Off-Roading

Rebelle Rally teams overcome elements, mechanical failures to conquer 1,700-mile course

At the end of the Rebelle Rally, participants drove their vehicles to Broadway Pier in San Diego for a public car show and their awards ceremony.

Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

The recipe for a Rebelle Rally team is straightforward. Take two adventurous women and combine them with analog navigation skills, basic emergency vehicle rescue techniques, and an off-roading-worthy vehicle. Add in a dash of hardiness, good communication skills, and a sense of humor. Marinate for 10 days in California and Nevada's forests, mountains, and deserts. On the last day, bake in the heat of the sun.

The journey itself is anything but simple. Rebelle Rally founder Emily Miller and her team spent months discovering and plotting the course for the navigation challenge, which had its beginning at Lake Tahoe and its end at the Imperial Sand Dunes near the U.S.-Mexico border. Desolate wasteland, tight corners, bulging dunes, craggy trails, and flats were all on the menu. Though the teams likely didn't take the time to stop and enjoy the views, Miller joked during the end-of-event celebration in San Diego on Saturday, the scenery was spectacular.

2019 Rebelle Rally team navigation Rebelle Rally participants were unable to use modern technology to help guide them on the course.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

At the beginning of the journey, temperatures hovered near freezing. By the time the teams reached the dunes, it topped 100 degrees in the abundant sunshine.

The course consisted of a number of check points which garnered the teams points. Green check points, all of which were mandatory, were the easiest and marked by flags. Blue were harder to find with only a few of them marked by flags while the rest were designated by posts. Black check points proved the most difficult with no official markings indicating that the team had arrived at the destination.

2019 Rebelle Rally Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross Team 207 ran a Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross in the event and ended up with second place in the Crossover category.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

How many points the teams earned depended on how close they were to the correct coordinate positioning when they signaled in that they had arrived. They competed in two classes – 4x4 and Crossover. At the end of the race, the team in each category with the most points would leave the desert as the winner.

The 2019 Rebelle Rally ran 1,700 miles and featured 76 women paired up in 38 teams from 67 cities in 20 states/provinces in six countries. The vehicles were as diverse as the drivers themselves, with everything from stock vehicles to specially modified rigs.

None of the going was particularly easy. Team 200, driving a Rolls-Royce Cullinan, suffered during the Johnson Valley stage getting three flat tires. They could only carry two spares, so the teammates had to patch one of the punctures and hope for the best heading to Glamis, California and the final day of the competition. Taking on an extra tire would have resulted in a 50-point penalty and the standings were tight.

2019 Rebelle Rally Land Rover LR4 Team 164 had to be towed back to Base Camp after rolling their Land Rover LR4.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Team 210, driving a 2017 Subaru Crosstrek, lost their clutch during that stage, putting them out of the competition, but the event's mechanics were able to replace the clutch overnight making them able to complete the event though they no longer were eligible for points.

On the last day of competition, Team 164 rolled their 2013 Land Rover LR4 in the Glamis dunes, causing multiple windows to break, the windshield to crack, and airbags to go off. The Rebelle Rally support team was able to rescue the team quickly and towed their Land Rover back to base camp.

Later that evening at dinner, longtime Rebelle Rally competitor and 35-year Army Veteran Rachel Ridenour presented the Land Rover team with a large sticker featuring the image of a rolled over SUV and a phrase favorited by Forrest Gump. In front of the Rebelles, as term Miller uses to refer to the competitors, Ridenour reminded the group of a favorite saying of hers, "There are two types of off-roaders. Those that have rolled and those that haven't rolled yet." The crowd roared with laughter and applause.

2019 Rebelle Rally End Day Stage Glamis Rebelle crossed the finish line at the end of each day not knowing how many points they had earned. They would be told several hours later.Photo by Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

The Rebelle spirit of survival and overcoming obstacles is something that Miller doesn't just promote. She lives it as well. As a respected off-road racer and adventurer in her own right, the competition is just as personal for her as it is for the competitors.

Though Toyotas, Jeeps, and Land Rovers are often thought of as the champions of the off-roading space, the teams piloting them did not come out on top in the Rebelle Rally results.

When all was said and done, Team 190 driving a stock 2019 Lexus GX 460 took top honors in the 4x4 category. The Crossover class was won by Team 200 in their 6,000-pound Sapphire Blue Rolls-Royce Cullinan.

"This Cullinan is a hundred percent more capable than I thought it would be," said Team 200 driver Emme Hall during the awards ceremony Saturday at Broadway Pier in San Diego. "I thought we were going to have to go really slow through a lot of things. I thought we were going to have problems in the dunes. I thought it was going to be too heavy … Every single time, every day, it proved me wrong."

Each year, the Rebelles prove a lot of people wrong, including themselves, by rising to the challenge and pushing themselves and their vehicles to the limits.

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Nuts & Bolts

 
 

The disinfectant is the first of its kind to be mass distributed by an OEM.

Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors

Mitsubishi Motors has announced that its new Diamond Premium Care disinfecting spray has been approved for use by the Environmental Protection Agency, and is effective in killing the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Diamond Premium Care is a non-abrasive, antimicrobial, no-contact disinfecting and deodorizing spray used on vehicle interiors and HVAC systems. Mitsubishi Motors is the first and only OEM deploying this service on a national scale.

"Diamond Premium Care is a rare tool in the fight against COVID-19. It offers peace of mind to the driver of any vehicle, but it's especially valuable to those with added exposure, whether that comes from regularly sharing their vehicle with others or from the direct risk of on-the-job exposure to COVID-19," said MMNA Vice President of Aftersales, Scott Smith. "MMNA and our dealer partners are proud to be able to offer this first-of-its-kind, EPA-approved service to everyone during these challenging times."

Mitsubishi Motors COVID-19 spray The spray can be applied at a local dealership.Photo courtesy of Mitsubishi Motors

Diamond Platinum Care kills 99.99% of viruses and bacteria that inhabit automotive interiors and circulate via the vehicle's HVAC system. It kills SARS-Related Coronavirus 2 on hard, non-porous surfaces. It also eliminates odors at their source without using abrasive chemicals or masking agents.

Here's how it works. The dye-free treatment is applied directly by spray to vehicle surfaces, and for HVAC application, it is applied through the outdoor air intake vent, allowing it to permeate through the HVAC system and cabin interior. For a standard-size vehicle, treatment can be completed in just 10 minutes.

The technology behind Diamond Premium Care™ was developed by Texas-based vehicle disinfecting solutions provider BioPledge.

Diamond Premium Care is currently offered at participating Mitsubishi Motors dealer partners in the U.S. Service must be scheduled in advance with a participating dealer. Pricing may vary. To learn more about this service, and to find a dealership near you, visit mitsubishicars.com/diamond-premium-care-car-disinfectant.

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The 2021 Land Rover Discovery Sport features dynamic all-terrain technology.

Photo courtesy of Land Rover

A new lawsuit by Jaguar and Land Rover's parent company, Jaguar Land Rover Automotive Plc (JLR), filed a lawsuit on Thursday to block the import of new Porsche, Lamborghini, Volkswagen, and Audi vehicles from entering the U.S. The news was reported by Bloomberg.

In its filing with the U.S. International Trade Commission, JLR says that the companies, all under the Volkswagen Group umbrella, are using JLR's patented Terrain Response technology without permission. The technology, which helps vehicles traverse a "broad range of surfaces" is used in a number of vehicles in the JLR lineup including the Jaguar F-Pace and Land Rover Discovery. Those two SUV recently debuted refreshed versions for the 2021 model year.

2021 Jaguar E-Pace Jaguar recently debuted the revised 2021 E-Pace (above) and F-Pace. Photo courtesy of Jaguar

In the filing, JLR specifies that it is looking to block the import of the Porsche Cayenne; Lamborghini Urus; and a host of Audi vehicles including the Q8, Q7, Q5, A6 Allroad, and E-Tron; in addition to the Volkswagen Tiguan. In its complaint, the company says that there are enough vehicles to meet customer demand in the U.S. other than those named in the papers.

In addition to its complaint with the International Trade Commission (ITC), JLR has filed patent lawsuits in Delaware and New Jersey seeking cash compensation for the use of the technology. Traditionally, the ITC works faster than the courts in the investigation of unfair trade practices. ITC cannot award damages, but can block products from entering the U.S. Bloomberg says that ITC investigations are typically completed in 15 to 18 months.

The case is In the Matter of Certain Vehicle Control Systems, 337-3508, U.S. International Trade Commission (Washington). The filing is marked as confidential. JLR is represented in the matter by Latham & Watkins LLP, an International firm that was founded in 1934.

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