Ford


The price tag for the new facility and related efforts lands at $185 million, which sounds like chump change for a global automaker until we consider that Ford has committed $30 billion to electrification by 2025. The automaker says that its new facility renews its dedication to Michigan as its home base for EV development, a promise it originally made back in 2010. The company's new electric F-150 Lightning pickup truck will be built in Dearborn, which will add 500 jobs. An additional 225 jobs will be retained at Ford's Dyke Electric Powertrain Center.

As part of Phase One of the project, Ford plans to hire 200 engineers within 18 months of the 270,000-square-foot facility's opening. Ironically, the site was previously owned by A123 Systems, a battery manufacturer that closed the facility in 2017 due to low demand for batteries.


Ford Ion Park Ford has committed $185 million to the new facility and related efforts.Ford

Trending News

 
 

New sports car

2022 Subaru BRZ pricing announced

The BRZ is all-new for 2022.

Subaru

Earlier this year, Subaru announced the all-new BRZ sports car, which is coming this fall to replace the previous generation of the car that was discontinued in 2020. It, along with its Toyota cousin, the 86, get more power, updated interiors, and better technology than their predecessors.

The BRZ Premium is the base trim of the car. It starts at $28,955 after destination. Adding an automatic transmission drives the price up by $1,600 to $30,555. The BRZ Limited starts at $31,455 after destination, which shifts to $33,255 with an automatic transmission.


2022 Subaru BRZ The BRZ's compact size and manual transmission make it enthusiast friendly.


The 2022 BRZ gets a new 2.4-liter four-cylinder Boxer engine that produces 228 horsepower. Part of the appeal of small, sporty cars like BRZ is that they are infinitely more fun to drive than larger, more computerized vehicles. To that end, the car comes standard with a six-speed close-ratio manual transmission. Buyers can opt to swap in a six-speed automatic transmission, but that almost defeats the point of the car. A Torsen limited-slip differential, vehicle stability control with track mode, and 17-inch wheels round out the car's standard performance features.

Inside, the BRZ comes with an 8-inch touchscreen that runs Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, Bluetooth, SiriusXM radio, and dual-zone automatic climate controls. A new gauge cluster display can show amps, coolant temperatures, or the car's lateral g-forces, and when track mode is engaged, the tachometer shifts from a circular to a color linear graph.


2022 Subaru BRZ An updated interior and tech are highlights of the new BRZ,

Trending News